Houses Of The Holy Review

artist: led zeppelin date: 08/25/2008 category: compact discs
led zeppelin: Houses Of The Holy
Released: Mar 28, 1973
Genre: Rock
Tones: Eerie, Visceral, Aggressive, Confident, Poignant, Ominous, Intense, Ethereal
Styles: Blues-Rock, Hard Rock, Heavy Metal, British Metal
Number Of Tracks: 8
 Sound: 9.4
 Lyrics: 9.2
 Overall Impression: 9.5
 Overall rating:
 9.5 
 Reviewer rating:
 9.4 
 Users rating:
 9.6 
 Votes:
 62 
reviews (13) 32 comments vote for this album:
overall: 9.3
Houses Of The Holy Reviewed by: Da Jerk, on october 10, 2005
5 of 6 people found this review helpful

Sound: Led Zeppelin's most diverse album, Houses Of The Holy, was released in 1973. As with most of their albums, it was attacked by critics but still managed to sell extremely well. The sound is awesome, but at times seems a bit tinny. Examples are Robert Plant's voice in The Song Remains The Same and The Ocean. But this won't affect the enjoyment of the songs, which are completely different from the last. The aforementioned The Song Remains The Same features some incredible guitar work by Jimmy Page (and was even better live), The Rain Song is one of their most beautiful tracks ever, complete with strings, acoustic guitars, and a carefree, "we live in a perfect world" atmosphere (except for the winter section). Over The Hills And Far Away is a perfect mix of folk and hard rock, The Crunge is pure funk, Dancing Days is an Eastern-influenced rocker, D'yer Mak'er is almost a mock-reggae, No Quarter (the best song on the album) is a prog-influenced epic with lyrics similar to Immigrant Song and some of John Paul Jones' best keyboard work, and while The Ocean may sound like your standard Zeppelin rocker at first, it includes a 50's-style doo-wop section at the end. This shows that Zeppelin could succeed at almost any style they wanted, not just hard rock and folk. // 9

Lyrics: The best lyrics on Houses Of The Holy are easily found on The Rain Song and No Quarter. The former has some of the most beautiful and creative lyrics I've ever heard. Look them up, it works just as well as a poem. No Quarter has a darker feel to it, with lyrics about hope even through dark times. The Song Remains The Same is also a highlight, with lyrics telling about the experiences (and different styles of music) Zeppelin encountered while visiting different parts of the world. The only weak lyrics are found on D'yer Mak'er, and even those are entertaining. // 10

Overall Impression: This is one of my favorite Zeppelin albums. Every song is amazing in its own right. I wouldn't recommend it as the first Zeppelin album to buy; the fourth album is a better choice. However, it's a must-have for any Zeppelin fan. It showed that Zeppelin was more than just your average band, they were rock gods. // 9

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overall: 9.3
Houses Of The Holy Reviewed by: Zoso12, on november 26, 2005
4 of 5 people found this review helpful

Sound: This Zeppelin Album has a softer sound from the other previous Led Zeppelin albums. It has some of thier greatest songs: 01. The Song Remians The Same - starts out wish a sharp hit to the senses with a guitar. after jumping around for a few seconds, it goes right into the main riff. This song has almost a hectic feeling to it, with so many rythms and things going on at once. its just a wonderful mix of emotions. 02. The Rain Song - a truly wonderful song. A slower song, which may deter more "hard rock" listeners. It flows beautifully, it starts out with relaxing, seperated chords, which is a wonderful break from a slightly more hectic song above. The words are wonderful, the beat, and all over feeling, is very relaxing 03. Over The Hills And Far Away - another great song. Full of changes and intresting rythms. To any true music theory studier, it has a very simple time signature, which is made complex by abnormal beats. It starts out with an acoustic sound, followed by a 12 string sound which, just emphasizes the tune, then followed by lyrics-the first words you'll be saying from now on after the first time hearing it "hey lady!" it then changes to a rocking beat and then a whole nother beat and back to a slow finish. 04. The Crunge - an ok song, not as famous as the rest but not bad. It's a blusey song, they could have done more with the tune but theres not really much to say about it. 05. Dancing Days - this song starts out assulting your ears with two wonderfully ear wrenching notes, then gets to the tune. Kind of a "wierder" sounding song, but good never the less. 06. D'yer Mak'er - a super catchy song! I personally love it, it has more of a raggae beat to it. You'll be singing 'oh oh oh oh oh ohHhh" for hours on end! On the "poppier" side also, but its a great song. 07. No Quarter - kind of a stranger song. Could bemore for the drug side of music. Its a keyboard song with a kind of, shaking beat. There is barely any singing. Its on the quieter side, but it's also a pretty good song. I don't listen to it that much, you need to be in a certain mood to listen to it. 08. The Ocean - starts out with a quiet murmer of talking in the background, then busts out into the main riff. The guitar has a very cool tone to it. Robert Plant uses his Higher voice for this song and it gels well with the guitar tone. Half way thru the song, it cuts quite and robert hums the tune, then Bursts right back into the Riff. After another set of lyrics, it goes into a completely new tune thats kind of a fun beat. It's a great song all together, and a great way to end a great album. // 9

Lyrics: Robert Plant does some great singing in this Album, from songs like the rain song, with his mellower voice, to The Ocean with his high voice. The lyrics area all good, I don't know what else to say, Robert PLant is one of the greatest, most originial singers ever. // 9

Overall Impression: This is one of the greater Led Zeppelin Albums, I'd have to say. Almost all of the songs on this album are worth owning. The most impressive songs would have to be The Ocean and Over The Hills and Far Away. This is overall a great album and I love almost every part of it. If it was lost I'd definitaly buy it again. A great album. // 10

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overall: 10
Houses Of The Holy Reviewed by: SethMegadefan, on march 01, 2006
1 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sound: With the release of the massively successful and mainstream "Led Zeppelin IV" in 1971, it was clear that Led Zeppelin were not the same blues rock band that they seemed to be in their previous albums. I'll admit that throughout the course of their first four releases, Led Zeppelin were maturing and broadening, but in my opinion, it wasn't until 1973's "Houses Of The Holy" that Led Zeppelin really started to experiment with their sound and meld together the best that they could possibly muster. It is possibly the first instance of a great Led Zeppelin album; and by no means the last. Drawing musical and lyrical influences from a stunningly wide variety of styles, it is immediately evident that Led Zeppelin are a changing and maturing band right from the album's opener, "The Song Remains The Same." Not exactly the most farfetched song on the album, it's still a departure from the band's previous sound. Acoustic tracks, powerhouse epics, and just plain rocking songs fill the album in a way that was previously unprecedented for Zeppelin at the time. "Over The Hills And Far Away" is a wonderful and almost country-like softer track, and is no doubt a Zep classic. "The Rain Song" is an odd but still enjoyable and mellow acoustic track. "The Ocean" is an (for lack of a more professional term) awesome and classic Zeppelin rocker, delivering the goods and being one of the album's highlights. Just the way the album sounds is so incredible. The fact that the band wrote differently and more diverse for the album is good enough, but it was also produced so well that as a whole the whole album delivers. A lot. // 10

Lyrics: Lyrically, the band made a stunning jump from the near-clich songs of IV, like "Rock And Roll" and "Black Dog." The song concepts themselves are so unique that it really makes the album shine, but the way some of the lyrics are written makes it all the more enjoyable. There are a few exceptions, of course, like the oddball randomness of "Dancing Days" (e.g. "I saw a lion, he was standing alone/And a tadpole in a jar"), but overall the immense effort it must've taken to take the lyrics to a whole other level is evident, and the effort was well worthwhile. // 10

Overall Impression: Overall, I feel that the album was more a transition of sounds from "Led Zeppelin IV" and "Physical Graffiti" (arguably one of the band's best releases); in much the same way Radiohead's "The Bends" showed a turn point in their sound. The album probably isn't Zeppelin's best, but I wouldn't hesitate to put it in my top 5 favorites list; perhaps even top 3. Containing some choice Zep highlights, this album, as with "Physical Graffiti" and "In Through The Out Door," has something for every rock fan, and that's no doubt one of the greatest appeals of Led Zeppelin. // 10

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overall: 9.3
Houses Of The Holy Reviewed by: beatles_rock09, on march 28, 2006
1 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sound: I love Led Zeppelin and their sound on this album is amazing. The album opens with "The Song Remains The Same," which was an instrumental until Robert Plant added the lyrics. The next and possibly greatest Zeppelin song is "The Rain Song." It is the most gorgeous song in the history of Zeppelin songs. I personally think that no song can compare with it, but many others beg to differ. There are other great songs on this album. For instance, there's "No Quarter," which is just weird. Plant's vocals sound like somethink you'd hear in a twisted nightmare, but it's still a really good song. "D'Yer Mak'er" is a Zeppelin version of reggae. They are able to pull it off, but I don't really care for the song itself. Led Zeppelin were able to write some of the best song for this album, and the sound is great. // 9

Lyrics: Some songs on this album, "The Rain Song" for example, didn't have lyrics until Plant put them. I would much rather hear these songs without Plant singing, but that doesn't make them any less great just because he sang. Don't get me wrong, Plant is a great vocalist and lyricist, but some his lyrics on this album are unnecessary. Now other songs, like "No Quarter," are made better because of his singing. I personally think that his lyrics make some of the songs better, but just that depends on who you are. Plant wrote some deep, thought provoking lyrics. The only problem is lyrics are great when they fit, but otherwise, are just there because Plant wanted them in. // 9

Overall Impression: Led Zeppelin is one of my favorite bands, and "Houses Of The Holy" is one of my favorite albums. The greatest song and possibly greatest Zeppelin song on this album is "The Rain Song." The only thing I have to complain about this album is Plant's lyrics. Don't get me wrong, I love Plant's voice, but sometimes on this album, the lyrics aren't necessary. Other than that, this album is a classic. The music alone is mindblowing. Jimmy Page and Robert Plant come together again to make "Houses Of The Holy" one of the greatest album of the classic rock era. // 10

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overall: 10
Houses Of The Holy Reviewed by: ungadain, on january 16, 2004
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: The sound of Houses of the Holy is, musically, totally complete. Although Led Zeppelin IV is the greatest album ever recorded, Houses of the Holy picked up on the one thing Zeppelin IV didn't have; keyboards. One of the finest characteristics of the band was John Paul Jones' magnificent keyboard work, and it is showcased particularly well in Dancing Days and No Quarter, the latter featuring an almost underwater sounding theme throughout, executed to perfection by Jones. He also contributes a wonderful harpsichord outro to Over the Hills and Far Away. Throughout the album there is no song that excessively accentuates one band member more than any other. Page, Bonham, Jones and Plant are all highlighted equally. // 10

Lyrics: As expected, Robert Plant did not disappoint at any moment throughout the album. He almost invented himself a new voice in The Crunge, which also includes a funny little conversation with himself looking for the bridge. He had not lost any of his lustre from Zeppelin IV, because he still has the knack for brilliant lyrics. // 10

Overall Impression: Houses of the Holy has everything that had been heard from the first 4 albums, and it portrays each genre the band covered quite well. There are the hard rockers (The Ocean, The Song Remains the Same), the bluesy ballads (D'Yer Mak'er, The Rain Song), and, of course, the resident epic expected from a Zeppelin album (No Quarter). The overall quality of the album is great; there is no song you want to skip past, just let it play through. D'Yer Mak'er is one of my favourite songs of all time; it is one of the catchiest tunes by any band. You can't help but sing Oh, oh oh oh oh oh, you don't have to go, oh oh oh oh all day long, whatever you may be doing. Houses of the Holy is comparable to Led Zeppelin IV in it's near perfection, but the difference is the more relaxed approach to Houses of the Holy. // 10

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overall: 8.7
Houses Of The Holy Reviewed by: guitar_freak523, on march 15, 2004
0 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sound: The sound and music is great it, it goes from anywhere from rock to folk to even regge. The guitar work is amazing as well as solid vocals, bass, and drums. Although if you were aroudn when this frist came out it might have been a major disappointment because this came out after there best album "IV". Which is why I'm rating it 4 because it's not like IV but it's a good over all look at the ZEP when they were at their prime. // 8

Lyrics: the lyrics are great just listen to song like "Over the hills and far away", "d'yer mak'er", "The ocean", "The Song remains the same" and you'll get the idea. Robert Plant and Jimmy Page were one of the best song writting team of the 70s and of the history of music. // 10

Overall Impression: Overall its a great album but if you're expecting something like "IV" you may be disappointed, but it's still an amazing album. My favorite songs on this album are "Over the hills and far away" "d'yer mak'er" and "the ocean". If it were lost or stolen I would buy it again. And is worth checking out. But again if you're expecting something like "IV" don't get it, have an open mind when listening to it because it's one of there best albums. // 8

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overall: 10
Houses Of The Holy Reviewed by: Faydock, on november 17, 2005
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: Released in early 1973 as the last of the Led Zeppelin albums that would be released and produced by Atlantic Records, this was a sure good album to end their contract with the company. The sound of this album is much more progressive than their others. It has a softter more mellow sound yet flows so well the the harder and louder sound. // 10

Lyrics: The songs on this album have amazing lyrics, Plant and the other members of the band did a great job song writing, yet, while even the lyrics are quite simple they still become quite catchy and I find myelf singing along with the music. They also did a good job setting the mood of the lyrics with the music and Plant's voice never ceases to amaze me. // 10

Overall Impression: This album has some really great songs, such as D'yer Mak'er, Dancing Days, Over The Hills And Far Away, and The Rain Song, I also like the guitar Jimmy Page has on Song Remains The Same, It's so incredible it's like an orchestra of music in his fingers. Overall all the songs on the album are great, the mood is just so much different than of what I'm used to from Zeppelin, and I just absolutely love it. // 10

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overall: 9.7
Houses Of The Holy Reviewed by: ZeppelinZed, on february 06, 2006
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: Being the fifth and last album realeased on Atlantic Records in 1973, Led Zeppelin's Houses Of The Holy is in my humble opinion an underrated work of art by the super group. While most all of their other albums can be categorized by a single dominant sound (Led Zeppelin I - blues, Led Zeppelin III - acoustic, etc), Houses Of The Holy reprsents the age of experimentation for Zeppelin. Your ear drums will be assaulted upon the first minute of listening with the hard rock opener The Song Remains the Same, followed by the soothing, "preety" Rain Song. Throughout the album you'll also encounter folk (Over The Hills And Far Away), a bit of funk (The Crunge), and a deeply meloncholy piece in the form of No Quarter, which also shines the spotlight on John Paul Jones' talent at keyboard. And then to wrap this nine song recording up is the extremely upbeat rocker, The Ocean, which if you listen closely begins with Bonzo counting out the pace. Implemnting Page's 12-string SG in TSRTS, utilizing Plant's peaceful but strong voice in Over the Hills, and handing it over to JPJ for his keyboard solo in No Quarter are just a small number of examples that prove House of the Holy's numerous strengths as not only a fantastic Zeppelin album, but a truly memorable record in rock history. // 10

Lyrics: Flowing through the album like Page flows through a live performance of Dazed and Confused, the lyrics completely match the tone and mood created in each and every song. As I stated earlier, this was the age of experimentation for Zeppelin, which meant that some alterations and tooling around with Plant's voice took place in several songs. But never fear! The distorted quality of the frontmans vocals actually enhance the experience for the fortunate listeners. And if it is truly captivating lyrics you desire, either No Quarter or The Rain Song are my personal favorites off the album. // 9

Overall Impression: If you are venturing off into the world of Zeppelin for the first time or you just need to get more of a Page fix, Houses would be an invaluable gem. The perfect mix of everything Zeppelin (heavy riffing, mysterious and goofy lyrics, soaring vocals), I cannot recommend this masterpiece enough! Just make sure to not be freaked out by the cover art. // 10

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overall: 9.3
Houses Of The Holy Reviewed by: DNC2112, on september 18, 2006
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: An overall great album without any "downers" if you're used to Zeppelin's style. To me, albums 1-4 (yes, I said it, the much-revered "ZoSo" album as well) build up to this album, and they all build up to Physical Graffiti. But anyway. I remember hearing that Jimmy Page agressively wrote this album in a creative fervor after the "theory" got thrown out there that he couldn't compete with archrival guitarist Pete Townshend of The Who, and write a rock opera. This was his barrage in response to that totally unfounded remark. "Tommy" relied on fast beats and a story about a deaf, dumb, and blind kid (who's really not) who's good at pinball. HOTH is about the music. 01. The Song Remains The Same - fantastic song. Fast, complex, overdubbed to the max, with Plant reaching into his higher range, Page really giving his equipment and his fingers one helluva workout, John Paul Jones adding color and texture with his excellent keyboard and bass skills, and John "Bonzo" Bonham pounding away with one of the catchiest, steadiest, quickest beats I've heard. Can't go wrong. 02. The Rain Song - a much slower, yet nonetheless complex song. Sort of a second part to TSRTS, Page uses a DGCGCD tuning for some very "pretty" droning guitar chords. It vies for the title of the album's "love ballad" against D'yer Mak'er. 03. Over The Hills And Far Away - an upbeat song centered around G with a hard-enough electric backing up the acoustic parts and a solo that isn't Page's best work but far from the worst you could possibly hear, it's still Jimmy Page. My absolue favorite song to play on acoustic, people seem to like to hear it even if they don't know what it is. 04. The Crunge - a very funk-oriented song done as sort of a tribute tune to James Brown. Bonham beats his skins with an energy unmatched in nearly any other band, but also eschews any other "normal" time signatures for an awkward 9:8 time! Very catchy, and a funky Zeppelin tuned rivaled only by Trampled Underfoot for it's funkiness. Where's that confounded bridge? 05. Dancing Days - Jimmy got the riff for this one from an old man playing it streetside in India. It's a strange- and worldly-enough tune that it fits perfectly with this album. A rocking, upbeat tune that you can't go wrong with. 06. D'yer Mak'er - it's not "Die-yer May-ker," just say it the way it looks. I've heard that saying it that way is one of two ways to piss off Robert Plant; the second is to call him Bobby. An excellent, very catchy ballad with a reggae beat. 07. No Quarter - personally, this is one of my favorite Zep songs. They prove with this one that you don't need tons of distortion, a triple-kick bass drum pedal, or detuned guitars to make a too-awesome heavy metal song, and this is as heavy as they get. It's in C#min, with keyboard and guitar solos burning slowly and darkly through the B Dorian scale. If you like it, look into the cover version by Tool. It's a very hit-or-miss song, but it's a hit for me. 08. The Ocean - "We've done four already but now we're steady and then they went: one, two, three, four" and BANG! come in the drums and the guitar. This song has possibly one of the most catchy riffs in history, even having the dubious honor of being sampled by the Beastie Boys on "She's Crafty." Plant again reaches into his higher ranges for this one, but the best part comes at the end with an abrupt time change that leads into the best outro solo any album has ever stopped with. This song is guaranteed to get your feet tapping. Jimmy Page put the sum of his skills as a producer into this album, and it shows. The mastering is, well, masterful, and each of the four band members really hits their mark in every song. You can't go wrong with this one. // 10

Lyrics: Usually, I'm more of a sucker for the actual music than the vocals of any given band. That being said, I don't pay much attention to the lyrics, and it wasn't until I looked at the inside of the cover booklet and realized how, skimpy, for lack of a better word, this album really is. If it's artistic lyric mastery you're looking for, go grab a Jethro Tull album and pass this one by, or if you think Ronnie James Dio's lyrics are the deepest words ever spoken, keep walking. Lyrically, this album really only "clicks" on a few songs. However, though some may be short on words, the subject matters of the songs and how the words are song sync perfectly with the music. It's hard not to listen and appreciate Plant's vocal skill. // 8

Overall Impression: I think the naked kids on the front were supposed to be sort of a suggestion to The Who and whoever started the rumor that Page couldn't write an epic rock opera like Pete Townshend could: kiss it. That's just my opinion, not actual fact, the trivia thrown in with the song reviews is fact. In fact, the entire album is an example of what en epic rock album should be. It ranges everywhere from driving-fast to deep and dark. If you're a Zep novice looking to buy your first album, this is a great place to start. The whole album is topped only by a few songs from other albums, such as Kashmir from Physical Graffiti and Achilles' Last Stand off Presence. Buy it if you haven't already. // 10

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overall: 10
Houses Of The Holy Reviewed by: Pittman, on may 24, 2007
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: I remember when I got my first Zeppelin cd, IV, and remember saying, man, this bands good. From there I bought I, II, III, but then I came across a CD called Houses of the Holy. My dad had always told me it was the best, but I had to hear it to beleive it. As soon as I put it in and heard Jimmy Page's 12 string in The Song Remains the Same blaring out chords, I was mezmerized. I was wandering, how could someone write riffs like that.I thought they were gods. From TSRTS to The Ocean, every song is amazing. People always think IV is the best because of Stairway, but I think it is hyped way too much and that this one is the best Zeppelin, and maybe the best CD I have ever heard in my life. The sound is great. Jimmy uses like 5 guitars every song, and you can tell. There is the sound of guitars everywhere. Everything else sounds good too. The bass and drums are crazy as always from John Paul Jones and Bonzo. The vocals are well different. They make Robert's voice really high pitched on some parts, but I think it supports the sound. // 10

Lyrics: The lyrics are pretty good, what is expected from Zeppelin. Roberts voice is really high on this CD though. It is good in some parts, but bad in others. what's really wierd is that this is the only Zeppelin that comes with the lyrics to every song. I guess it's because you can't understand his voice because of all the guitar tracks. Plus, they still have the infamous lyrics in the ocean where it says a bunch of random stuff in the book, but says something different in the song. Sumed up, the vocals are usual Zeppelin. It is probably the only problem I have, but that's not going to stop me from giving it a 10. // 10

Overall Impression: Compared to the rest of the Zeppelin, I think it is great. It has the sound of the past cds, but the technique of the latter ones.It really has it's shine in songs like No Quarter, Dyer Maker, and The Rain Song. If someone stole this CD from me, I would go buy a hundred copoies, so if it gets stolen again, I have 99 copies left. // 10

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overall: 9
Houses Of The Holy Reviewed by: Garf72, on september 27, 2007
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Sound: From the moment the opening track The Song Remains the Same thunders through right til the fantastic closing number The Ocean's doo-wop finish, this album persistantly pushes the boundaries defined by Led Zeppelin's previous albums and consistently pumps out the great songs that they were known to produce. This is perhaps their strangest album, not easily accessable to new fans of the band and also one that divides the most opinions, with some claiming it's too weird and others (rightly) saying it's a masterpiece. Released in 1973 and following the more famous Led Zeppelin IV would not be an easy task for most bands, but Led Zep strut through it with powerful songwriting and a unique diversity to the likes they had never attempted before. The sound on this album is tight and clean on the afore mentioned Song Remains the Same but also ranges through fuzzy and dark on the sublime No Quarter, raunchy on The Ocean and sweeping in The Rain Song. It varies from track to track as most of the songs on this album are of completely different styles, from the folk-rock explorations of Over the Hills and Far Away to the reggae tinged D'yer Mak'er. John Paul Jones is also brought to the forefront as he hadn't been before with his use of keyboarded instruments, such as the piano and keyboard in No Quarter and the mellotron in the Rain Song. His bass playing is also key to the funky, James Brown-esque The Crunge, which would be a throwaway track if it wasn't for his contribution. The late, great John Bonham is also worth mentioning, again in the Crunge but also The Ocean for which he sings at the start, "We've done four already but now we're steady, and then they went 1, 2, 3, 4!", which really adds to the atmosphere of the whole track. Jimmy Page, who needs no introducion sounds fantastic over the course of the whole album and also was responsible for the sound, as he had produced it himself, with help from Eddie Kramer, Jimi Hendrix's former producer. His guitar work is also astounding on just about all the tracks, because he either drives the whole song with his famous riffs or provides a fitting backing. Page's soloing abilities have never been stronger between Led Zeppelin IV and this album because it was when he found a great sound but also before he had begun to get sloppy. For proof, compare How the West Was Won to the Earls Court concerts. On Houses of the Holy he sounds best on the Song Remains the Same, No Quarter and The Ocean. // 10

Lyrics: The lyrics of Houses of the Holy are also diverse to go with the sound but also have hippy aspirations. Many of the tracks evoke hippy ideals such as unity, escapism and personal freedom. This is no clearer proven than in Dancing Days where Plant sings "I've got my flower, I've got my power". The end of the Crunge also shows his funny side when he has an odd but comical conversation with himself essentially, on whether he's "seen the bridge". The Rain Song is lyrically one of the strongest songs on the album and is also considered by Plant himself to be one of his greatest vocal performances for obvious reasons: he sounds fantastic, using his range to go from soft and quiet to passionate screaming. He also gives great swaggering performances in the Ocean and Dancing Days as well as a deeply melodic take in the impossibly catchy D'yer Mak'er. Another vocal worth mentioning is the soulful No Quarter which fits in perfectly for the track. Lyrically, it's dark and mysterious which fits in perfectly with the keyboard work that drives the song. The Ocean however, is driven by Plant's performance, from the first verse to the fantastic ending, he sounds as though he's sitting comfortably on cloud nine with a glass of cherry in his hand and a microphone in front of him, singing about the good times. // 8

Overall Impression: The only other albums I would compare this to for consistency are Dark Side of the Moon and Who's Next because it takes you on a ride through many genres and styles without lingering or going too far off course. This is done by straight ahead rocking opening and closing numbers to remind you who you're listening to. It is hard to pick a "best" song on the album because it's all done so well, but notable highlights are the ones that became concert staples. This includes the Song Remains the Same, the Rain Song (which were more often than not played one after the other because of the great link), Over the Hills and Far Away, No Quarter and The Ocean. This is probably the most underrated album in the Led Zeppelin catalogue because of it's awkward position, in between Led Zeppelin IV and the double album Physical Graffiti, which are both frequently lauded as their best works. It is also more difficult to access becuase of it's diverse sound. It takes a few persistant listens before the album grows on you, as it did for me. I now say it's my favourite Led Zeppelin album and also one of my favourite albums of all time. In that sense it's achieved cult status, because the few who love it, really do whereas others keep to themore famous songs on it. If it was stolen, I'd be slightly pissed off but I have two copies, by sheer chance but would probably buy it again just in case. I suggest to anyone reading this: buy it, steal it, find it or download it and enjoy. // 9

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overall: 8.7
Houses Of The Holy Reviewed by: black-sabbath, on june 11, 2008
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Sound: Houses of the Holy has a huge sound variety. Tracks like Over the Hills Far Away and The Rain Song are acoustic, and as we know, Led Zeppelin is really good acoustically. Other songs, like The Song Remains The Same, Dancing Days and The Ocean are more fast paced and not acoustic. And then there's the haunting synthesized instrumental part of No Quarter, which is my favourite song on this album! // 9

Lyrics: Most Zeppelin songs tell a story, same with this album. The songs tell an event with a unique style of poetry. Robert Plant has so much emotion in his voice and uses his different tones a lot. The mood of the lyrics and music are perfect, and fit together well. // 8

Overall Impression: This is my second favourite Zeppelin album, my favourite being Led Zeppelin IV. This is most of my friend's favourite Led Zeppelin album and I can easily see why. It's a really good album with a bunch of different styles, each one showing you how well the band can play. I would definately go buy this again if it went missing, as soon as I could. No Zeppelin fan should be without this album! // 9

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overall: 8.7
Houses Of The Holy Reviewed by: Godbe, on august 25, 2008
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Sound: In terms of Led Zeppelin, this is the band at its most diverse musically. This is often cited as Led Zeppelin's worst album, simply because of their experimentation on this record, however in my opinion, the band prove their fine musicianship by doing these different styles so well. Songs such as 'The Crunge' and 'D'Yer Mak'er' prove that Led Zeppelin can tackle a diverse range of styles while still sounding like a band that knows what they are doing. However, that is also my greatest criticism of this album (which albeit is rather small), in that these experimental songs are, although good, a bit lacklustre in terms of what's expected of Led Zeppelin. That being said, the album still boasts many great songs such as 'The Song Remains The Same', 'The Rain Song', 'Over The Hills And Far Away', 'No Quarter' and 'The Ocean' (Admittedly I have just named all but 3 tracks from the album, which goes to show that the album ranges from songs that are good to those that are excellent). // 8

Lyrics: Robert Plant is fantastic on this album, his beautiful voice working perfectly with the rest of the band in tracks such as 'The Rain Song'. The album doesn't show off his voice as much as other albums, but Robert Plant still does a fantastic job at showing the range of his voice, from the energy of the opening track 'The Song Remains The Same', to the hushed beauty of the penultimate track 'No Quarter'. The lyrics also are of a high standard, though lacking a little on songs such as 'The Crunge' and 'D'Yer Mak'er', these drops in quality are more than made up for by other tracks, most notably 'The Rain Song', which, in my opinion, is far more note-worthy than cliched tracks such as 'Stairway To Heaven' (from Led Zeppelin IV) in terms of lyrics. // 9

Overall Impression: In terms of Led Zeppelin, this is definitely their most diverse album, so for casual listeners, it will be hard to get in to. But for the die-hard fans, there are so many overlooked gems on this album that will keep you awestruck for hours. Personaly, I'd say this is my second favourite Led Zeppelin album, second only to Physical Graffiti. Like I've said previously, the overall quality of each track ranges from good to excellent, and is definitely worth a listen by anyone. // 9

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