Throw The Boy Down The Well. Part 2

author: Sean0913 date: 03/29/2010 category: for beginners
rating: 9.9 / votes: 9 
This lesson was created by request. In my experience as a musical sojourner, and one who has sought to find knowledge and understand the guitar, I have some to appreciate that the guitar and music have many logical elements, which, when understood, make the learning process so much easier. This is one of the trademark elements of the way I teach guitar using a system I've developed and refined over the years, to this very day. It is in this overall observation concerning music that I always begin my search, when attempting to bring a concept to light. Music is logical, music is largely symmetrical, and therefore the principles are also somewhat predictable...for me. It makes explaining something I have never explained before, easy, because it is a dependable system of assumptions. If you have not reviewed the first lesson in this series, I suggest that you do so, as a context to this lesson. LEDGER LINES To review our basic format, we used FACE to determine our spaces as such:
---------------------------------
                            E
---------------------------------
                         C
---------------------------------
                      A
---------------------------------
                  F
---------------------------------
So let's look at ledger lines BELOW the staff, as they pertain to the use of FACE. Ledger lines are small implied continuations of the normal 5 line musical staff, shown as brief lines in which notes are placed, so as to help us determine pitches higher and lower than the notes which are contained within the parameters of the 5 line staff. These can occur above and below the 5 line staff. We will be using the following diagram format below throughout this lesson. This staff and ledger line idea is shown as follows:
---> Ledger lines
---> Ledger lines
---> Ledger lines
---------------------------------->   Normal music staff lines
---------------------------------->   Normal music staff lines
---------------------------------->   Normal music staff lines
---------------------------------->   Normal music staff lines
---------------------------------->   Normal music staff lines    
--- > Ledger lines
--- > Ledger lines
--- > Ledger lines
LEDGER LINES BELOW THE STAFF: Below the staff, the FACE are located on the LINES now, terminating on E which is the bottom line of the normal musical staff. Look at E is the end of the word E when looking at lines below it:
---> Ledger lines
---> Ledger lines
---> Ledger lines
---------------------------------->    
---------------------------------->    
---------------------------------->    
---------------------------------->    
-E-------------------------------->   Where FACE Terminates    
-C- > Ledger lines
-A- > Ledger lines
-F- > Ledger lines
Notice the word FACE, this time, all LINES below the staff. So let's visually examine how these lay out:
---------------------------------->    
     E
---------------------------------->    
     C
---------------------------------->    
     A
---------------------------------->     
     F                                FACE starts here on the spaces
-E-------------------------------->       
-C- > Ledger lines
-A- > Ledger lines
-F- > Ledger lines
LEDGER LINES ABOVE THE STAFF: To determine the notes on Ledger lines ABOVE the staff, we first must fine where F is. Its at the top line, of the staff and then the word FACE is continued in the upper ledger lines as follows:
-E-> Ledger lines
-C-> Ledger lines
-A-> Ledger lines
-F-------------------------------->   F on the top line of the staff
---------------------------------->    
---------------------------------->    
---------------------------------->    
---------------------------------->       
--- > Ledger lines
--- > Ledger lines
--- > Ledger lines
So, breaking it down on how the ledger lines work, both upper and lower ones we find that the TOP Line is F, and BEGINS our word FACE. The BOTTOM line is E, and ENDS our word FACE, as shown below:
-E-> Ledger lines
-C-> Ledger lines
-A-> Ledger lines
-F-------------------------------->   F BEGINS the word FACE here
---------------------------------->    
---------------------------------->    
---------------------------------->    
-E-------------------------------->   E ENDS the word FACE here  
-C- > Ledger lines
-A- > Ledger lines
-F- > Ledger lines
So putting the FACES together on our staff, we arrive at the following system:
-E->  
-C->  
-A->  
-F-------------------------------->   Normal music staff lines
                E                       Space
---------------------------------->   Normal music staff lines
             C                          Space
---------------------------------->   Normal music staff lines
          A                             Space
---------------------------------->   Normal music staff lines
       F                                Space
-E-------------------------------->   Normal music staff lines    
-C- >  
-A- >  
-F- > 
TRIADS: Most Triads are easily identified, as far as the Letter name that triad has in sheet music. They are usually all lines or all spaces. The determination of quality (major minor, augmented, diminished) is beyond the scope of this lesson. For that you'd simply want to learn a system of quickly identifying the types of triads there are, whether it be my system, or one found elsewhere, the results would be, that you'd be able to identify the quality of triads as they lie on the musical staff. Triads can be seen as your beginning chords, made up of three notes. There are 4 types, but usually we see only 2 - Major or Minor (the other two are Augmented and Diminished, but we don't run across them very much). For now I'm simply going to get you started by supplying the alphabetical letter of the triad. i.e. Some kind of F triad, Some kind of G triad, etc. As I said, generally first position triads (beginner) are either on all lines or all spaces, one right after the other, and are found in threes. And, using FACE, as we have studied it to identify the notes on the staff, we can determine these quickly: ALL SPACE EXAMPLE
---------------------------------->    
                                        Space
---------------------------------->    
       C                                ending note of the triad
---------------------------------->    
       A                                middle voice of the F triad
---------------------------------->    
       F                                Some kind of F triad, beginning note
---------------------------------->    
HERE IS AN ALL LINE EXAMPLE. It is assumed that by this point you learned how to use FACE to determine the starting line is a G. If not, study the first lesson in this series: ALL LINE EXAMPLE
---------------------------------->    
                                      
-------D-------------------------->   Ending note of the G triad
                                        
-------B-------------------------->   Middle note of the G triad
                                       
-------G-------------------------->   Some kind of G triad, Root note
                                        
---------------------------------->
The ideas can extend into the ledger lines as well. Heres an example of a C triad in the lower ledger lines:
---------------------------------->   
                                        
---------------------------------->   
                                       
---------------------------------->   
                                      
-G-------------------------------->   
                                        
-E-------------------------------->   
    
-C- > Ledger lines
With these examples, you should have a better handle on how our understanding of FACE, in the musical staff helps us even with Ledger lines, and determining simple triads (chords) Good luck in your musical pursuits! Drop me a line if I can be of any help. Best, Sean
More Sean0913 lessons:
+ Tap Dancing With Triads Guitar Techniques 03/23/2010
+ Throw The Boy Down The Well For Beginners 03/22/2010
+ Speed Kills For Beginners 03/18/2010
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