Go Back   UG Community @ Ultimate-Guitar.Com > Music > Musician Talk
User Name  
Password
Search:

Reply
Old 10-19-2014, 06:29 PM   #1
Jyuuga
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Soloing in a genre/Creating an original style

I have a question about soloing and/or creating an original style.

Recently I am transcribing and trying to get in my muscle memory so I can play it without thinking, solo's I like from all different kinds of bands. Now I all like all kinds of music but what bothers me is that sometimes when I'm playing at a jamsession, and the feel is for example, reggae or funk, I can't seem to play what really hits the groove.

What I play always sounds like a diverse set of notes and therefore isn't diverse anymore because I play the same way over a different groove. This bothers me because I want to become a guitarist with diverse influences, but also be able to jump to "song/session" mode. Do you have any advice relating to this? Would for instance, it help me to just stick with one style and describe all the melodies from that genre, or can I just keep on transcribing whatever I like? many thanks
Jyuuga is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2014, 02:06 AM   #2
The4thHorsemen
Which way's she spinning?
 
The4thHorsemen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Louisiana
Different styles are kinda like different accents of the same language. It takes some time listening, playing, and getting used to the feel before you can really adopt these new "accents". Just like everything else, the more time you spend with different styles the better you'll get at them.
__________________
The4thHorsemen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2014, 05:30 AM   #3
Sickz
Jazz Musician
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
I would advice keeping a journal for your improv/jam sessions. Let me explain what i mean.

I primarily play jazz and fusion, but i also play a lot of other stuff (blues, funk, reggae etc). When i started out playing all these styles and attending jam sessions, the same thing happened to me. Maybe we were playing over a jazz standard and i had no idea what to play, nothing came to me so i ended up just noodling on chord scales, not having any real vocabulary to use in that situation.

What i did after the sessions was that i would write down the thing that gave me problem, let's say it was that i couldn't come up with anything to play on a minor 2-5-1 progression. Then i would go home, dig through my record collection and find situations where my favorite players were playing over minor 2-5-1s and learn (for example) 10 phrases over the coming weeks, put them through every key, sing them, mentally rehearse them, make them my own etc. So the next time i was faced with a tune with minor 2-5-1s i was ready and had the vocabulary to improvise over it.

Note: With this i don't mean simply "copy pasting" phrases from a recording, atleast not in the long run. You have to take it through the process of "imitate, assimilate and innovate". Imitate it and learn it, assimilate it into your playing so you can use it over time, and then over time innovate with it, make it your own. Just like when you are learning a language you will be very rigid with the language at first, but knowing more vocabulary will make you more flexible.

That's my advice for you. Feel lost on reggae/funk tunes? Find recordings of the reggae/funk tune you were playing (and other tunes with similar progressions) and pick out vocabulary from the soloist that YOU like. Put it through the ringer and play it in as many ways you can, alter it in all ways you can and really absorb it. You don't need to stick with one genre, just find your weak spots and strengthen them.

Best Regards,
Sickz
__________________
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote:
Originally Posted by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."

Last edited by Sickz : 10-20-2014 at 05:37 AM.
Sickz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2014, 05:33 AM   #4
jerrykramskoy
Registered User
 
jerrykramskoy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
There are a lot of cliches that go with genre. There are particular scales, and note omissions, that tend to go with genre. For example, the major scale is not number one choice for death metal. Phrygian doesn't spring to mind to blues. English Folk music doesn't use loads of chromaticism. So, I suggest you choose one or a few genres that you want to play well, and study their vocabulary. Rhythym has a lot to do with genre also.

Great advice from Sickz.

cheers, Jerry

Last edited by jerrykramskoy : 10-20-2014 at 05:34 AM.
jerrykramskoy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2014, 05:36 AM   #5
Jyuuga
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Thanks both!

And especially you Sickz, that's some great advice. I started today with a different practice routine but I think I will adress my weakpoints instead, like you said ! Am really stoked to do start!

and thanks to you too Jerry
Jyuuga is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Yesterday, 07:55 AM   #6
reverb66
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jyuuga
I have a question about soloing and/or creating an original style.

Recently I am transcribing and trying to get in my muscle memory so I can play it without thinking, solo's I like from all different kinds of bands. Now I all like all kinds of music but what bothers me is that sometimes when I'm playing at a jamsession, and the feel is for example, reggae or funk, I can't seem to play what really hits the groove.



There's no way around it - if you want to be proficient in funk or reggae - learn some funk solos and some reggae solos ( and the rhythms!). Dive into some of the great recordings. You can't fake your way through another genre.

I'll give you a secret tip for soloing in funk - learn Sookie Sookie from Grant Green - his solo is a gold mine of funk phrasing - it's almost all minor pentatonic and double stops so it's easy to decipher. Also, learn anything off John Scofield's A Go Go album - another goldmine - however the difficulty level is much higher here.

As for reggae - hit up some Bob Marley and learn a few tunes.
reverb66 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Yesterday, 09:33 AM   #7
Jehannum
Registered Abuser
 
Jehannum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Birmingham, England
There's a possible conflict. The more versatile you get between genres, the less scope there is to get your own sound and style. Balancing the two is the trick.
Jehannum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Yesterday, 10:03 AM   #8
reverb66
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
On the topic of creating your own style, a great tip is to record yourself improvising a lot and then listen to what you've recorded. There are usually a happy accidents or great moments amongst the clutter. Re-learn those musical phrases note for note! practice them and make them a part of your musical vocabulary - these will really help you develop your own style.
reverb66 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:38 AM.

Forum Archives / About / Terms of Use / Advertise / Contact / Ultimate-Guitar.Com © 2014
Powered by: vBulletin Version 3.0.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.