Wonderful Tonight: George Harrison, Eric Clapton, And Me Review

artist: Pattie Boyd date: 12/10/2007 category: books
Pattie Boyd: Wonderful Tonight: George Harrison, Eric Clapton, And Me
By waiting more than 20 years to break her silence, Boyd has managed to steer clear of the rancor that attends most tomes of this sort. The book's great beauty lies in how fair-minded she is toward all its characters.
 Richness of Content: 9
 Style: 9
 Overall Impression: 9
 Overall rating:
 8.3 
 Reviewer rating:
 9 
 Users rating:
 7.6 
 Votes:
 9 
review (1) 28 comments vote for this book:
overall: 9
Wonderful Tonight: George Harrison, Eric Clapton, And Me Reviewed by: UG Team, on december 10, 2007
4 of 4 people found this review helpful

Richness of Content: The world may never know the identity of the girl Who inspired Doug Fieger of The Knack to write the one-hit wonder My Sharona (although it's safe to wager that her name was Sharona), but we do know Pattie Boyd, the early Sixties British It girl whose profound beauty so besotted the esteemed guitarists (and husbands) George Harrison and Eric Clapton that they penned enduring classics such as Something, Layla, and Wonderful Tonight as paeans to the way they she woo-wooed them. In this witty, seductive, and impossible-to-put-down memoir, Boyd and co-author Penny Junor recount an incredible love triangle against a backdrop of unparalleled cultural history. For Beatlemaniacs, it's yet another must-read. But surprisingly, it's more than that: it's the story of a young woman whose life was changed in innumerable and profound ways, not only by music, but by her relationships with two of the men responsible for it. // 9

Style: Boyd was no more than 20 when she was swept into the staggering zeitgeist of the Beatles and Swinging London. Her recollections of the heady times, when it seemed as if groundbreaking music and art were being made on a daily basis, are sharp and filled with meticulous details. More important, Boyd's portrait of life within that most rarified of inner circles, the Beatles, is emotionally direct, unsparing, and generous. Whereas most rock-star memoirs (or memoirs of ex-wives of rock stars) read like Wikipedia chronologies, Boyd engages the reader into a kind of conspiratorial intimacy, writing about the mysterious colors of love and friendships and how the choices we make often can't be articulated or rationalized -- only felt. The tale culminates with her painful decision to end her marriage to Harrison and answer the desperate pleas of Clapton (Harrison's friend, no less), whose yearning for Boyd was limitless in it's intensity. Although Boyd pulls no punches with both ex-husbands' shortcomings (Harrison's infidelities and Clapton's multiple addictions), her tone is one of understanding and forgiveness. // 9

Overall Impression: By waiting more than 20 years to break her silence, Boyd has managed to steer clear of the rancor that attends most tomes of this sort. The book's great beauty lies in how fair-minded she is toward all its characters. This is due, in large part, to the passage of time that has elapsed since the events unfolded -- wounds that were once raw are now healed. In penning such a warm and openhearted tell-all, Boyd remains just as irresistible today as when she won the hearts of hip young men the world over. // 9

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