Led Zeppelin II Review

artist: led zeppelin date: 04/19/2011 category: compact discs
led zeppelin: Led Zeppelin II
Released: Oct 22, 1969
Genre: Rock
Tones: Volatile, Sexual, Aggressive, Reckless, Confident, Brash, Fiery, Menacing, Irreverent
Styles: Blues-Rock, Hard Rock, Heavy Metal, Arena Rock, British Metal
Number Of Tracks: 9
 Sound: 9.2
 Lyrics: 8.4
 Overall Impression: 9.4
 Overall rating:
 9.2 
 Reviewer rating:
 9 
 Users rating:
 9.3 
 Votes:
 112 
reviews (17) 34 comments vote for this album:
overall: 8.7
Led Zeppelin II Reviewed by: mark276, on september 06, 2003
3 of 3 people found this review helpful

Sound: The sound quality is good on Led Zeppelin II, except for a few moments during the solo break in Heartbreaker where the tone sounds off a bit. // 8

Lyrics: Robert Plant was still growing as a lyricist at this time and it shows occasionally. He did have his great moments (Ramble On) and overall he did a good job. // 8

Overall Impression: Shortly after the success of their self titled debut, Led Zeppelin returned to the studio during their first U.S. tour to record their sophmore effort, Led Zeppelin II. Led Zeppelin II is both a musical growth over Led Zeppelin I and a back to basics heavy blues rock album that would prove to be the blueprint for almost every hard rock band since. Gone is much of the psychedelia that marked the first album, replaced with more heavy guitar riffs and signature Jimmy Page solos. But what is really striking are the two acoustic numbers, "Ramble On" and "Thank You", which both serve as a precursor of things to come in Led Zeppelin III. The album opens with "Whole Lotta Love", a thinly veiled rewrite of Willie Dixon's classic "You Need Lovin'", only this version is armed with a new guitar riff and an extended instrumental section. This would become one of Led Zeppelin's signature songs, and proved to be their highest charting single, peaking at #4 on the Billboard charts. The next track is a complete change of pace, entitled "What Is And What Should Never Be". While still a good song, it is obvious that at this time Robert Plant was still somewhat finding himself as a songwriter. Next is "The Lemon Song", a reworked version of a old Robert Johnson standard. Following that is "Thank You", a lighter number with Jimmy Page's acoustic guitar and John Paul Jones' organ prominant. The next two are some of the band's rocking best, "Heartbreaker" and "Living Loving Maid". "Heartbreaker" sports one of Jimmy Page's most famous riffs and an instantly recognizable guitar solo. It flows directly into "Living Loving Maid", a basic rocker with a catchy chorus. Following that is one of the band's absolute best acoustic numbers, "Ramble On". The guitar work in "Ramble On" is rivaled only by Robert Plant's excellent Lord of the Rings themed lyrics. Jones' bass is also a central figure of the song, providing a subtle mood. A jam track is next on the album, "Moby Dick". Its a very good jam but the drum solo seems to stretch on far too long. At times you are uncertain whether to skip foward because you aren't a drummer, or marvel at John Bonham's undeniable skill. The closer is "Bring It On Home", another reworked Willie Dixon classic. This song features some of Plant's best harmonica playing and some of his bluesiest vocals. After a classic blues verse it explodes into a hard rocking chorus and then goes back to the verse again. Its a fitting end to the album and it epitimizes Led Zeppelin II's brutal, rocking assult on the blues. Through this album Led Zeppelin is telling you that they are a new force to be reckoned with, bold and brash, and with unrivaled musical talent. Although many band's have tried to recreate the energy, the force, and the freshness of II, none have succeded. // 10

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overall: 3.3
Led Zeppelin II Reviewed by: GuitaPlaya, on february 14, 2005
2 of 28 people found this review helpful

Sound: This is a very overated album. The music itself is pretty good on a few songs. Whole lotta love, Heart Breaker, Moby Dick and What Is And What Should Never Be are the best songs sound wise. The problem is that they are not good the whole way through. Whole Lotta Love has an annoying percusion solo that lasts way too long. Heart Breaker has a guitar solo that does not flow well with the rest of the song (everything stops and Jimmy Page does some random stuff while nobody else is playing). And Moby Dick has a drum solo. All it is is the drummer playing stuff while no other instrument plays. What Is And What Should Never Be is the only solid song. // 4

Lyrics: Horrible. There's absolutly no meaning to these. Not only are they mindless but some are just gross. Like the Lemon Song which he says "Squeeze my lemons till the juice comes down my leg." Who wants listen to some who sings about that. And Moby Dick doesn't even have lyrics. Which makes it very repeditive. // 2

Overall Impression: Just don't get this album. It's very overated. The reason this got a 2 instead of a one is because it's got some catchy riffs and one decent song. If you do want a Led Zeppelin CD get the greatest hits. But if you want real classic rock buy a Jimmy Hendrix, The Who or Pink Floyd. Save a few bucks and skip this one. // 4

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overall: 9.7
Led Zeppelin II Reviewed by: Skirvy, on july 29, 2008
2 of 2 people found this review helpful

Sound: Led Zeppelin II, was the first Led Zeppelin Album I ever heard. I can still remember the rush that it gave me. From The opening riff of Whole Lotta Love to the bluesy outro to Bring It On Home the album astounded me and still does. The album was experimental with drums solos and breaks unlike anyone had ever heard, in songs such Whole Lotta Love and Moby Dick, the latter being John Bonham's finest hour. The album features both sides of Jimmy Pages songwriting techniques with the acoustic brilliance of Thank You and the start of Ramble On. The album itself is very bluesy as Page was heavily influenced by the genre. It was produced by Page himself who was very innotive in the Recording Industry using techniques which had never been seen before. // 10

Lyrics: The lyrics in Led Zeppelin II show Plants love and feeling for woman e.g. Whole Lotta Love, Heartbreaker, Living Loving Maid (Shes Just A Woman). He also wrote lyrics relating to fantasy book Lord Of the Rings which was popular at the time. This can be heard in Ramble On and on later albums in songs such as The Battle Of Evermore off IV. Plant's lyrics were not as innovative as Page's instrumental work but they worked well together, and Plants vocals suited the music perfectly. // 9

Overall Impression: When the question What is Led Zep's best album? arises the usual answer tends to be IV or Physical Graffiti, but Led Zeppelin II was a very important album in Led Zeppelin's 11 year career and it was only released in there first year, several months after the First Album. On the album the most impressive songs tend to be the un-sung heroes, such as Ramble On which had never been played live until Zep's 2007 Reunion concert! The album can't really be split into individual best songs, so listen to it together as one piece the way Zeppelin intended! Oh and by the way, I would definetly buy it again if I lost it, even if all the tracks are already on my itunes! // 10

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overall: 9.3
Led Zeppelin II Reviewed by: Da Jerk, on july 25, 2005
1 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sound: Led Zeppelin's second album is exponentially better than their already amazing debut. The sound quality has also definitely improved this time around. Though some would say it is too heavy on the bass, I like it because it's easier to hear the creative basslines of John Paul Jones, one of my favorite bassists of all time. His biggest chances to shine on the album are on the almost lounge-styled ballad "What Is And What Should Never Be," the funky blues number "The Lemon Song" in which he has a bass solo, and the radio hit "Ramble On" in which guitarist Jimmy Page almost seems to hide behind Jonesy's innovative playing. The band also starts to become more diverse on this album, whereas their debut was mainly blues-based with a few folkish numbers. The aforementioned "What Is And What Should Never Be" and "Ramble On" both have mystical-styled lyrics, the latter containing well-known references to Lord Of The Rings. The popular ballad "Thank You" is also found here, with some beautiful organ and guitar playing from Jones and Page. "Bring It On Home" starts out as a laid-back blues number and features singer Robert Plant on harmonica, but soon goes into an energetic hard rock section with one of the band's greatest riffs. "Living Loving Maid (She's Just A Woman)," which is popular on classic rock stations, is a short, humorous number about a persistent groupie Zeppelin encountered. There is also another instrumental track, "Moby Dick," which contains a drum solo by John Bonham. While the majority of his live solos were more impressive, most fans prefer the short, 4 minute original version. The most blues-based songs on the album are the aforementioned "The Lemon Song" and "Bring It On Home," as well as what are probably the two most popular tracks, "Whole Lotta Love" and "Heartbreaker." The former has one of the most well-known riffs in rock history, as well as a trippy middle section including strange theremin tricks, courtesy of Jimmy Page. "Heartbreaker" has a better riff in my opinion, and is a better song, also in my opinion. About 2 minutes into the track, the band stops and Jimmy Page plays an insanely fast guitar solo, which was amazing at the time. This album is a big improvement over the debut, which showed that the boys could reach out to other styles and at the same time create their own unique, yet approachable sound. // 10

Lyrics: The lyrics here are an improvement over the debut, but Robert Plant's skills as a lyricist still haven't reached their peak. Songs like "Living Loving Maid" and "The Lemon Song" show that the band has a sense of humor, and "What Is And What Should Never Be" and "Ramble On" prove that Plant was already interested in mysticism. "Thank You" has some of Plant's cheesiest lyrics; however, they were originally written for his wife, so at least they're sincere I hope. While the lyrics on Led Zeppelin II still aren't amazing, they're an improvement over the first album. // 8

Overall Impression: Led Zeppelin II is one of my favorite albums by the band. While some fans are probably tired of hearing "Whole Lotta Love" and "Ramble On" on the radio, I still enjoy hearing each song. This is one of the albums that resulted in the creation of hard rock as we know it. If my copy of Led Zeppelin II was lost or stolen, I'd definitely buy it again. // 10

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overall: 10
Led Zeppelin II Reviewed by: thewiserafiki, on september 25, 2005
1 of 2 people found this review helpful

Sound: Well this in my opinion is one of their most bluesy albums, which is not a bad thing. If your a blues-rock fan, definitely get this album. // 10

Lyrics: To tell you the truth, as a guitarist I really don't give a crap about lyrics, but I mean roberts a great singer and thats all I'm gonna say much about that. // 10

Overall Impression: This album is my second favorite Zeppelin album, only behind Zoso. It opens with the classic hard rock anthem, Whole Lotta Love, a simple but great song, with one of my favorite guitar solos. Then comes What is and What never should be, which has a verse with a weird vocal effect which is kind of annoying, but comes back with a great chorus and slide solo. The Lemon Song is a great bluesy song where Jimmy Page holds the spotlight. Great song all-around. Then comes Thank You, a good song but not my favorite. Followed by Heartbreaker, a fun song with an amazing solo. Then comes Living Lovin maid, another great blues-hardrock song. Then comes yet another Zeppelin anthem, Ramble on. A song thats starts acoustic and works its way into good ol' hard rock. Then comes the instrumental, Moby Dick. Great song if you play an instrument. If you don't, well then youll probably skip this song everytime it comes on. Finally comes the bluesiest song on the album, but comes back with a hard rock chorus ala. What is and what never should be and ramble on. If you dont play guitar, you might wanna look into it. But if you do play guitar, this is a definite musthave. // 10

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overall: 10
Led Zeppelin II Reviewed by: Faydock, on november 19, 2005
1 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sound: Often hailed as the 'best' Led Zeppelin albums along with the untitled, this is definitely one of Led Zeppelin's albums that deserves to be rated as the greatest. Stepping back from the earlier blue tunes, the band now starts playing some more louder and faster songs with some awesome riffs and solos, heard in songs such as Heartbreaker, Ramble On, and What Is And What Should Never Be. I usually find myself getting surprised from unexpected parts in songs that seem to pop out, such as the heavy guitar riffs and hard rocking sound at the end of What Is And What Should Never Be, and the insane solos of Heartbreaker, this is just a taste of the other incredible songs on this album. // 10

Lyrics: Though not the best lyrics of their albums, Plant was still trying to get the songwriting down and in my opinion I think he did a very good job with Ramble On and others, his voice now starting to develop it's high pitched girly singing voice starts to show on these songs while still sounding great. // 10

Overall Impression: This album is often called "overrated," but let me give you my word, this is one of those albums that is highly rated for a reason: it's amazing. I often hear people saying this is their favorite album and I like to say it is also one of my favorites, I recommend this album to any Led Zeppelin fan who doesn't already have it. // 10

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overall: 10
Led Zeppelin II Reviewed by: unregistered, on february 13, 2006
1 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sound: This definitely one of Led Zeppelin's greatest albums. It remarkable that the album was made in such a short time to be that excellent. Their sound in this is simply phenominal with hits such as Whole Lotta Love (which is my most favourite Led Zeppelin song ever second to Stairway To Heaven), Heartbreaker featuring a unique guitar solo, Ramble On blending hard rock with folk, Lemon Song, bring it on home and also Moby Dick. The album is undoubtly flawless through and through. // 10

Lyrics: There's no denying to Robert Plant's appealing and sexually charged lyrics with such example as Whole Lotta Love. Overall the lyrics are excellent and matches perfectly with the songs. Robert is absolutely an excellent frontman. // 10

Overall Impression: It really is one of Led Zeppelin's best albums ever. It's a Zeppelin album isn't it they're all hits right? I suggest anyone if you dont have this album to buy it. It's a must for every rock and roll and Led Zeppelin fan. This album shows that Led Zeppelin is the one of the greatest band ever (to me they are the greatest ever). Jimmy Page influenced me to be better as a guitarist and so the rating is easy. // 10

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overall: 9
Led Zeppelin II Reviewed by: The_Raven, on october 19, 2007
1 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sound: Well this is Led Zeppelin, so we can naturally expect an exceptionally brilliant sound thanks to John Bonham's fantastic drumming, John Paul Jones' superb bass and incredible keyboard perfomance, Robert Plant's instantly recognizable voice and, of course, Jimmy Page's excellent array of riffs, solos and plain skill at the guitar. Led Zeppelin II is my favourite Zeppelin CD because the guitar on the ablum is very rock, shown in songs like Livin' Lovin' Maid, the solo on Whole Lotta Love, (obviously) Heartbreaker, Moby Dick and the Lemon Song. I much prefer this tone to tones shown on songs like Ramble On (though that is an excellent song). // 10

Lyrics: Well, this is Led Zeppelin, so naturally the majority of the lyrics are quite good and some even philosphical, but of course there exceptions presented in the form of "fun" songs with great guitar, fantastic vocals but lyrics lacking depth (not that I am complaining). The lyrics match the music extremley well, a skill I have often noticed in Led Zeppelin. Robert Plant. Just the name brings to mind the powerful and recognizable vocals, which are some of the best in the world of rock and roll. Need I say more? // 8

Overall Impression: Compared to Zeppelin I, this is by far the better album. Most definitley, I would put it at least on par with Led Zeppelin IV. Overall, I was very impressed by the songs on the album and the music itself. I fully reccomend the album to any Led Zeppelin fan, or someone wanting a taste of the classic rock band that is Led Zeppelin. // 9

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overall: 8.7
Led Zeppelin II Reviewed by: BassManDan101, on april 28, 2008
1 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sound: This album is where the band really started to rock and hard! The songs are all awesome, and there aren't any weak tracks on the whole album! With Robert Plant's siren of a voice, Jimmy Page's imaginative, ingenious guitar work, John Paul Jones melodic, intricate basslines and Bonzo's powerful, pounding drums, this album is a rock n' roll classic! // 10

Lyrics: The lyrics are mainly written by Plant, and are great, but still haven't reached the level of maturity in such albums as Led Zeppelin IV and onwards. Mostly talking about women and sex (Whole Lotta Love, The Lemon Song, Heartbreaker, Living Loving Maid, Bring it On Home), the lyrical high point of the Album (in my opinion) is the beautiful Ramble On, Inspired by the work of J.R.R Tolkien, of which remains the theme for other Zeppelin songs! // 7

Overall Impression: 01. Whole Lotta Love - the awesome, and possibly one of the most famous riffs in rock. Starting off with Page, Plant and Jones, Bonham soon kicks in with the chorus and the song is off! The rather long bridge adds to the song and atmosphere, containing various moans and groans from Plant, and unusual effects and guitar wizardry from Page, but after a Powerful fill from Bonham, Page Kicks into a blistering solo! A true rock classic! 02. What Is And Should Never Be - starting with Plant's heartfelt wors, some bass noodling and gentle chords in the background, soon the song turns to a rockin' chorus. Repeated throughout the song, but still a great listen! 03. The Lemon Song - another awesome rock song! Page comes in with a cool bluesy riff, and soon in come the rest. Filled with innuendo, serious riffing, a bitching bass solo, and ofcourse, the famous line, "Squeeze my lemon baby, til the juice runs down my leg." 04. Thankyou - beautiful. All I have to say about this song. Led Zeppelin really prove their ability to write slow songs as well as rock ones with this one. 05. Heartbreaker - a true rockin' song. The famous riff, the weird and wonderful solo, Plant's lovelorn lyrics, and Bonham and Jones's rockin' rhythm. A Zeppelin classic. 06. Living Loving Maid - a cool, simple riff with a great rhthym. Despite it being Page's least favourite tracka and short length, I think it's a great track. Also, some great bass work in the chorus. One of their simpler songs, but still good. 07. Ramble On - an awesome song, and my personal favourite. Starts with some nice acoustic chords, a melodic bassline and Plant quietly singing heartfelt lyrics (inspired by the Hobbit), soon bursts into a great chorus. Definately the lyrical highpoint of the song, and showcasing the bands talents. 08. Moby Dick - starts with the great riff, broken up with some rockin' solo breaks from Page. But after a couple of bars, it all turns into a drum solo. Not really my kind of thing, but still, you can't help marvel at Bonhams awesome skills. 09. Bring It On Home - another great song. My second favourite on the album, and my favourite riff. Starts with some bluesy twelve bar blues at the beginning, accompanied by a harmonica. Plant swaps his usual high pitched wail for a bluesy drone. Just as the song becomes a little boring, it all goes quiet, when Page comes in with an unbelievable riff. Before you know it, it becomes the Zeppelin we all know and love. A great finisher for this awesome record. This is Led Zeppelin's true rock album. A must buy for all Zeppelin fans, and probably the best buy for people wanting to get into them! // 9

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overall: 10
Led Zeppelin II Reviewed by: unregistered, on january 19, 2004
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: Recorded in the studio during there first u.s.tours. Zeppelin 2 provided a blueprint that most all rock acts followed. The overall sound of the album is heavy and hard, brutal and direct. Due to the lack of studio time, most that became known as zeppelin 2 was reworked blues and rock standards that the band played live at the time. Even with the lack of studio time that resulted in lack of orginal material, it created a sound more direct "whole lotta love", The Lemon song", and "bring it on home" are based upon classic blues numbers-only the riffs are louder and each has sections for extended solos. The album produced two heavenly beautiful acoustic gems "ramble on" and "thank you". Zeppelin 2 did lack the eclectism of zeppelin 1, but it's arguably a more influential and commerical record. Nearly all the ever growin' list of imitators zeppelin have spawned they all draw back to this album, but lack in countless dynamics and its pummeling riffs. // 10

Lyrics: The lyrics all came together here crafting something very unique and special. Robert Plant using his trademark banshee wails to almost whispering moans. Crafted the perfect way to sing this lyrics to craftin' wonderful little gems here and there. // 10

Overall Impression: This is definitely among Zeppelin's best albums and among rock's greatest albums. I find it a highly impressive album with sheerly golden gems like: "Whole lotta love", "What is and what should never be", "thank you", "heartbreaker", "living lovin' maid (she's just a woman)", and "ramble on" all stand in my mind as the songs that made this album what is and what it always will be. Truthfully what is there to dislike about this album. If I lost it or it got stolen, I'd most definitely buy it, again. This album is very much worth buying, burn something else, buy this album you'd much appreiate buying this album. // 10

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overall: 10
Led Zeppelin II Reviewed by: ooohyeah, on july 26, 2004
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: The sound of this album is brilliant all the way through. Superb riffs like in Whole Lotta Love, Heartbreaker and Bring It On Home along with excellent solos and even acoustic songs like Ramble On. Led Zeppelin have some of the best musicians in rock as shown by John Bonham's long drum solo in Moby Dick and Jimmy Page's flawless guitar work over the whole album. The sound ranges across different musical styles, including blues type songs like What Is And What Should Never Be. // 10

Lyrics: Lyrics themselves don't stand out as much as other Led Zeppelin albums but they go well with the music and Robert Plant is an excellent vocalist and fits in with all styles of music shown on the album. // 10

Overall Impression: I love this album. My favourite songs on it are Whole Lotta Love, Bring It On Home, Heartberaker and all the others really. This is definitely one of the best Led Zeppelin albums, probably the best. If lost or stolen I would buy another immediately and then listen to it. Twice. // 10

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overall: 9.3
Led Zeppelin II Reviewed by: unregistered, on may 16, 2005
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: This is apart of Zeppelin's top 3 albums. It's probabaly their second best and arguably their best, but it's defianitly in the top 3. It's a masterpiece, what else can I say? This is when they were in there prime. Plant was singing away, Bonham was banging on those drums (and doing 5 minute drum solos ), JPJ was playing killer bass lines, and as usual the mighty Jimmy Page was playing away on his axe. This remains one of my favorite Zeppelin albums. Everything is just soo good. // 10

Lyrics: Good lyrics overall. Not the deepest Zeppelin lyrics but it has good love songs like, The Lemon Song, Thank You, Heartbreaker, and Livin' Lovin' Maid. And on Ramble On it has to do with lotr and golum which is kinda funny. // 8

Overall Impression: Great album. The best you could want from Zeppelin. They really get the led out on this one. The best songs are Whole Lotta Love, The Lemon Song, Heartbreaker, Moby Dick and Bring It On Home. A masterpiece! If someone stole this I would beat them over the head with my fist. If I lost it I would go buy 100 copies. 1 for me and the rest for my friends. // 10

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overall: 9.3
Led Zeppelin II Reviewed by: Flashback4, on october 03, 2005
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: Now Led Zeppelin. Well what sort of band do you think they are? Rock? Folk? Blues? Well yes bascically there all of that. Well in this album it will cover heavy rock songs, with a bit of blues in it. Some of the songs are folk rock. I don't know any other band that are like Led Zeppelin, well apart from there tribute bands. They have there own unique sound that is very attractive and good. // 9

Lyrics: Robert Plant (lead singer) always comes up with great lyrics. I can't stop singing to them. His words are very intelligent because of the way he puts them in the song. If that makes sense. And he uses the right tones and pitches at the right time. // 9

Overall Impression: Out of Led Zep, Led Zep II and Led Zep III I have to say this is my favourite one. The best songs are The Lemon Song, Heartbreaker, Whole Lotta Love and Moby Dick. I have actually seen the tribute band and they were just like them. What I love about this album is that is quite varied in terms of the song. It will start with a heavy song - Whole Lotta Love then go to a slow song then a heavy song then a slow song then a heavy song. So you might just like the slow ones, or you might like the heavy ones. Or you might like both. Either way you'll be astonished by the songs. If it were stolen I would defineatly by another one with out a doubt. // 10

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overall: 8.3
Led Zeppelin II Reviewed by: unregistered, on march 02, 2006
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Sound: Before I get into this review, I'd like to make a correction to the last one I did, which was a review of Led Zeppelin I. I said that Jimmy used a Les Paul and a Vox amp for his sound, but that isn't true. Jimmy used a 1959 Les Paul, a 10-string Fender Steel Pedal, and a Supro amp. So the world was blown away with the arrival of Led Zeppelin debut album, and Led Zeppelin II was no different. In fact this album again proved that Led Zeppelin was above all other bands at the time. Sure Floyd was expanding their horizons, and investigating new sounds, and AC DC was taking those same old blues riffs, and making them sound fresh, but who wouldn't want to listen to 'Whole Lotta Love' which kicks off the second epic. The band takes a more independent approach to their sound on this album, which isn't as blues-heavy as the first album. John Paul Jones again takes the keyboards, and uses rolling chords and keyboard riffs to spice up 'Thank You' which is not something you would expect after listening to Led Zeppelin I. The jewel of the album is not 'Whole Lotta Love', but the rockin' blues song 'The Lemon Song' which again takes advantage of a Howlin' Wolf song (Killin' Floor). The great thing about the song is where the band pauses, and changes tempo so Jimmy can rip out a roarin' boogie-woogie/rock guitar solo. Bonzo's drumming is also a point of admiration, as his power and drum fills become more complicated and different from other drummers at that time. also listen to 'Moby Dick' and feel the emotion that Bonzo is pouring through his hands. The drum solo is great. The album also takes use of Robert Plant's amazing harmonica playing abilities. 'Bring It On Home' is a blues induced song that lulls you into a sense of... just something that is inexplainable. And the out of nowhere, Jimmy busts down the very walls of rock and roll with his rectified guitar riff that stuns anyone who is listening, and that sent goosebumps up my back when I heard it. This is definitely an extremely dynamic album, but again not one of the best. // 8

Lyrics: Robert was still ripping off of bluesman at the time of the second album, which caused Led Zeppelin to be sued by Willie Dixon in 1987, by citing similarities between his 'You Need Love', and 'Whole Lotta Love'. Robert vocals on this album are much more dynamic than on Led Zeppelin I, and he takes (in my opinion) a much more emotional approach to his singing. Two examples of this are 'Thank You', and 'What Is And What Should Never Be'. Also 'Ramble On' was a great vocal point of the album. The rest of the album is really blues heavy, and is typical of Led Zeppelin. Pretty good vocals. // 9

Overall Impression: Great album. Absolutely phenomenal. All the songs on the album are distinct, and clearly a Led Zeppelin song. The greatest song on this album is without a doubt 'The Lemon Song' because it combines so many blues and rock elements, as well as timing experiments. Thats all Led Zeppelin albums are. Just experiments with music and sound. The thing that gets me is again Jimmy's sloppy guitar playing, coupled by my admiration for his talent of salvaging. His guitar playing is the thorn in my side on almost every album, except maybe Presence. The Zeppelin discography is not complete without this album as I said for Led Zeppelin I. If I lost it, I wouldn't go but it (twenty dollars at the cheapest) but would definitely burn it. I don't think I could last long without hearing Robert sing, "Shake for me girl/I wanna be your backdoor man." Amazing album. // 8

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overall: 9.3
Led Zeppelin II Reviewed by: Modernmusich8er, on april 25, 2006
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Sound: This is definately one of Zeppelin's best albums. The sound of this album is great, as well as any other of Zeppelin's albums. The album is quite relentless for the time it was made (1969), opening with Whole Lotta Love and closing with Bring It On Home. I will rate each song individually now. 01. Whole Lotta Love - this is a great song, but the drums with feedback carrys on for a bit too long. 02. What Is And What Should Never Be - this song goes from mellow to heavy in a matter of seconds a few times. The slide guitar solo is also great. 03. The Lemon Song - this song is a fantastic song with distortion aplenty. Jimmy Page truly shows his skills in this song with some great guitar work. 04. Thank You - a nice acoustic piece (maybe a sign of things to come in Led Zeppelin 3). Nothing much more to say about it than that. 05. Heartbreaker - this is one of my favorite tracks off the album. Great rhythm section with a great guitar solo. This is Led Zeppelin in it's prime right here. 06. Living Loving Maid (She's Just A Woman) - a radio staple off the album, but still stands as a great song with a very catchy beat and a simple but nice guitar solo. 07. Ramble On - Led Zeppelin shows a great side of themselves with transforming from progressive acoustic to heavy in a matter of seconds, a really great song. 08. Moby Dick - this is what showcased John Bonham as the phenomenal drummer he really is. A really nice job by Jimmy Page on the guitar at the beginning, but John Bonham really stands out as a legendary drummer and is one of rock's best drummers of all time. It's a shame he went so soon. 09. Bring It On Home - this is one of the best album closing songs of all time, it's also my personal favorite off the CD. What seems to be a mellow ending kicks into overdrive with unbeliveably strong vocals and genious guitar riffs, what a song! // 10

Lyrics: The lyrics in this album are typical rock n roll lyrics, women and drugs. I can easily look over this and listen to the great music, because Led Zeppelin is that good. If you are the type of person that judges their albums on lyrics greatly, this album is probably not for you. On the other hand, if you can overlook cheesy lyrics and appreciate the phenomenal music than you will love this album. // 8

Overall Impression: This album is one of Led Zeppelin's best, and I highly recommend it. The guitar, bass, drums, vocals, and even some harmonica, are top-notch. The overall impression and message of this album is telling you to rock out like there's no tommorow, a good message. I have 3 copies of this album, so it would be cool if it were lost or stolen because a stranger would hear Led Zeppelin at their arguably best. // 10

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overall: 9
Led Zeppelin II Reviewed by: SethMegadefan, on july 11, 2006
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Sound: Being consistent innovators of the rock genre, 1969's "Led Zeppelin II", the band's sophomore LP, hit hard. With raging blues-induced spitfires mixed with softer and quieter comfortable numbers, the album no doubt became a stepping stone for later 1970's hard rock acts. Heavily blues-driven songs like "Whole Lotta Love", "The Lemon Song", "Heartbreaker", "Living Loving Maid", and "Bring it On Home" give an even older-school feel than was present on the album's predecessor, Led Zeppelin I. Still, as much as that rocks, a few slower and more pleasant numbers are thrown into the mix, such as the alternating soft-hard "What is and What Should Never Be", the easy-going ballad "Thank You", and one of Zeppelin's best tunes, "Ramble On", which contains the famous Lord of the Rings references to Gollum and Mordor. Though the album sure has a lot of thematic variety, it doesn't skimp on the instrumental end of things. It's clear song after song that each member is present. Page shines through with his mesmerizing guitar work on "Whole Lotta Love" and "Heartbreaker" (arguably two of his coolest solos), with incredible rhythm work to go along. Plant has the amazing ability to muster up fascinating blues-style vocals on "The Lemon Song" or "Bring it on Home", but he also has some wonderful softer vocals, that are very evident on the magnificent "Thank You". Jones, the astounding multi-instrumentalist, takes bass guitar on all the tracks here, and even throws in the classic keyboard too. The bass line for "Heartbreaker" is arguably the most pounding bass line in all of rock music, while his keyboard work on "Thank You" shows the man's sheer musical genius. And, how could I forget John Bonham? He gets a full 4 minute drum solo on the album's penultimate number, "Moby Dick"; although the album version barely surpasses satisfactory, some of his live performances of the song are simply mesmerizing. He also gets a sweet drum interlude in the mystic middle section of "Whole Lotta Love". So, it's apparent that every member contributed immensely to this album. Led Zeppelin does its best at utilizing every aspect of their sound, and Led Zeppelin II is a pretty good example of that. // 9

Lyrics: Lyrically, the album's a genuine mix. With the blues songs come bluesier, albeit less thought-out, lyrics. Although this works out quite well! Certain blues-like lines like "Squeeze my lemon 'til the juice runs down my leg" or "I'm gonna give ya every inch of my love", for example, turn out to be some of the most memorable lines of the album. Not to mention they contribute well to the album's massively blues atmosphere. On the contrary, though, other songs take a drastic turn. "Thank You" is a ballad about loving a woman forever and ever, and has some of the most touching lyrics on the album. "Ramble On" contains passages that tell the tale of autumn approaching, and how Plant would like to stay but he simply must continue to, as the title suggests, ramble on. It just seems like Zeppelin have the ability to make the lyrical content match the mood of the songs so perfectly. I don't know, maybe I'm just a hopeless fanboy. // 8

Overall Impression: Overall, though I wouldn't put the album in my top 5 favorites, it still stand high among most other Zep albums (and rock albums in general, for that matter). It's definitely the bands most "rocking" release, and is probably the reason why so many metal fans consider it to be the band's best. Though I personally disagree with this, I can agree with the fact that the album's mega-riffage, pounding drum + bass lines, and rough n' raw vocals, make it a definite must-have for all rock fans. // 10

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overall: 9
Led Zeppelin II Reviewed by: Naturalchampion, on april 19, 2011
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Sound: Classic rock at its finest. Led Zeppelin has some pretty sweet stuff that any rock or metal fan is going to enjoy. This album takes that to an extreme. Jimmy Page has always been an amazing guitarist and possibly an even more amazing writer and this is some of his best. There is alot of blues rock in this album and though I'm usually into the heavier stuff, the bluesy leads are really where this album shines, and it shines bright. It is no suprise that this album was voted to be one of the most influencial guitar albums of all time. // 9

Lyrics: Just like any other Zeppelin album this has some lyrics that really stick with you. In fact this album has some of the very most memorable lyrics in rock history. I doubt there is a rocker out there that isn't fimiliar with the fast paced up beat lyrics of Whole Lotta Love, but upbeat isn't all that Robert Plant exhales in. When you here some of the soft, poetic sounds matched with a weeping guitar you have no choice but to melt. // 9

Overall Impression: This is one of my very favorite Led Zeppelin albums. There is a few songs on it that define classic rock for me. This album includes one of the best and most memorable rock songs ever. Ramble On. I love this album. I love the way the songs seemlessly transition from faced paced rock n' roll to slow mellow bluesy rock. The only complaint about this album would be that it falls a little short at only 41 minutes. I have this album on my ipod, in my CD player, and ripped onto my computer. It's one of those albums everybody should own. // 9

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