Buckethead Magic Shred Lick Fully Explained

author: DiabolusMusica5 date: 07/25/2011 category: soloing
rating: 10 / votes: 9 
First things first, I must tip my hat to UG/utube user "tapPOOH" b/c without his help, I wouldn't have been able to get this far on these sequences. So with that said, Here we go! So, as previously mentioned Buckethead uses these for pretty much every solo he plays. In order to get to the point where you can zip up and down the fret-board like him, I have broken it down into a couple steps Step 1.) Get this lick under your fingers...It doesn't really matter what key you first learn it in...but I'll show it you in 2 keys anyway... This same lick shown in both A and D minor, consists of 18 notes that are three sets of 16th notes triplets. So there are to be 6 evenly spaced notes per beat for 3 beats for one run through this lick..(Buckethead makes his solos w/ strings of these things)
A Minor
   d    u         d u d u d     u
E|------5h7h8p7p5---5-8-7-8p7p5-------|
B|-5h6h8----------8-------------8p6p5-|
G|o----------------------------------o|
D|o-BucketheadLoopstheselicks--------o|
A|------------------------------------|
E|------------------------------------|
 
The same thing, but transposed to D Minor
 
    d      u              d   u  d  u d        u
E|---------10h12h13p12p10----10-13-12-13p12p10---------|
B|-10h11h13---------------13------------------13p11p10-|
G|o---------------------------------------------------o|
D|o---------------------------------------------------o|
A|-----------------------------------------------------|
E|-----------------------------------------------------|
One other common variation on this pattern that Buckethead tosses into these strings of sequences to make them sound more spontanteous goes like this
 d        u              d  u  d    u      
E|---------10h12h13p12p10|---10-13p10-12h13p12p10--|
B|-10h11h13--------------|-13----------------------|
G|-----------------------|o-----------------------o|
D|It-takes-off-as-normal-|o--but-he-loops-a-few---o|
A|-----------------------|----of-these-in----------|
E|-----------------------|-------------------------|
Getting these cleanly and gracefully under your fingertips and then upwards of 120 B.P.M. w/ a metronome as 16th note triplets concludes step 1.) Step 2.) Become familiar w/ how to play these kinds of licks in key all over the neck. Recall the first example that I gave in A Minor, this is pretty much the same idea in A Minor, but its just on a different part of the neck.
A Minor
    d       u             d   u  d u  d       u
E|---------12h13h15p13p12----12-15-13-15p13p12---------|
B|-12h13h15---------------15------------------15p13p12-|
G|o---------------------------------------------------o|
D|o---------------------------------------------------o|
A|-----------------------------------------------------|
E|-----------------------------------------------------|
Step 3.) Learn to construct little "bridge" patterns so that you can play these in solos across the neck (so that way you aren't always stuck playing these in the same position) Heres another example in D minor but with these "bridge" patterns to maintain a seem-less flow while changing hand position
E|-----------------------------------------------------------
B|--------------Sequence#1-----------------------------------
G|o--------------------------------------------continue-onto-
D|o-----7h8h10p8p7--7-10-8-10p8p7--------------next-tab-line-
A|(7h8h10---------10------------10p8p7)-(7h8h10)-------------
E|------------------------------------3-note-bridge----------
  
E|------------------------------------------|
B|----------------Sequence#2----------------|
G|o-------7h9h10p9p7--7-10-9-10p9p7--------o|
D|o-(7h8h10---------10-------------10p8p7)-o|
A|------------------------------------------|
E|------------------------------------------|
Step 4.) Get used to playing through sequences of these with asymetrical rhythmic figurings. -Buckethead doesn't always play these as 16th note triplets...sometime he plays them as septuplets,quintuplets,octuplets, or alternates btw/sextuplets & quintuplets. When he does this, it sort of causes what I can only call a "jilt" in these sequences; and in doing so makes them more interesting. Hope this helps (-: -Nicholas Jacquet
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