3-Note Sequence Ideas. Part 2

author: Paul Tauterouff date: 10/06/2009 category: guitar techniques
rating: 10 / votes: 15 
In this lesson we are going to combine the forward and reverse three-note sequence combinations from my Three-Note Sequence Ideas Part I lesson to create even more interesting sounds. If you have not read that lesson, I recommend reviewing it here before trying these examples. It will make it much easier for you to follow this lesson. Also, don't just skim through the lesson - pick up your guitar and actually try the examples!!! This is the way to get the most value from it! So pick up your guitar now and then we'll continue. Example One alternates between typical three-note groupings and the reversed three-note sequence from Part I. I know it sounds complicated at first, but it's pretty easy to grasp once you play through it a few times. Example Two is the descending version of Example One. I think it has a fun "Irish" sort of sound to it! Want a Free E-book of this lesson plus other free guitar lessons and jam tracks? Click Here! Example Three switches the order of things - here we play the reversed three-note grouping first and then alternate between it and the typical grouping. This is really unique sounding! Example Four is the descending version of Example Three. This is a far cry from the original patterns we started with in Part I of this lesson! Be sure to experiment with these sequences using:
  • All 5 patterns of the pentatonic scale
  • Hammers and pulls
  • 16th note triplets (6 notes per beat) For more information on sequencing variations I highly recommend checking out this article here on UG by my friend Tommaso Zillio. It will give you a wealth of ideas for creating variations in your solos! Applying Sequences To other Scale Patterns So now let's apply these alternating sequences to the three-note per string Aeolian mode (natural minor scale) in the key of A. I have included the pattern below in case you don't know it. The 3NPS Aeolian Mode in A: Now that you have the scale shape down let's apply the sequences to it. Example Five - alternates our typical three-note groupings and reversed three-note sequence, this time using the minor scale. Let's take a closer look at exactly what we are playing here so that we can apply it to other scale patterns: 1. We are playing three notes up the scale (typical pattern) 2. We move up one note and play three descending notes (reversed pattern) 3. Move up one note in the scale and repeat steps 1 and 2 as desired. Just to clarify: the reversed Pattern is a three-note sequence in the opposite direction that you are moving in the scale. This means that the reverse pattern is descending when you are moving up the scale and is ascending when you are coming down the scale. Example Six - is basically the descending version of Example Six's forward/ reverse combo. Now let's twist things around!!! Example Seven - switches the order of things - here we play the reversed three-note grouping first and then alternate between it and the typical grouping. This is a really cool sound! Let's analyze Example Seven as we did with Example Five: 1. We start three notes into the scale and play three descending notes (reverse pattern) 2. We move up one note and play three ascending notes (typical pattern) 3. Move up one note in the scale and repeat steps 1 and 2 as desired. Example Eight - is the descending version of Example Seven. Get Free Guitar Lessons like this one from me here. I hope you have enjoyed this lesson and that it gives you some new ideas for soloing. If you find it difficult to play the examples in time, simply practice them without worrying about the timing at first. Then once you become comfortable with the sequences you can focus on the timing. As always, practice the concepts and ideas discussed here to generate your own licks in different keys and with various positions of the pentatonic scales and modes. Thank you for reading and thanks to Ultimate Guitar for posting this for me! Happy jamming and see you soon! 2009 Paul Tauterouff All Rights Reserved. Used by Permission.
  • More Paul Tauterouff lessons:
    + 3-Note Sequence Ideas Guitar Techniques 08/12/2009
    + Open String Flash Licks Master Class Guitar Techniques 03/20/2009
    + Pentamodal Idea Guitar Techniques 09/18/2008
    Comments
    Your captcha is incorrect