Aladdin Sane Review

artist: david bowie date: 01/15/2004 category: compact discs
david bowie: Aladdin Sane
Released: 1973
Genre: Rock
Tones: Brash, Ironic, Wry, Eerie, Detached, Theatrical, Exuberant, Witty, Provocative
Styles: Hard Rock, Prog-Rock/Art Rock, Glam Rock, Pop/Rock, Proto-Punk
Number Of Tracks: 10
 Sound: 8
 Lyrics: 8
 Overall Impression: 8
 Overall rating:
 8.7 
 Reviewer rating:
 8 
 Users rating:
 9.3 
 Votes:
 12 
review (1) 3 comments vote for this album:
overall: 8
Aladdin Sane Reviewed by: Hevoc, on january 15, 2004
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: His earlier albums, Hunky Dory and the Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust, inexplicably receive more acclaimed, but Aladdin Sane is the peak of David Bowie's heavily influential glam rock phase. With a fantastic back-up band, a keen knowledge of many pop structures (doo-wop, jazz, blues and rock all play integral parts in the album) and a sleek, sexy sound, the androgynous, charismatic, make-up clad singer struts through the glam rock's world of raucous partying ("Watch That Man" "Drive-In Saturday"), trashy decadence ("Cracked Actor," "Time") and champagne-scented romance ("Lady Grinning Soul," the title track) as if he owned it all. The album is one of Bowie's best, as well as a practical bible for all the young dudes whom would follow him into the weird, wonderful world of glitzy artrock. His earlier albums, Hunky Dory and the Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust, inexplicably receive more acclaimed, but Aladdin Sane is the peak of David Bowie's heavily influential glam rock phase. With a fantastic back-up band, a keen knowledge of many pop structures (doo-wop, jazz, blues and rock all play integral parts in the album) and a sleek, sexy sound, the androgynous, charismatic, make-up clad singer struts through the glam rock's world of raucous partying ("Watch That Man" "Drive-In Saturday"), trashy decadence ("Cracked Actor," "Time") and champagne-scented romance ("Lady Grinning Soul," the title track) as if he owned it all. The album is one of Bowie's best, as well as a practical bible for all the young dudes whom would follow him into the weird, wonderful world of glitzy artrock. // 8

Lyrics: Drive In Saturday-This is a suprising one, harkens back to his influences of the late 50's and early 60's sounds very American, but maybe that was the point. Panic In Detroit-One of the greatest Bowie songs of all time, full of social commentary and the music blows T-Rex and his glam jam out of the water. Cracked Actor-Most people know this one, very glam oriented but again, you hear some of that Philly sound creeping in. Fabulous imagery with the lyrics. Really gives you a sense of the era. Time-Another Bowie classic, I mean "Time, in quaaludes and red wine"? Who can rhyme like that? Very sweeping piano. The Prettiest Star-Written for Angela (lord knows why). This one goes way back to the 50's sound, almost doo-wop at points. Let's Spend the Night Together-Well, it is a redux, not a bad one, pretty good spin of his own on it but probably the weakest song on the CD. The Jean Genie-AMAZING, to this day isn't it? The lyrics, the music arrangement. Glam-Deluxe! Lady Grinning Soul-Another piano driven track which believe it or not is my favorite on here. // 8

Overall Impression: Simply put, this is one of the greatest Bowie album ever recorded. // 8

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