Apologize For Nothing Review

artist: Bobaflex date: 10/04/2005 category: compact discs
Bobaflex: Apologize For Nothing
Released: Aug 23, 2005
Label: TVT
Genres: Alternative Metal, Rap-Metal, Hard Rock
Number Of Tracks: 12
Apologize For Nothing is fairly diverse, surprising, oddly soulful in places, and musically ambitious.
 Sound: 10
 Lyrics: 8
 Overall Impression: 8
 Overall rating:
 6.4 
 Reviewer rating:
 8.7 
 Users rating:
 4.1 
 Votes:
 57 
review (1) 2 comments vote for this album:
overall: 8.7
Apologize For Nothing Reviewed by: UG Team, on october 04, 2005
1 of 32 people found this review helpful

Sound: If I start describing what Bobaflex sounds like, you're never gonna imagine it. It's on one of those weird bands that like mixing up styles and write songs of whatever comes to their minds, willing to try anything that sounds good. But, unlike their predecessors, they managed to do something a lot bands tried to and sucked hard. Brothers Shaun McCoy (guitar, lead vocals) and Marty McCoy (the same) grew up in a country-side around redneck culture. At the time their musical preferences were forming, there wasn't anything trendy going on. Nobody told them what is right and what is wrong and what you should and shouldn't do in writing music. They didn't have any idols to follow and be like. So, when it came to composing music, there were no musical limitations for them and they managed to invent the sound of their own, mixing everything the way only rednecks can. "Apologize For Nothing" is the band's sophomore album on TVT records. It's a level higher than their first attempt "Primitive Epic" (and ten minutes longer! Every song on the album is short and tight and all together 12 tracks are only 35 minutes, but they are made with such great intense, that it seems like a whole hour of storm in your ears. You'll get a lot of thick metal riffs and melodic vocals. The songs are drum-driven and the beats jumps from hip-hop to hard rock. The album has some great instrumentals and hook style riffs. Bury opener "Six Feet Under Ground" has hard hitting guitars and hard drums. "Better Than Me" starts with the sound of somebody sniffing your ears, which actually feels very nice. Some people say it's an anthem for all West Virginians (where the band is originally from), but it really sounds like a mess of words to me. "Guns Ablazin'" is a bit funky. In "The Guardian" the voice (sorry, don't have a clue which one of them is singing in this song) sounds like it's crooning out of his guts. For some reasons (maybe they thought the listener underestimated their efforts) they put on this CD two songs from their previous album "Medicine" and "Turn The Heat Up," having distortion as the only improvement. The CD guarantee you a huge portion of adrenalin and genuine spark of energy. // 10

Lyrics: The lyrics sound like they're singing about everything they see. It reminded me of a drug-addict guy, being high, seeing devils, dragons and other s--t, with his thoughts spinning around and he's yelling out some of them, so you can only guess what kind of pink elephants he's watching now. "There's a teenage girl, she's fucking high on drugs/I think she's driving my truck/I don't care, I live the way I wanna." Very logically. The songs abound with phrases like "So I've been with a prostitute" (from the same song "Better Than Me") What a revelation! The subjects are weird, invented by a perverted mind as well ? violent sex, prostitutes, mother with dragon wings (featuring her naked drawing in the CD booklet) and brother without any physical form, who hates to be ignored, even a song about The Second World War. All together that makes "Apology For Nothing." "Family" is a heart-piercing song about relatives. The stupidity of the lyrics made me laugh at times. The song is a proud owner of the dumbest lyrics I've heard lately. The awkward lyrics are compensated by colorful multi-tiered vocals. Having four singers (out of five members, apparently only drummer doesn't sing), the band has a great opportunity to create any sound their sophisticated minds can invent. They play around, shifting from gruff distortion screams to high-pitched melody falsetto. The band admits "It's all about the vocal line and the melody for us." // 8

Overall Impression: What I loved the band for is their originality and creativity. Bobaflex has a unique ability to mix styles, their good sense in experimentalism help them to write extremely experimenting songs without making them sound awkward. Listening to the album you get the feeling that you're listening to something new, yet very familiar. They managed to combine elements of a whole bunch of everything -? funk, grunge, metal, hardcore. Being completely serious about what they're doing, the band still can keep music fun. Due to Shaun's passion to comic books, there are some comics-style pictures, facing some tracks in the CD booklet. The CD cover has all musicians (you can guess who is who by the hair style only 'cause the face is a black mess with a couple red dots instead of eyes) and thin-sown forest on top. That's probably where all the "dark business" the musicians are dreaming about is being performed. The CD is well composed put together, though the band still needs to work on lyrics. // 8

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