Matt Bellamy Of Muse

author: Weeping_Demon7 date: 02/22/2010 category: guitar gurus
rating: 9.8 / votes: 18 
While some guitarists can be narrowed down into one category of playing such as blues, metal, or shred, to name a few, Bellamy has a blend of several styles. In this guide, I'll attempt to outline the playing principles that Bellamy uses to create the guitar lines that are Muse. On top of that, I'll also explore his extensive use of effects and gear that makes Muse so progressive.

Playing Style

-------------- Firstly, it can be noted that Muse's style has changed over the course of it's 5 albums, Showbiz to Resistance. But Bellamy's core style has remained the same. It's been noted in many interviews that Bellamy composes his music on piano, and transfers it to guitar. But what we can see from this is that the part played on guitar is only just half of the songs. Which leads us to one of the ego problems that rock guitarists face. We think of our selves as the leading instrument in the band. However, in Muse, the bass, which is also arranged on the piano, is probably more important. So learning the guitar part is actually only half of the song being played. Bellamy is a classically trained musician, at least playing wise. His songs almost always extend beyond the range of simple power chords and root bass notes. So, what I'm going to do is break down Bellamy's style into 3 components, his rhythm guitar chords, his arpeggios, and his riffs. But before I explore some specific examples of his style, it should be noticed that almost all of his songs exhibit fairly liberal use of chromatic passing tones. Even on songs that aren't meant to sound "mysterious". This can be attributed to his piano influence and composition. So you'll notice lots of out-of-key notes in every thing between his chords to his arpeggios to his riffs.

Chords

------ Bellamy uses power chords sparsely, and prefers to keep larger harmonies in his chordal arrangement. Typically, he uses power chords to emphasize heavier-sounding parts. To accent this, I'll show you some examples of his work. In "Map of the Problematique" from the Black Holes and Revelations album, Bellamy embellishes heavily in fully voiced chords.
     Cm                                 
E|||-----------------------------------|
B|||--4--------4---4-------4-------4---|
G|||--5--------5---5-------5-------5---|
D|||--5--------5---5-------5-------5---|
A|||--3--3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-|
E|||-----------------------------------|
 
  Eb                                  Ab                                
--6----6-------6-------6-------6---|-------4---4-------4---4-------4---|
--8----8-------8-------8-------8---|-------4---4-------4---4-------4---|
--8----8-------8-------8-------8---|--5----5---5-------5---5-------5---|
--8----8-------8-------8-------8---|--6--6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-|
--6--6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-|--6----6---6-------6---6-------6---|
-----------------------------------|-----------------------------------|
 
  Fm                                  Cm                                
--4------------4---------------4---|-----------------------------------|
--6--------6---6-------6-------6---|--4--------4---4-------4-------4---|
--5--------5---5-------5-------5---|--5--------5---5-------5-------5---|
--3--3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-|--5--------5---5-------5-------5---|
--3--------3---3-------3-------3---|--3--3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-|
-----------------------------------|-----------------------------------|
Aside from the his weird octave generator effect (more on that later), it's a pretty basic chord progression, aside from never resolving to the dominate chord in the progression. But, what makes it interesting is that, while the Cm and Eb chords are more or less standard barre chords, the Ab and Fm both have the fifth in bass, and omit the lowest possible chord tone. If you look at the grand instrumentation however, you'll see that the bass is accenting the bass notes, which Bellamy further accents by adding the "chink chink" effect that is when he actually plays the entire chord, instead of doing the pedal tone bass note that is normally being played. The over all effect is a very harmonic sound that adds a lot more flavor to the song. As for actually playing the progression, you'll want to do the Cm and Eb like you would any other normal barre chord. You're going to need to make a position change between the Eb and Ab. Slide down towards the nut and and finger the chord as follows: (from lowest string to highest E string) ring, pinky, middle, index. And then just shift down to the F minor by dropping the middle finger and barring the first fret from the third string down. This next example deals with the verse riff from STOCKHOLM SYNDROME.
||-----------------------------------|
||-----------------------------------|
||*--7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-|
||*----------------------------------|
||---5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-|
||-----------------------------------|
   
----------------------------------|----------------------------------|
----------------------------------|----------------------------------|
--5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-|--4-4-4-4-4-4-4-4-4-4-4-4-4-4-4-4-|
----------------------------------|----------------------------------|
--5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-|--5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-|
----------------------------------|----------------------------------|
  
----------------------------------|----------------------------------|
----------------------------------|----------------------------------|
--3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-3-|--7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-|
----------------------------------|----------------------------------|
--5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-|--5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-|
----------------------------------|----------------------------------|
   
----------------------------------|----------------------------------|
----------------------------------|----------------------------------|
--6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-|--5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-|
----------------------------------|----------------------------------|
--7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-|--8-8-8-8-8-8-8-8-8-8-8-8-8-8-8-8-|
----------------------------------|----------------------------------|
  
----------------------------------|
----------------------------------|
--7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-|
--------------------0-0-0-0-0-0-0-|
--9-9-9-9-9-9-9-9-9-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-|
----------------------------------|
 
--------------------------------------------------|
--------------------------------------------------|
---7--7--7--7--7--7--7--7--7--7--7--7--7--7--7--7-|
---8--8--8--8--8--8--8--8--8--8--8--8--8--8--8--8-|
--10-10-10-10-10-10-10-10-10-10-10-10-10-10-10-10-|
--------------------------------------------------|
  
----------------------------------|----------------------------------|
----------------------------------|----------------------------------|
--7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-|--7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-|
--7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-|--5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-|
--8-8-8-8-8-8-8-8-8-8-8-8-8-8-8-8-|--7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-|
----------------------------------|----------------------------------|
 
----------------------------------|----------------------------------|
----------------------------------|----------------------------------|
--7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-|--7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-|
--5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-|--5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-|
--6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-|--0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-|
----------------------------------|----------------------------------|
  
----------------------------------|----------------------------------|
----------------------------------|----------------------------------|
--6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-|--6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-|
--5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-|--7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-|
--0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-|--0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-|
----------------------------------|----------------------------------|
 
----------------------------------||
----------------------------------||
--6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-||
--7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-||
--0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-||
----------------------------------||
So, the first thing we're looking at is a pretty generic octave chug. The higher octave goes to the minor seventh, which then does a passing chromatic run to the major sixth, which then resolves to the minor sixth. The progression goes back to the octave, where it then does a cool thing where the two tones move in contrary motion towards each other, the first time it goes to a out-of-key harmony, then to an F5, then to another out-of-key harmony. The effect of the last part of that run is a slowly closing in chordal tone that builds up into a second part consisting of various triads. The next section's first chord is a pure G minor triad. Evidence of a high amount of piano composition. It then progresses to a D minor in first inversion. The next chord isn't one of any musical importance in terms of analyzing, but that chord shape is one that Bellamy likes to use quite a lot. The next chord is one that is could be a G minor 7 with out a fifth which wants to resolve to the tonic, but Bellamy instead drones an A in the next chord which just heightens the tension. The next chords features a tritone, which has some of the highest dissonance in western-music which then goes to an equally dissonant A major which is out of key. Another song that shows really good examples of fully voiced chords is in the song "Thoughts of a Dying Atheist". Bellamy starts the songs off with a series of progressive arpeggios (which I'll also touch on the arpeggio example) but for the chorus, he goes to a chord progression that almost changes the key because it centres around the iv chord which can actually change the tonic resolution of a song.
   Cm                     Eb                  F                                
-------------------------------------------|----------------------------------|
---8--8--8--8--8--8--8--8-8--8-8-8-8-8-8-8-|--6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6-|
---8--8--8--8--8--8--8--8-8--8-8-8-8-8-8-8-|--5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-|
--10-10-10-10-10-10-10-10-8--8-8-8-8-8-8-8-|--7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-|
-------------------------------------------|----------------------------------|
-------------------------------------------|----------------------------------|
 
  Bb               Dm                  Gm               Bdim                
------------------------------------|--6--6-6-6-6-6-6-6-7----7-7-7-7-7-7-7-|
--6--6-6-6-6-6-6-6-6--6-6-6-6-6-6-6-|--8--8-8-8-8-8-8-8-6----6-6-6-6-6-6-6-|
--7--7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7--7-7-7-7-7-7-7-|--7--7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7----7-7-7-7-7-7-7-|
--8--8-8-8-8-8-8-8-7--7-7-7-7-7-7-7-|--------------------------------------|
------------------------------------|--------------------------------------|
------------------------------------|--------------------------------------|
So what we're looking at here is an interesting example. The first 2 measures consist of this falling bass pattern where the lowest note is just being dropped down diatonically. The effect is a pretty even progression that doesn't incorperate too many jumps. The next two measures use a similar effect, but add some dissonance with the last chord that's a Bdmin. What's interesting is that Eb is actually in first inversion. One would assume that the bass would take care of the actual root of the chord, but infact, the bass in the song is following the guitar to get the descending bass effect. This is furthred with the same first inversion in the F chord. The same pattern is in the next 2 measures. With the Dm, Gm and Bdim all in first inversion, keeping the steady bass descension. In terms of actually playing this, the most economical way is as follows. For the Cm, barre the 8th fret from the 4th string to the 2nd string with your MIDDLE finger. Then place you pinky on the tenth fret. Drop the pinky for the Eb chord. Then change positions for the F chord. Place your ring finger on the seventh fret, place your index on the fifth, and place your middle on the sixth fret. For the Bb, play it (going from the 6th string up) pinky, ring, middle, then switch to the Dm with ring, pinky, middle. This is easier then doing it any other way because the next change to the Gm is the same ring, pinky, middle. The Bdim should be fingered ring, middle, pinky. The last example I'll use is from Citizen Erased off of Origin of Symmetry. This song is heavy in octaves and power chords, but is interesting because of the progression in which Bellamy uses it. Bellamy plays it with a seven string guitar, but he apparently recorded it with a six string, the sixth string tuned down to A. Live he just uses the sixth string as a drone for the A, so the tuning is AAADGBE.
e|-----------------------------------|-----------------------------------|
B|-----------------------------------|-----------------------------------|
G|-----------------------------------|-----------------------------------|
D|-----------------------------------|-----------------------------------|
A|--0-0--12--0-12-12--0-12-12-0--12--|--0-0--10--0-10-10--0-10-10-0--10--|
A|--0-0--12--0-12-12--0-12-12-0--12--|--0-0--10--0-10-10--0-10-10-0--10--|
 
e|-----------------------------------|-----------------------------------|
B|-----------------------------------|-----------------------------------|
G|-----------------------------------|-----------------------------------|
D|-----------------------------------|-----------------------------------|
A|--0-0---8--0--8--8--0--8--8-0---8--|--0-0---7--0--7--7--0--7--7-0---7--|
A|--0-0---8--0--8--8--0--8--8-0---8--|--0-0---7--0--7--7--0--7--7-0---7--|
That's the main riff after the guitar harmonic intro. Because of how the progression ends with the E chord, the over all sense of the song is more or less in the harmonic minor scale, or has simply just raised the seventh scale degree to the leading tone. But the progression is interesting because it's just a diatonic progression going down from the tonic chord ending on the implied E major. But there's also a riff being overdubbed on the recording that is Bellamy going up diatonically from the fifth string upwards. So it has this contrary motion idea being played around that leaves the actual progression somewhat open. It's not until the chorus that there is a centered progression.
e|-------------------------------------------------|
B|-------------------------------------------------|
G|-10-10-10-10-10-10-10-10--5--5--5--5--5--5--5--5-|
D|-10-10-10-10-10-10-10-10--5--5--5--5--5--5--5--5-|
A|-8--8--8--8--8--8--8--8---3--3--3--3--3--3--3--3-|
A|-8--8--8--8--8--8--8--8---3--3--3--3--3--3--3--3-|
 
e|-------------------------------------------------|
B|-------------------------------------------------|
G|-9--9--9--9--9--9--9--9--------------12-12-12-12-|
D|-9--9--9--9--9--9--9--9--7--7--7--7--12-12-12-12-|
A|-7--7--7--7--7--7--7--7--0--0--0--0--10-10-10-10-|
A|-7--7--7--7--7--7--7--7--0--0--0--0--10-10-10-10-|
 
e|-------------------------------------------------|
B|-------------------------------------------------|
G|-10-10-10-10-10-10-10-10--5--5--5--5--5--5--5--5-|
D|-10-10-10-10-10-10-10-10--5--5--5--5--5--5--5--5-|
A|-8--8--8--8--8--8--8--8---3--3--3--3--3--3--3--3-|
A|-8--8--8--8--8--8--8--8---3--3--3--3--3--3--3--3-|
 
e|-------------------------------------------------|
B|-------------------------------------------------|
G|-9--9--9--9--9--9--9--9--9--9--9--9--9--9--9--9--|
D|-9--9--9--9--9--9--9--9--9--9--9--9--9--9--9--9--|
A|-7--7--7--7--7--7--7--7--7--7--7--7--7--7--7--7--|
A|-7--7--7--7--7--7--7--7--7--7--7--7--7--7--7--7--|
What we have is an F5 going to a C5 to an E5 (that temporarly goes into this Asus2) which goes to the D5 which repeats again. So it's VI-i-V-vii progression. So, looking back on the chordal harmony aspects of Matt Bellamy's playing, we can see that he utilizes chords a lot more then just powerchords and octaves. The effect is a much more harmonic sound. He also likes to trade off using arpeggios for his verses and chords for his choruses. Another thing that will greatly help your ability in utilizing chords is to learn the CAGED system of guitar. Which breakes scales and chords down into 5 shapes. The C-shape, A-shape, G-shape, E-shape, and D-shape. Bellamy uses the CAGED system for his chords. Try and go through and pick out the shapes of each chord and what CAGED system they come from.

Arpeggios

--------- If there is one thing that always pains my envy is how fluent and articulate Matt is when playing arpeggios. I'll use 4 examples of songs that incorperate his arpeggios and go through the theoretical aspect of them as well as how to play them and use them effectively. Bellamy has said that he's always been fond of arpeggios. It's evident in his synth work as much as guitar. My favorite peice of arpeggio-work is the bridge between the first chorus and second verse of CITIZEN ERASED off of Symmytry. Because of the complexity of this excerpt. I'm going to go through each line with the explanation of what' going on as well as how to play it. But, despite what shreders will say, the most effective way to get each note in this arpeggio heard is not to sweep pick or economy pick, but to just alternate pick. Also, learning this took me a solid 2 or 3 weeks of sitting on my bed with my guitar just playing this for 15 mins at a time. The most effective way is just to memorize the chord shapes, that being the first set of sixtenth notes. (The first line is an Am chord, the second shape is a D7 chord shape. The second line is an Am7 chord...so on) then just pracitce transitioning between the shapes. After you've done that, just add the little chromatic runs in between. But don't worry about picking it out yet. Just the left hand only. After you've gotten that down. Start learning the actual way it's played and pick it out. I'll add the best way to pick it, all though it's generally all alternate picked. (+ means down; 0 means up)
                     +       + 0 + + 0 + + 0 + + 0 + + 0
-----------------------|-----5-----8-----7-----6-----5---|
-----------------------|-------5-----5-----5-----5-----5-|
--------------------2S-|--5------5-----5-----5-----5-----|
-----------------------|---------------------------------|
-----------------------|---------------------------------|
-----------------------|---------------------------------|
So, you're going to slide into the 5th fret, then hold it for an eighth note. Barre the fifth fret wiht your index finger and then just use your pinky for the eight fret, ring finger for the seventh, middle for the sixth, and so on. Your goal is to preserve the legato and let the notes ring out. The transition to the D7 requires you to let the ringing notes stop ringing. But you don't want to have a drop in any of the beats.
  D7                                  Am7                               
  +   0 + 0 + + 0 + + 0 + 0   + 0 +    +   0 + 0 + + 0 + + 0 + + 0 + + 0 
--------5-----4-----3-----------3---|--------3-----2-----1-----2-----3---|
------3---3-----3-----3-------3---3-|------1---1-----1-----1-----1-----1-|
--5---------5-----5-----5-4---------|--2---------2-----2-----2-----2-----|
------------------------------------|------------------------------------|
------------------------------------|------------------------------------|
------------------------------------|------------------------------------|
Your best way to approach this is to hit the third string, fifth fret, still in the Am position, but then to immediatly drop to the D7 position. Doing this on time is very, very hard. You're going to need to practice with a metronome. The best way to finger it is (from low string to high) ring, middle, pinky. Chromatically descend to the middle finger, then barre the 3rd fret when you get to that part of the descent. When you get to the part of the first measure where you have to drop from the fifght fret on the 3rd string to the fourth fret. Use your middle finger as the finger to fet the fourth fret. Slide down to the Am7. And do the same position for the chromatic descents, but when you go back up just do the inverse.
  Fdim
  + 0 + 0 + 0 + 0 + 0 + 0 + 0 + 0
------4-------4-------------------|------5-----6-----7-----8-----7---|
----3---3---3---3-----3-----3-----|----5---5-----5-----5-----5-----5-|
--4-------4---------4-----4-----4-|--5-------5-----5-----5-----5-----|
------------------3-----3-----2---|----------------------------------|
----------------------------------|----------------------------------|
----------------------------------|----------------------------------|
Finger wise, the F dim should be fingered as index, ring, middle, pinky.
------7-----8-----9-----10-----9---|
----8---8-----8-----8------8-----0-|
--7-------7-----7-----7------7-----|
-----------------------------------|
-----------------------------------|
-----------------------------------|
Just use your pinky here for all the chromatic ascents.
                                                   |--3--|                 
                                                           N.H.           
--------8-------9-------10-------11-------12----|-----------12------------|
-----10---10------10-------10-------10-------10-|--------9----------------|
--10---------10------10-------10-------10-------|-----9-------------------|
------------------------------------------------|--9----------------------|
------------------------------------------------|-------------------------|
------------------------------------------------|-------------------------|
Finger it as ring, pinky, index. And then ascend with your middle finger. Barr the 101010 part with your index and then ascend with your middle then ring. Tap it all off with the nice tripilet that you can barre from the 4th string down and add the 12th fret harmonic as soon as you let all the strings go. As you can see, extremely liberal use of chromatic passing tones, but it makes the song sound some what eerie, but not making it sound really "metal" or bad. The next example is a look at Bellamy using just simple chord shapes as an acompianment to the bass. All of the picking should be (+0+ +0+ +0+) You want to repeat the downstroke when you jump the strings.
   Gm                                              
--------10-------10-------10-------10-------10----|
-----------11-------11-------11-------11-------11-|
-----12-------12-------12-------12-------12-------|
--12----------------------------------------------|
--------------------------------------------------|
--------------------------------------------------|
Finger this as ring, pinky, middle, index. Keep it clear and let the notes ring out. It takes some practice but is easy after a while.
   Gm7                                              
------10-------10-------10-------10-------10-------|
---------11-------11-------11-------11-------11----|
------------10-------10-------10-------10-------10-|
--12-----------------------------------------------|
---------------------------------------------------|
---------------------------------------------------|
The transition is simple. Just finger this like a normal D shape chord but keep the D on the 12th fret in the bass.
   D#                                              
-----11-------11-------11-------11-------11-------|
--------11-------11-------11-------11-------11----|
-----------12-------12-------12-------12-------12-|
--13----------------------------------------------|
--------------------------------------------------|
--------------------------------------------------|
This is a normal F-shape chord. Finger it as such and let it ring.
   D                                               
-----10-------10-------10-------10-------10-------|
--------10-------10-------10-------10-------10----|
-----------11-------11-------11-------11-------11-|
--12----------------------------------------------|
--------------------------------------------------|
--------------------------------------------------|
...and slide it all down half a step

   Gm                      D#                      
--------------10----------------------11----------|
--------11-------11----11-------11-------11----11-|
-----12----12-------12-------12----12-------12----|
--12----------------------13----------------------|
--------------------------------------------------|
--------------------------------------------------|
This is just transitioning back to the Gm shape (I remember it as the inversed F shape) to the D# (F shape) chord.
   F7                                              
--------------11----------11----------11----------|
--------10-------10----10----10----10----10----10-|
-----10----10-------10----------10----------10----|
--10----------------------------------------------|
--------------------------------------------------|
--------------------------------------------------|
This is a simple fingering. Barre all the notes on the 10th fret with your index and add the eleventh fret in with your middle.
   Gm7                                              
---------------10----------10----------10----------|
---------11-------11----11----11----11----11----11-|
------10----10-------10----------10----------10----|
--12-----------------------------------------------|
---------------------------------------------------|
---------------------------------------------------|
And back to the simple D shape.
--------------10----------10----------10----------|
--------11-------11----11----11----11----11----11-|
-----10----10-------10----------10----------10----|
--12----------------------------------------------|
--------------------------------------------------|
--------------------------------------------------|
The only hard part about this song is remebering the chords. But I like to remember them in shapes. (Inverse F shape. D shape chord. F shape chord. F shape chord down half a step. Inverse F shape to first F shape chord. To the F7 chord back to the D shape chord.) Easy. The hard part is keeping it clean and fluid. For some other songs that incorperate arpeggios, look at Micro Cuts and Dead Star.

Matt Bellamy's Riffs

-------------------- Many have argued that Bellamy has brought back riff rock. Plug in Baby off of Origin of Symmetry has been placed in the top 10 of best riffs ever over Eric Clapton and Jimmy Page. I'll highlight on 4 examples that showcase, in my opinion, some of Bellamy's best riffs and explain how he plays them and their use. Plug in Baby is possibly Muse's most popular song. Everyone who owns a Fuzz Factory wants to play this riff. It's actually somewhat challenging because it's played at a brisk tempo and requires lots of string movement and articulate playing. Before I go on, I want to stress some things. First, keeping in position is crucial. You're index finger should never leave the sixth fret in terms of position until I say you should. Also, finger strength is crucial here. There is a bend that is kind of awkward and several hammer ons and pull offs that require you to have to use your middle and ring fingers. Pratice with a metronome! And use alternate picking.
|------------------------------|
|------------------------------|
|------------6--------6--7-----|
|--8------9-----8--9--------9--|
|------------------------------|
|------------------------------|
Using your middle and ring finger, start off with the riff using alternate picking.
-----------------------------|--------------------------|
-----------7h-8p-7-----------|--------------------------|
--6--7--9-----------9--7--6--|-----6--7-----6--7--9--6--|
-----------------------------|--9--------9--------------|
-----------------------------|--------------------------|
-----------------------------|--------------------------|
When you come to the h/p part, do it just as notated. Pluck the second 7 and hit the 9 on the downstroke.
-----------------------------|--------------------------|
--------7--7h-8p-7--6--7--6--|--7-----------------7--9--|
--7--9-----------------------|-----7-----------7--------|
-----------------------------|--------7-----7-----------|
-----------------------------|-----------9--------------|
-----------------------------|--------------------------|
Same principle here. But when you do the 7676 part, use your index to slide back and forth between the 2 (I mean slide as in just alternating, it should be picked, not slid). This makes the barre on the 7th fret a lot easier. Hit the barre with the index finger, making sure to let it ring. Hit the half-bend with your ring finger.
----------------------------|
--9br--L--7--6--7-----------|
-------------------7--6--7--|
----------------------------|
----------------------------|
----------------------------|
Use the same technique on the 767 part again, except on the second 7 on the 2nd string, go back into position, so you're hiting the 3rd string sixth fret with your index and the seventh fret with your middle finger so you can do the riff again as needed. So that's the riff. To be honest, I still have a hard time playing it fluently. I generally have to have warmed up enough before I can nail it. It's a great riff though. Have fun with that one. The next riff I wanna look at is The Groove riff. It's very vocal in the use of octaves and chromatic runs. What I'll do, because this requires lots of position changes is I'll place the number of the finger you need to play. (1 for index, 2 for middle. 3 for ring and 4 for pinky.
   1    4   1 1 3   3 2 1
|---------------------------|
|---------------------------|
|-------------2-------------|
|-------4--------4----------|
|-------------------4-3-2---|
|--2--------2---------------|
 
                                              |--3--|        
       4     1  3  2  3          1       1  2 1  2  1 2   1 
-------------------------|----------------------------------|
-------------------------|----------------------------------|
----------------6--------|----------------------------------|
-------7-----------------|--------------------7h-9p-7-------|
--0--------0-4-----5--6--|-------7-------7h-9---------9--7h-|
-------------------------|--0---------0---------------------|
 
  2    2     2  1  2  1 2    
---------------------------|
---------------------------|
---------------------------|
-------------9--7----------|
--9----9--L--------9-7-9\--|
---------------------------|
So what Bellamy is doing here is more or less outlining an octave and then jumping up and down the chromatic notes around it. It's a pretty cool riff. The final riff that I want to take a look at is Stockholm Syndrome. Possibly one of their hardest riffs to keep in time because of how fast it is. I still can barely hold it together, but by itself, it's fairly easy to play. While I did write for you to pull off, you should pull off along with plucking the string because it's much easier to do and more effeciant and fluent. I'll write down how I'd recommend you finger it. It doesn't follow the position, but it helps because your using the strongest fingers.
      2     3       2      1
E||-----------------------------------------------------------|
B||-----------------------------------------------------------|
G||-----------------------------------------------------------|
D||-----------------------------------------------------------|
A||-----------------------------------------------------------|
D||--12p-0h-13p-0h-12p-0h-10h-12p-0h-0h-13p-0h-12p-0h-10h-12h-|
 
                                            1   2   1 
----------------------------------------------------------|
----------------------------------------------------------|
----------------------------------------------------------|
----------------------------------------------------------|
----------------------------------------------------------|
--0h-0h-13p-0h-12p-0h-10h-12p-0h-0h-13p-0h-16h-17p-16p-0h-|

How Matt Bellamy Acheives His Sound

------------------------------------ Matt Bellamy is not only a brilliant musican, but he's also a sonic archetict, on level with the Edge from U2. The core of his sound is not with his amp, like most guitarists are. It's with his guitar. He utilizes a custom line of guitars built by Manson Co. Each guitar is tailored to a specific need. However, the generally either contain a Fuzz Factory or a Kaoss Pad. The Fuzz Factory is what drives most of the overdrive on Origin of Symmtry. The Fuzz Factory is a little fuzz pedal built by Zvex Pedals that allows the user to control the gain, feedback, oscilation, gate, and compression (more or less) with the turn of a knob. It's a pretty complicated pedal, and Bellamy has it built into his guitar with the Stab and Compression knobs being visible. The settings for Plug in Baby are: Plug in Baby: Radio Fuzz setting (7:00 10:00 12:00 12:00) (from the left to right, not including volume) Bliss, New Born, that sort are: (Gate as needed, 7:00 11:30 5:00) Citizen Erased Tone: Gate: 10:45 Comp: 2:00 Drive: 5:00 Stab: 1:30 (lower volume pots for a cleaner sound on heavier parts of song) As for the Kaoss Pad, that's what's responsible for the Map of the Problematique effect, and loads more. They're made by running the pad into a computer to output the sound. ------------------------------------- Anyways. Thanks for reading this. Please comment and rate. If you have any questions, please feel free to message me. Thanks!
More Weeping_Demon7 lessons:
+ Brian Aubert Of Silversun Pickups Guitar Gurus 06/29/2010
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