John Prine Review

artist: john prine date: 10/29/2007 category: compact discs
Release Date: 1971
Label: Atlantic
Genres: Singer/Songwriter, Contemporary Folk, Progressive Folk, Folk-Rock
Number Of Tracks: 13
Prine's 1971 self-titled debut set the tone for the rest of his career. A critical smash and a commercial disappointment, the record contains many of his best known compositions.
 Sound: 10
 Lyrics: 10
 Overall Impression: 9
 Overall rating:
 4.9 
 Reviewer rating:
 9.7 
 Users rating:
 0 
 Votes:
 0 
review (1) 3 comments vote for this album:
overall: 9.7
John Prine Reviewed by: LedDaveZeppelin, on october 29, 2007
2 of 2 people found this review helpful

Sound: John Prines' first album came out thirty-six years ago. I've been listening to him for six years now, and still today when I listen to this album it amazes me. I get the same feelings and emotions as I did the first time I heard it. John Prines' music has such an individual sound. Better yet he has his own unique sound. Consisting of genres such as bluegrass, folk, county, and acoustic rock. The First time you hear this album it will absolutly stun you. Many songs on this album use Lap steel guitar, which is very soothing and relaxing. He also uses stand up bass and very odd picking patterns to create some of the most memerable tunes ever. // 10

Lyrics: The most amazing part about this album are the lyrics. They are unforgetable. When this album first came out many people considered him as the "New Bob Dylan". In every song the lyrics fit in perfectly with the music. After listening to the lyrics you feel as if you know John Prine personally. The vocals are somewhat simple and rough. Its something you have to get used to. "Sam Stone" is a song on the album that really shows how impressive his lyrics are. It is a song about a man that became addicted to drugs in the Vietnam War. It was a pretty heavy song back then and still is today. "Sam Stone came home from his wife and family,/After serving in the conflict overseas./And the time that he served, had shattered all his nerves,/And left a little shrapnel in his knee./But the morphine eased the pain, and the grass grew round his brain,/And gave him all the confidence he lacked,/With a Purple Heart and a monkey on his back./There's a hole in daddy's arm where all the money goes,/Jesus Christ died for nothing I suppose./Little pitchers have big ears, don't stop to count the years,/Sweet songs never last too long on broken radios." // 10

Overall Impression: This album has to be one of my all time favorites. A few songs start to get boing after a while but the rest stand strong. "Quiet Man" has to be the best song on this album, mostly because I completely relate to it. If this CD was stolen I would definatly buy it again. // 9

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