Brian Aubert Of Silversun Pickups

author: Weeping_Demon7 date: 06/29/2010 category: guitar gurus
rating: 9.8 / votes: 9 
Brian Aubert of the L.A. based indie-rock band, Silversun Pickups while relatively unknown, is a skilled guitarist incorporating influences from My Bloodie Valentine to the Smashing Pumpkins to blues. His guitar skills are a mix of layered fuzz-tracks and clean chords that come together to create a band rich in sound. His style can be broken down into five components: chords, riffs, solos, technique and layering. I'll cover all five of these in this tutorial. I also touch base on his set up, or a general tone that he achieves for each song that I'll cover including effects, guitars, and overdrive/distortion/fuzz. CHORDS ------ Firstly, Aubert rarely uses what most guitarists know as the "basic chords". Rather, he likes to incorporate larger octave ranges with fewer notes, whilst layering them together to create a more complex sound. He also likes to use these harmonies as riffs, so the line between riffs and chords are often blurred, but I'll do my best to differentiate between them. So, for the first example we're going to look at 2 parts of a song off of their newest album, Swoon titled "Substitution". The first part is the main theme for the intro and verse. But the first thing we should notice is this repeated "2 to 4" effect Aubert uses on the G-string whilst droning the G-note. The effect is this constant resolution from the sus2 of G major to the full chord.
-------------------------------||---------------------------|
-------------------------------||---------------------------|
--2--4-----4br----2-----2------||--2--4-----6br----4--2--0--|
--0--0-----0------0-----0--[x3]||--0--0-----0------0--0--0--|
--------x------------x---------||--------x------------------|
--3--3--x--3------3--x--3------||--3--3--x--5------5--3--3--|
To play this, you're going to need to fret the 3rd fret of the 6th string with your middle finger whilst slightly pressing up against the 5th string with the same finger to mute it. Keep the D string open, whilst playing the 2nd fret, G string with your index finger and then playing the 4th fret with your pinky BUT still keep your index finger behind it. When you go to do that slight bend, your going to want to naturally bend all the notes, which is fine because that's how Aubert does it. It's that slight dissonance that gives the intro that neat feel. Honestly though, it's a lot easier to feel the song from listening to it then to try and get the feel from the tab, so have a listen. When you make the move to the sixth fret bend, just slide your entire hand up to that position and it makes for an easier transition.
--------------------------|---------------------------|
--3--3-----7--7--7--------|---------------------------|
--4--4-----7--7--7-----2--|--2--4-----4br----2-----2--|
--4--4-----7--7--7-----0--|--0--0-----0------0-----0--|
--2--2-----5--5--5--------|--------x------------x-----|
-----------------------3--|--3--3--x--3------3--x--3--|
When going to the verse part ("There's a vulture perching right of screen..." hit the chords right as the Aubert is singing. You really wanna make sure you nail the B minor because that full chord is important. But that's pretty much it for that part of the song. The chorus part keeps that same feel, but just moves up the "2 to 4" feel to the D string and it gives it a bit more of a bluesy feel. I have the bass notes in parentheses mainly because what you're going to be accenting are the changing notes, not the pedal tones. One more thing, Aubert's rhythms aren't concrete. A lot of it is feel, not just what's written. What I have written is just an outline. Keep that in mind.
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--------------------------------------|
--------------------------------------|
---2----4-------4br---4----2----0-----|
-------------------------------(0)----|
--(3)--(3)-----(3)---(3)--(3)---------|
So what we're first presented is this same idea of a G chord with "substituted" (get it?) E and F#, similar to the verse idea. It's actually a really cool effect that changes the tonality of the song, makes it more mellow and a little bit more bluesy in my opinion. To play this, make sure you're not letting the A string ring. Finger the sixth string with your middle finger, and the E-note with your index. I like to finger the F# with my pinky, but that's me; it makes the bending part easier.
-----------------------------------------|
-----------------------------------------|
-----------------------------------------|
---2----4-------4br---4----2----0----2---|
--(2)--(2)-----(2)---(2)--(2)--(0)--(2)--|
-----------------------------------------|
 
Same principle here. Except I barre the second fret notes. 
 
--------------------------------------|
--------------------------------------|
--------------------------------------|
---2----4-------4br---4----2----0-----|
--(2)--(2)-----(2)---(2)--(2)--(0)----|
--------------------------------------|
 
-----------------------------------------|
-----------------------------------------|
-----------------------------------------|
---4----7-------7br---7----4----0----4---|
--(5)--(5)-----(5)---(5)--(5)--(0)--(5)--|
-----------------------------------------|
I finger this (6th string to 1st string) middle, index, pinky. 
 
--------------------------------------|
--------------------------------------|
--------------------------------------|
---4----7-------7br---7----4----0-----|
--(5)--(5)-----(5)---(5)--(5)--(0)----|
--------------------------------------|
 
-----------------------------------------|
-----------------------------------------|
-----------------------------------------|
---2----4-------4br---4----2----0----2---|
--(0)--(0)-----(0)---(0)--(0)--(0)--(0)--|
-----------------------------------------|
Then just index and pinky. 
 
--------------------------------------|
--------------------------------------|
--------------------------------------|
---2----4-------4br---4----2----0-----|
--(0)--(0)-----(0)---(0)--(0)--(0)----|
--------------------------------------|
I really like this progression a lot. This entire song is pretty cool, and I think it's a great example of Aubert's methods. Guitar tone wise, I'm pretty sure that he uses his Epiphone Shereton. His tone for this is more or less an amp overdrive, which then switches to fuzz for the chorus and bridge and his solo diddy. Live he favors Hiawatt, but he'll also use JCM-2000 DSLs and Fender Hot Rods, so I'm not sure what the amp he used to record this song is. Personally, I run my Marshall 800 on a clean channel with my Tube King going, low volume pots, and then switch it off for the chorus and turn on my Fuzz Factory on a more milder setting for the chorus and bridge and solo. Sometimes I'll just use the amps OD channel and turn the volume pots down. This next example is from the intro of the first track off of their first full-length debut album, Carnavas, and is called Melatonin. This features steady sixteenth notes in a relatively slow piece of music. The effect is a chugging effect on the guitar that is only being played in the intros and choruses, and also used in the interlude. Use alternate strumming, though it's hardly a fast piece.
     G                                
  
E||--3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-|
B||--3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-|
G||--0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-|
D||--0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-|
A||--2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-|
E||--3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-|
Basic G with a D on the B string. This makes the transition to the Dsus4add9 easier. Finger at as (low to high) middle, index, ring, pinky.
  Dsus4add9                                
 
--3---------3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-|
--3---------3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-|
--2---------2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-|
--2---------2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-|
--0---------0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-|
------------------------------------------|
Just switch your middle and index fingers from the 3rd and 2nd frets repectivally to the second frets.
  Cadd9                                  Dsus4               D                
--3-----3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-|--3-----3-3-3-3-3-3-3-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-
--3-----3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-|--3-----3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-
--0-----0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-|--2-----2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-
--2-----2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-|--0-----0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-
--3-----3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-|--------------------------------------
--------------------------------------|--------------------------------------
Now just finger this Cadd9 like a G, but moved up a string. Hit the Ds like the normal chords they are.
  Dsus4add9                                

--3---------3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-|
--3---------3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-|
--2---------2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-|
--2---------2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-|
--0---------0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-|
------------------------------------------|
And use the same position here like you did for the other Dsus4add9. AFTER THAT GO TO BACK TO THE DSUS4/D MEASURE The progression is a I-to an implied V (though the effect is a suspension)-to a IV with a D in the chord, back to a Vsus4 to V. I like that progression because it "kinda" resolves, but then just goes right back to the IV then resolves after a Vsus4. Tone wise, this songs features lots of fuzz guitars layered with some distortion guitars and probably some reverb. My advice is to go for a thick fuzz tone (Fuzz Face or Fuzz Factory) and some adequate reverb and a very slight delay. The final chord example we are going to look at is the chorus to Panic Switch, which is off Swoon. I'll show you how to play it then give an theoretical reason as to what is going on musically.
   Db                                                  
 
--------------------------|--------------------------|
--6--6--6--6--6--6--6--6--|--6--6--6--6--6--6--6--6--|
--------------------------|--------------------------|
--6--6--6--6--6--6--6--6--|--6--6--6--6--6--6--6--6--|
--4--4--4--4--4--4--4--4--|--4--4--4--4--4--4--4--4--|
--------------------------|--------------------------|
What we're first looking at is a simple Db triad, but how you might see it played on the piano. The open voicings give it a clearer tone which sounds better at higher distortion levels. Finger it (low string to high, 6 to 1) index, ring, pinky and use steady alternate strumming.
   Fm                                                                 
  
----------------------------------|----------------------------------|
---9---9---9---9---9---9---9---9--|---9---9---9---9---9---9---9---9--|
----------------------------------|----------------------------------|
--10--10--10--10--10--10--10--10--|--10--10--10--10--10--10--10--10--|
---8---8---8---8---8---8---8---8--|---8---8---8---8---8---8---8---8--|
----------------------------------|----------------------------------|
Finger it as index, ring, middle 
 
  Eb                                                  
  
--------------------------|--------------------------|
--8--8--8--8--8--8--8--8--|--8--8--8--8--8--8--8--8--|
--------------------------|--------------------------|
--8--8--8--8--8--8--8--8--|--8--8--8--8--8--8--8--8--|
--6--6--6--6--6--6--6--6--|--6--6--6--6--6--6--6--6--|
--------------------------|--------------------------|
...index, ring, pinky....
 
  Cm                                                  
    
--------------------------|--------------------------|
--4--4--4--4--4--4--4--4--|--4--4--4--4--4--4--4--4--|
--------------------------|--------------------------|
--5--5--5--5--5--5--5--5--|--5--5--5--5--5--5--5--5--|
--3--3--3--3--3--3--3--3--|--3--3--3--3--3--3--3--3--|
--------------------------|--------------------------|
...and finally index, ring, middle
So firstly, this song is in F minor. The chorus, however, does not start on the tonic chord and instead starts on the sub-mediant, that being the major sixth chord. The progression is VI to i to VII the V. Neat! It's a really cool thing though that he does with the voicings of the cord. It's a lot more open which sounds better, in my opinion then a regular triad. Aubert does this as well on songs like the "Royal We" as well. You're looking at a guitar tone that's very similar to the Melatonin tone but with a bit more of a "wetter" fuzz sound. For instance, add a little bit of stability on the Fuzz Factory if you have one. ------------- Riffs Aubert's riffs are pretty diverse sounding, but generally he likes to incorporate double stops and intervals to give the song a bigger sound. The first riff that we'll look at is the intro theme from Lazy Eye. I've just taken some excerpts from the song, but these parts of the riff aren't the continuous part of the song.
----------------------------------|----------------------------------|
----------------------------------|----------------------------------|
----------------------------------|----------------------------------|
----------------------------------|----------------------------------|
--11--11--11--11--11--11--11--11--|--9--9--9--9g11----11--11br--9-11-|
---0---0---0---0---0---0---0---0--|--0--0--0-----0-----0---0----0--0-|
I'd finger this with your third finger on the 11th fret and then just your index on the 9th fret. That way when you do the little bend, you'll have more finger-power to do it with.
----------------------------------|------------------------------------|
----------------------------------|------------------------------------|
----------------------------------|------------------------------------|
----------------------------------|------------------------------------|
--11--11--11--11--11--11--11--11--|--9s--7s--9--9g11----11--11br--9-11-|
---0---0---0---0---0---0---0---0--|--0---L---L-----0-----0---0----0--0-|
Same principle here, but when you slide down to the 7th fret, do so with your first finger, then use your ring finger on the 9th fret and reset your position on the 11th fret when you do the final slide. What we're looking at here is this root/third principle that's exemplifies Aubert's usage of spacious chordal voicings. The fact that the chords are spaced over an octave apart gives this interesting spacial vacancy effect. This is intensified when the major third interval of the tonic chord is moved down to the second interval which gives it a very pleasant and open sound that wants to resolve back to the major third. The guitar tone on this track is a pretty flat sounding clean with the slightest hint of break up. I would do this live by just turning down the volume pots on an od channel (or if you have a responsive od pedal like a Tube King) and then turning up for the power chord part of the song, which isn't shown here. The next excerpt we'll look at is the intro riff to Panic Switch off Swoon.
E||-------------------------|------------------------|-----------------------
B||-------------------------|------------------------|-----------------------
G||-------------------------|------------------------|-----------------------
D||--3-------------------1--|--3------------------1--|--3------------------1-
A||-----------1-------4-----|----------1-------4-----|----------1-------4----
E||-------1-------4---------|------1-------4---------|------1-------4--------
This is a neat little riff because it starts with this cool octave, then outlines some notes that don't fit into an F minor such as the fourth and sixth of the chord. It's a pretty simple riff but requires a fair bit of hand movement. Furthermore, certain parts of the riff need to ring out together, such as the fourth-fret roll; it should be rung out. Your hand therefore needs to be lifted and not muting any strings. Tone is a pretty wet fuzz. The final riff of SSPU that we'll be looking at is the riff from Kissing Families off their Pikul EP.
----------------------------|----------------------------|
--5s--5--5--5--5--5--5--5-5-|--5s--7--7--7--7--7--7--7-7-|
--6s--6--6--6--6--6--6--6-6-|--6s--8--8--8--8--8--8--8-8-|
----------------------------|----------------------------|
----------------------------|----------------------------|
----------------------------|----------------------------|
   
----------L------------------------|---------------|
--7--7br--L--7-7-12-12-12--12---12-|--10--10--5----|
--8--8br--L--8-8--9--9--9---9----9-|---9---9--6----|
-----------------11-11-11--11---11-|--11--11-------|
-----------------------------------|---------------|
-----------------------------------|---------------|
For analytical purposes, you're looking in the first measure of an implied A major to B major that resolves to the E major (which is then complimented with the A-note that is added) For the first bit, you need to slide into the A and play using down strokes except for the 16th note rhythm then do the same type of slide into the B. Right before you go to the E, play the B and G open strings for an eigth beat then hit the E section. I really like this riff. The voicings are really cool and if you play it with the same amount of technique and emotion as how it sounds on the album I think it's quite beautiful. The tone on this riff seems to be an acoustic guitar because it has that percussive sound, but it also has a warm almost overdrive like quality. I'm assuming it's Aubert's Shereton run through a Fender DeVille or something of that nature. -------------- Solos Aubert's solos alternate pentatonics, minor and major, major scales, arepeggios, and passing tones. Which, when taken out of context doesn't really seem that unique, but actually, with some added help with his tone layering, his solos manage to sound very original and unique. When playing a solo, and that's any solo in general, I would never hope for someone to play a solo note-for-note in a live setting or recording session. I believe a solo to be the emotional height of a song, and therefore mimicking someone elses emotion is not emotional at all. That's why playing someone elses solo can never sound better then the solo itself. For those reasons, look at this as a guide to improving your own solos, not as something to rely upon if you're covering a song. But the first solo, or actually set of solos, (is that Soli?) is from Lazy Eye. It has 3 parts that I consider to be solos. This is the "First Solo"
|--------------------------|
|--------------------------|
|--------------------------|
|--------------------14-14-|
|--------------------------|
|--------------------------|
Kicks off with pickup notes in the E-Minor pentatonic which brings a temporary blues tone to the song...
-----------------------------------|-------------------------------------|
-----------------------------------|-------------------------------------|
-----------------------------------|-------------------------------------|
--14--14--12-----------------------|--------------9------------9---------|
--------------14----12h-14-12--11--|--9h-11-9h-11----11--9h-11----11--9--|
-----------------------------------|-------------------------------------|
Which continutes through the first full measure until it resolves on that last note played in the first measure, the G#. Aubert then builds on the main riff showcased earlier in this tutorial with the set of hammerons etc.
-------------------------|--------------------------|
-------------------------|--------------------------|
-------------------------|-----9--9--9--9--9--9--9--|
-------------------------|-----x--x--x--x--x--x--x--|
--7--6--4--4g2----2------|-----7--7--7--7--7--7--7--|
-------------------------|--------------------------|
He then descends into this delay induced effect. The next part is this octave riff that takes the main motif and expands on it.
-----------------------------------|-----------------------------|
-----------------------------------|-----------------------------|
--11---x--x-11--13----13--13-----x-|--L---9--9--9-9-9--9--x--11--|
---x---x--x--x---x-----x---x-----x-|--L---x--x--x-x-x--x--x---x--|
---9---x--x--9--11----11--11br---x-|--L---7--7--7-7-7--7--x---9--|
---------------------------------0-|--L--------------------------|
This continues. Make sure to do that slight bend at the G# where indicated then mute it and hit that low E to give it that kind of "screw-up" effect.
                    TP                                              
   E  E   E   Q     Q.        W                   W                 
---------------------------|-------------------|-------------------|
---------------------------|-------------------|-------------------|
---x--9---x--13----13------|-------------------|-------------------|
---x--x---x---x-----x------|-------------------|-------------------|
---x--7---x--11----11------|-------------------|-------------------|
---------------------------|-------------------|-------------------|
The solo then resolves. Things to look at in this first part is the repeated "main riff" motif. This will be evident in the other two solos, but this is good because as a listener, you relate better to something that you're familiar riff. See how Aubert uses this basic riff as an expansion for several tasteful solos? The next solo is this octave run that is a complete take off of the main motif and is therefore very simple to learn.
-------------------|----------------------------------------|
-------------------|----------------------------------------|
-------------------|--13-13-13--13--13-13-13--13--13--13-13-|
-------------------|---x--x--x---x---x--x--x---x---x---x--x-|
-------------------|--11-11-11--11--11-11-11--11--11--11-11-|
-------------------|----------------------------------------|
 
-----------------------------------|----------------------------------------|
-----------------------------------|----------------------------------------|
--11--x-11--x-11-13----13--13------|---x-13-13--13--13-13-13--13--13--13--x-|
---x--x--x--x--x--x-----x---x------|---x--x--x---x---x--x--x---x---x---x--x-|
---9--x--9--x--9-11----11--11br----|---x-11-11--11--11-11-11--11--11--11--x-|
-----------------------------------|----------------------------------------|
 
---------------------------------|----------------------------------------|
---------------------------------|----------------------------------------|
--11--x-11--x-11-13----9--9--9-9-|--13-13-13--13--13-13-13--13--13--13-13-|
---x--x--x--x--x--x----x--x--x-x-|---x--x--x---x---x--x--x---x---x---x--x-|
---9--x--9--x--9-11----7--7--7-7-|--11-11-11--11--11-11-11--11--11--11-11-|
---------------------------------|----------------------------------------|
 
-----------------------------------|-------------------------------------|
-----------------------------------|-------------------------------------|
--11--x-11-11-11-13----13--13------|---x-13-13--13--13-13-13--13--x--11--|
---x--x--x--x--x--x-----x---x------|---x--x--x---x---x--x--x---x--x---x--|
---9--x--9--9--9-11----11--11br----|---x-11-11--11--11-11-11--11--x---9--|
-----------------------------------|-------------------------------------|
 
-------------------------|-------------------|-------------------|
-------------------------|-------------------|-------------------|
--x--9--x--13----13------|-------------------|-------------------|
--x--x--x---x-----x------|-------------------|-------------------|
--x--7--x--11----11------|-------------------|-------------------|
-------------------------|-------------------|-------------------|
Finally, the last solo, or the fuzz induced one that showcases Aubert's tone-lapping:
----------------------|-------------------------------|
----------------------|-------------------------------|
----------------------|-------------------------------|
------9---------------|--9----------------------------|
--11------------------|-----12----11----11h-12-11--9--|
----------------------|-------------------------------|
 
----------------------------------|-----------------------|
----------------------------------|-----------------------|
----------------------------------|-----------------------|
--------9------------9------------|-----------------------|
--9h-11----11--9h-11----11--9--7--|--6--7--4--2----2------|
----------------------------------|-----------------------|
 
---------------------------------|-----------------------------|
---------------------------------|-----------------------------|
---------------------------------|-----------------------------|
---------------------------------|-----------------------------|
-----11--11--11--11--11--11--11--|--9--9--9--11----11--11br----|
---------------------------------|-----------------------------|
 
----------------------------------|---------------------------|
----------------------------------|---------------------------|
----------------------------------|---------------------------|
----------------------------------|---------------------------|
--11--11--11--11--11--11--11--11--|--9s--7s--9--11----11------|
----------------------------------|---------------------------|
Aubert manages to make a few notes sound a lot bigger and more important with his use of fuzz. Playing this on an acoustic guitar doesn't have the same effect. Try and get a really thick and creamy fuzz. Not neccessarly wet, but with lots of depth. Take off some of the bite that comes with something like a Fuzz Factory. The next solo we'll look at is the one from Substitution. It's a neat solo for a couple of reasons: firstly, it's arppeggios are nice and thick with a sweet sounding fuzz. Secondly, the chord progression it's played around is in itself interesting, but the way that the solo comes in right after this heavy and doomy sounding bridge makes the solo seem like you've just cleared the clouds kind of. Really neat effect. So in order to appriciate the effect of this solo, we'll look at the chords preceeding the actual solo and the chord progression of the solo itself. The preceeding chords are power chords that go G5>E5>A5>F#5. It sounds kinda doomy and sludgy which accents the solo's chords.
Bm                                                  
 
--------------------------|--------------------------|
-----7--------7--------7--|--------7--------7--------|
--7--------7--------7-----|-----7--------7-----------|
--------9--------9--------|--9--------9--------9-----|
--------------------------|--------------------------|
--------------------------|--------------------------|
 
 
Bsus4                                            
   
-----------------------------|--------------------------|
-----7-----------7--------7--|--------7--------7--------|
--9-----------9--------9-----|-----9--------9-----------|
--------9-----------9--------|--9--------9--------9-----|
-----------------------------|--------------------------|
-----------------------------|--------------------------|
 
Am                                            
  
--------------------------|--------------------------|
-----5--------5--------5--|--------5--------5--------|
--7--------7--------7-----|-----7--------7-----------|
--------7--------7--------|--7--------7--------7-----|
--------------------------|--------------------------|
--------------------------|--------------------------|
 
F#7                                                  
  
---------------------------|--------------------------|
--5---7-----5--7-----5--7--|-----5--7-----5--7--------|
---------6--------6--------|--6--------6--------6-----|
---------------------------|--------------------------|
---------------------------|--------------------------|
---------------------------|--------------------------|
As you can see, the chords are Bm>Bsus4>Am>F#7 That's not a standard progression that we see (it's the iii>ii>VII7) which is very unique. To play this, let the notes ring out but pick them clearly. With the fuzz on you'll very soon get a wall of noise effect assuming you have the proper settings which fills the air up very quickly. The only challenging part is getting fluid shifts. The best way to finger the first chord is (from low E to high e) ring finger, then index barring the 7th fret. The next chord put your pinky in place of the G string 7th fret barre to the 9th fret. Slide this shape down a whole step. Use your index, ring, then middle finger for the F# part. This song is technically in lydian mode of G because of the sharp C. So that means that the F# chord isn't diminished, but minor and that the A chord is major. ---------------- Technique Technique is how someone plays the way they do. Everyone has a different technique from how they hold their pick to how they hammer on and pull off. Brian has fairly aggressive pick attacks and angles his pick at a slight angle to give his notes a slightly airy sound to them. He also likes to use micro bends in a lot of places. Listen for them. They're often subtle and could be classified as vibrato. On a whole, you'll notice sparse chord spacing. The more octaves he has between two notes, the better. You'll also notice an affinity for open strings in his riffs. He also likes to expand on a motif through out the entire song. Look for patterns in songs. ---------------- Layering The biggest aspect of Silversun Pickups sound is the use of heavily layered guitars, typically each with fuzz. The studio result is this wall of noise effect that also incurrs some slight delay. To acheive this live, you're going to need reverb, 2 delay pedals (one set for the normal riffs with maybe a few milliseconds of delay and another set for solo delay if you like it like that) and a decent fuzz pedal. The Russian Big Muff works wonders, but a Fuzz Factory would suffice as would several other fuzzes. The hollowbody guitar he also uses as an asset to his sound to incorperate feed back. I have an Ibanez Artcore AG-75, and if there's a remote amount of gain on the amp your playing, you'll get a wall of feed back quite quickly. When you know how to use it, it allows for you to make your band seem bigger then what it is which is a usefull trick that SSPU employs live. All in all, we've covered the 5 most important aspects of Brian Aubert. I hope that as a player you'll take from this not just his riffs and solos but a new measure of thinking. Thanks.
More Weeping_Demon7 lessons:
+ Matt Bellamy Of Muse Guitar Gurus 02/22/2010
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