Led Zeppelin III Review

artist: led zeppelin date: 03/16/2011 category: compact discs
led zeppelin: Led Zeppelin III
Released: Oct 5, 1970
Genre: Rock
Tones: Summery, Poignant, Rousing, Boisterous, Gleeful, Sentimental, Precious, Wistful, Raucous
Styles: Blues-Rock, Hard Rock, Heavy Metal British Metal
Number Of Tracks: 10
 Sound: 9.3
 Lyrics: 9.2
 Overall Impression: 9.3
 Overall rating:
 9.2 
 Reviewer rating:
 9.2 
 Users rating:
 9.1 
 Votes:
 74 
reviews (12) 23 comments vote for this album:
overall: 8.3
Led Zeppelin III Reviewed by: Da Jerk, on october 10, 2005
3 of 5 people found this review helpful

Sound: Led Zeppelin's third album, released in 1970, was a disappointment to many. By that time, the band had already built a reputation as one of the heaviest bands in the world, so it was a shock to many who listened to Led Zeppelin III for the first time. About half of the songs on this album are folk songs. While the band already had a few folk-based songs (including Babe I'm Gonna Leave You and Black Mountain Side), this album added another dimension to the band. The first half of the CD has the more rocking songs, including the most well-known song on the album, the opening Immigrant Song. There's also the heavy Out On The Tiles, with an incredible ending riff, the paranoid-sounding Celebration Day (featuring one of the best solos on the the album), and the highlight of the album, Since I've Been Loving You, a 7 1/2 minute blues masterpiece, featuring an amazing solo by Jimmy Page, one of his best moments ever (on record, that is). The rest of the album includes the aforementioned folk-styled songs. First, among the harder tunes, is Friends, an Eastern-influenced song with creative violin and guitar arrangements. There is also Gallows Pole, Zep's take on an old English folk song, Tangerine, which is the best of the folk songs here, with beautiful lyrics and a moving solo, That's The Way (perhaps a bit too long, but still a beautiful song), Bron-Y-Aur Stomp (a fun song about Robert Plant's dog, complete with Page's slide guitar) and Hats Off To (Roy) Harper, which is pretty much a mess. While it has a nice, almost haunting atmosphere, Plant's vocals are warped and the guitar is way too muddy. Fortunately, that's the only real weak point on the album. // 8

Lyrics: Here is where Zeppelin's lyrics really start to improve. At this point, Robert Plant begins writing the majority of the band's lyrics, and they start to tackle more subjects than females. Immigrant Song has some of the best lyrics on the album, the kind that paint images in your head (images of Vikings sailing about, slaughtering innocent civilians). Friends also has great lyrics, about, well friends. However, Plant still hasn't reached his creative peak lyrics-wise. // 9

Overall Impression: Though Led Zeppelin III was highly underrated when it was released (and still is now), it probably helped build Zeppelin's career in the long run by keeping things exciting and interesting. However, I wouldn't reccomend this album to people who haven't heard much Zep. My advice is to either grab the 2nd or 4th albums first, and if you like songs such as Going To California or Ramble On, give this one a shot. I would definitely buy this again if I lost it. // 8

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overall: 9
Led Zeppelin III Reviewed by: Skirvy, on july 30, 2008
2 of 3 people found this review helpful

Sound: I have been a Led Zeppelin fan for many years now, but it was only very recently that I discovered the beauty of the unsung hero of Zep albums. III recorded between January and July 1970 and was released October 5, 1970 by Atlantic Records. Many of the songs featured on the album were conceived in mid-1970 at Bron-Yr-Aur, an 18th century cottage in Gwynedd, Wales, on a hilltop overlooking the Dyfi Valley, three miles north of the market town Machynlleth. It showed a change in the sound of Zeppelin to a more experimental genre of rock, and acoustic. Although Jimmy Page still favored the guitar riff on songs such as the classic Immigrant Song and Celebration Day, he began to use a lot more acoustic guitar, in songs such as Tangerine, Friends, Bron Y Aur Stomp etc. He explored structures that he hadn't touched upon before such as the Bluesy improvised stylings of Since I've Been Loving You. The album was very innovative in itself but never reached the critical acclaim it deserved so was not as influential as it could of been. // 9

Lyrics: I fine point for Robert Plant in his career, his voice had really evolved by this point, and his voice was a natural fit for both the blues rock and acoutic sides of Zeppelin. The lyrical aspects of the album were also a fine point with "That's the Way", considered by Page to be a breakthrough for still-developing lyric writer Plant. // 9

Overall Impression: Led Zeppelin III is not Zeppelins greatest album, but was an important album in their career that helped them evolve as Songwriters and Musicians. The most impressive songs on the album are Immigrant Song, Friends, Celebration Day, Tangerine, Bron-Y-Aur Stomp, but don't listen to these songs by themselves, listen to the album as one, the way Zep intended, for the full experience! I love this album because Zep were not afraid to explore different genres such as their trademark folkey acoustic style, as well as keeping the Riff Oreintated Rock that made them famous. If I lost this album, of course I would buy it again! // 9

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overall: 10
Led Zeppelin III Reviewed by: unregistered, on june 27, 2005
1 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sound: This is one of Zeppelin's underrated albums. Even though it has its hits like The Immigrant Song and Since I've Been Loving You it isn't as well known and loved as Led Zeppelin 4 or Physical Graffiti. But Let me tell you that this album is absolutely incredible and if your a Zeppelin fan it is a must must have. Totally worth the $. // 10

Lyrics: The lyrics are very good and original. Some of Zeppelin's finest. And the vocals are great as usual. What else do you expect when Plant is in his prime. // 10

Overall Impression: A must have for your rock collection. But this is a different kind of Zeppelin album. It's good acoustic and rock. Their are 10 songs and I think like 5 or 6 are acoustic. The best songs are The Immigrant Song, Celebration Day, Since I've Been Loving You, Out On The Tiles, Tangerine, and That's The Way. Since I've Been Loving You and Tangerine are incredible! // 10

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overall: 8.7
Led Zeppelin III Reviewed by: ZeppelinZed, on february 10, 2006
1 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sound: After the realease of two albums and massive touring across both Europe and the US all in 1969, the boys of Led Zeppelin decided it was time for a change of pace. So, Led Zeppelin III was released in 1970 with a much different atmosphere than the previous two entries. The diverstiy that was hinted at through songs like Babe I'm Gonna Leave You, Black Mountain Side, and Ramble On all culimated in this mainly acoustic driven album recorded by the super group. However, don't fool yourself into thinking this piece only delivers unplugged rock, as the opening track of The Immigrant Song will soon prove you wrong. While this exhilerating starter is quite addicting, it does become repetitive after some time. The superior electric songs include the somewhat melancholy, up-beat Celebration Day, both a great intro and outro for Out On the Tiles, and Zeppelin III's true centerpiece, the most elctrifying blues song to date Since I've Been Loving You. Both Page and Plant absolutely soar on this paticular track, and JPJ deserves many accolades for his keyboard work. While Zeppelin examplifies that they can still rock the amps using those songs, the majority of the record incorporates a stripped down feel using acoustic guitars, mandolins, and tambourines. Friends utilizes a deep and dark guitar sound combined with violin interludes to create, in my view, a somewhat demonic mood to the song, which transgresses seamlessly into Celebration Day. Tangerine and Bron-Y-Aur-Stomp go hand in hand as love songs, though Tangerine appears to be more of a sappy ballad whereas Bron-Y-Aur-Stomp is more gleeful and slightly drunken. Hats off to (Roy) Harper contains a vibrant slide guitar section which accompanies Plant's muffled wailing very well. Admittedly, there must be a weakest track off the album, and That's the Way takes the position. I generally skip it each time. Which brings me finally to one of favorite Zeppelin songs period, Gallows Pole. Working from Page's finger picking guitar style, to Plant's irregular mellow singing, culimating in an orgy of music, including JPJ's mandolin and bass, some impressive drumming from Bonzo, and the strange additions of violin and banjo. The acoustic feel of this album would never truly resurface through the course of Zeppelin's career, which makes this recording a very unique look into a rarely seen side of the rock gods. Deservant of more recognition than it receives, but overall, because of it's great departure from what is known as Led Zeppelin, one of their weaker albums. // 9

Lyrics: Plant showcased his improvements lyrically through this album. Whther it was returning with a passion to the blues with Since I've Been Loving You, touching on his view of warfare through Immigrant Song (which is actually Zeppelins second song to reference The Lord of The Rings), or just sharing a laugh or two in Bron-Y-Aur-Stomp, the frontman utilized many characteristics. And if you need to hear some classic Plant screaming, Immigrant Song, Since I've Been Loving You, and Hats off To Roy Harper should do the trick. // 8

Overall Impression: Being the precursor to the untitled Zeppelin "IV," it was this albums fate to be overshadowed, which is beyond unfortunate. Led Zeppelin proved on this record that just because it lacks pickups does not mean it cannot rock! All four members went above and beyond on certain songs, while others seemed to be lacking or just unneccessary. Overall, if your Zepplein tastes are strictly Heartbreaker, Rock and Roll, and Black Dog, you might want to steer clear of this one. However, if you found Black Mountain Side, Ramble On, and Going To California to your liking, this could be the album for you! // 9

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overall: 9.7
Led Zeppelin III Reviewed by: SethMegadefan, on july 12, 2006
1 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sound: With the band's massively blues-induced first two records, Led Zeppelin established themselves as a tour de force of the hard rock genre. However, with their 1970 third album, they took a 180 degree turn and dropped almost all of their blues roots. After the exhausting Led Zeppelin II tour, the band traveled to a cottage named Bron-Yr-Aur in the village of Gynedd, Wales, where they wrote the majority of the album. This is also perhaps the reason the content of most of the songs turned out drastically softer than anything the band had previously done. Sure, your signature Led Zeppelin rocker tunes are still here ("The Immigrant Song", "Out on the Tiles", "Celebration Day"), but throughout some of the first half and almost all of the tail end of the album, the band shows an immensely folk-induced sound. "Gallows Pole" is actually a Zep spin on an old English folk tune. The first half of the album focuses mainly on the more rocking tunes (with the exception of "Friends"). There's even a brilliant 7+ minute ballad thrown into the mix ("Since I've Been Loving You"), which, though it showcases each member's abilities the most equally on the whole album, showcases above all Page's brilliant solo improvisation. The second half of the album, however, is definitely the high-point of the record. "Gallows Pole" is a brilliantly-paced folk tune about how all of a man's family members come and try to bargain with the hangman to get him not to hang the main character, but nothing works. It starts off as a very slow acoustic number, but erupts into a foot-stomping hoe-down, and is something that only Zeppelin could've pulled off so gracefully. "Tangerine" is an exceptional country-esque number, that tells the tale of Plant's long lost love. "That's the Way" is about a young boy whose mom tells him he can't play with a certain young girl anymore, because "Mama said that's the way it oughtta stay". Page's desolate acoustic strums and distant ambient guitar fills make the song a haunting masterpiece. Then comes the foot-stomping "Bron-Y-Aur Stomp" (an odd typo on the cottage Bron-Yr-Aur), which, between Page's maniacal fingerpicked acoustic strums & runs, Plant's wonderful harmonized verses, Jones' flawless acoustic bass walk-downs, and Bonham's incredibly simple but catchy bass & tambourine beats, make the song shine through as one of the highlights of the album (it's my personal favorite, anyway). Then comes the closer, "Hats off to (Roy) Harper", which has Plant's odd tremolo voice effects piping over Page's bluesy steel sliding guitar effects, in tribute to folk legend Roy Harper. It doesn't exactly provide an adequate album closer, but the song manages to still be pretty catchy. // 9

Lyrics: As with the musical content of this record as compared to the previous two, lyrically the band takes on different perspectives as well. "The Immigrant Song" talks about Vikings sailing and conquering foreign lands. "Since I've Been Loving You" puts Plant up front singing distraught and monumental verses about how he's tiring of his ever repetitious lifestyle. "That's the Way" is undoubtedly the lyrical high-point of the album, which describes hauntingly how Plant is forced to cut off his relationship from a young girl only because his mother tells him to, and how he has to confront her crying and tell her why. This is probably Zeppelin's second best album lyrically, right behind the wonderful mysticism behind the lyrics of the Houses of the Holy album. // 10

Overall Impression: If I told you that this album would be pleasing to the more rocking type of people, I might be lying a bit. The first half of the album has a few good rocking tunes, but if you're not too much into the folk side of things, you probably won't like this album as much. I personally view it as one of the band's best (it's in my top 5, no doubt), because it's such a brilliant blend of folk, rock, and even country. The album serves up a pretty ridiculous amount of diversity, especially for only having 10 tracks. But whenever I've got 40 minutes to spare, I can guarantee you I'll probably pop Led Zeppelin III into the CD player. // 10

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overall: 9.3
Led Zeppelin III Reviewed by: Shifty155, on march 07, 2007
1 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sound: The sound in Led Zeppelin III is the most unique in any of their albums. It starts off with some well known tracks, Immigrant Song, for example, is the albums opening song. They also have one of my favorite songs ever on the album "Celebration Day". The whole CD takes a turn after the four rock songs are over. After Immigrant Song comes "Friends" which was influenced by Middle Eastern music (according to John Paul Jones) and features strings (which are put to good use). "Gallows Pole" is a remake of an old British folk tale, and uses mandolins, banjos, accordions, and almost any other folk instrument you can think of. Then comes "Tangerine" which is actually my least favorite acoustic song on the album. I don't find it that interesting. "That's The Way", which is one of the most relaxed Zeppelin songs ever, may carry on a bit to long, but it is still a great song. Then comes the knockout. Bron Yr Aur Stomp. This has to be one of my favorite songs of all time, and is about Plant's dog, "Strider". It features a little slide guitar, a catchy guitar, and wonderful lyrics. The last track "Hats Off To Harper" is the worst song on the album. It consists of only Page and Plant. Plant has a distorted voice, and Page uses a slide guitar for the entire song. It's the worst song on the album. // 9

Lyrics: What is there to say? Plant delivers with some of my favorite lyrics. The lyrics on "Celebration Day" don't make to much sense to me, and I don't even know what Plant is saying on "Hats Off To Harper", but other than that, the lyrics are top notch. The best song (lyrically) has to be Immigrant Song. I just love it. // 10

Overall Impression: This is one of my favorite Zeppelin albums, and I just wish they had more like it. I wish their newer albums had as much acoustic tracks as this one did. The acoustic songs are my favorite, and would definitely buy it again if it was stolen (after I hunted down the thief and kicked his face in, that is). // 9

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overall: 8
Led Zeppelin III Reviewed by: Infinite-Reason, on september 30, 2003
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: The third album from Zeppelin showcases some of the group's "mellower" side. Page picks up his acoustic for the majority of the tracks on this album and is accompanied by Jones' mandolin, Plant's lyrics, and Bonham's rhythmic beats. All of these make for a great cd but not one of Zeppelin's best. // 8

Lyrics: Plant's lyrics have vastly improved since their debut album. Along with Page, and on the odd occasion Jones and Bonham, the lyrics on this CD are more deep than say "Whole Lotta Love". // 8

Overall Impression: Overall, this album is great with tracks such as "Immigrant song" and "Out on the Tiles" staying true to the heavy Zeppelin sound and tracks "That's the Way", "Bron-Y-Aur-Stomp", and "Gallow's Pole" showcasing the acoustic talent of the band. Not one of their best, or well-known, CDs, but its still a CD worthwhile of buying. // 8

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overall: 10
Led Zeppelin III Reviewed by: unregistered, on december 20, 2004
0 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sound: The sound on Led Zeppelin III is fantastic. They create often a sort of electro-acoustic feel with amazing solos from Jimmy Page (guitarist). John Bonham hits the drums with steady rhythm and strength to keep the beat going, and uses the cymbals to create a fantastic 'soft' feel. The bassist John Paul is very adept as his role. Robert Plant, the vocalist, has a great voice, filling the songs with emotion. I rate this 5 because it's sounds like Led Zeppelin. The best songs are all but the outstanding ones are 'Celebration Day' (2) and 'Tangerine' (6). // 10

Lyrics: The lyrics are very nice, which go perfectly with the music. In 'Tangerine', the lyrics are amazingly sad, making you really feel. They really are some of the best lyrics ever made. // 10

Overall Impression: This album is perhaps one of the best, although many dislike it for it's more acoustic feel. I love it, everything about it. The only weaker things about it are songs 8 and 9 which are slightly weaker than the others. If it was stolen or lost I would buy it or copy it without question, one hundred times over. Buy it, or lose out on the greatest rock band ever! // 10

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overall: 10
Led Zeppelin III Reviewed by: theDEFTONEr, on january 03, 2005
0 of 3 people found this review helpful

Sound: I honestly think that this is Led Zeppelin's best album. The tracks are vibrant and full of good sound. There are tracks like "No Quarter" and "The Song Remains The Same" which have a more electronic sound, with more keyboards. Then there is "The Ocean" whcih brings us back to the searing Zeppelin guitar we all love. "Over The Hills And Far Away" starts acuistic, then turns electric halfway through, this one is probably the best example of the sound for this album. // 10

Lyrics: Robert Plant and Jimmy Page are and always have been decent lyric writers. Enough said there. Plant has the usual vocal stylings on this album, only he has a strangly female sounding voice on "The Same Remains The Same." // 10

Overall Impression: As I said before, this is Zeppelin's best. All the songs are incredibly good for me accept "The Crunge" which is a little too Rocky III for me. None of the other albums have this kind of sound diversity. And yes, of course I would go out and buy another if mine were misplaced. // 10

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overall: 9.7
Led Zeppelin III Reviewed by: Faydock, on november 19, 2005
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: Not the best but still a great album by Led Zeppelin. The third self-titled Led Zeppelin album released in late 1970, is one of the more folk sounding albums with a Jimmy Page playing a lot more acoustic guitar, such as on Bron-Y-Aur Stomp, Gallows Pole, Tangerine, That's The Way, and then there are also the hard rocking Zeppelin tunes like Immigrant Song and Celebration Day as well as the bluesier sounding Since I've Been Loving You. This is an album I recommend for those who enjoy folk music or acoustic rock. // 10

Lyrics: The lyrics aren't the strongest point of III, but what really makes this album great is Robert Plant's voice who was in his prime around this time, more noticable in Immigrant Song. // 9

Overall Impression: Although not my favorite album by Zeppelin they still did a great job, this is one of the albums that keeps me playing some acoustic every once in awhile. The sound isn't much of what I'm used to but it still sounds awesome and I constantly find myself listening to this. // 10

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overall: 9
Led Zeppelin III Reviewed by: ledhed503, on february 15, 2011
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: Led Zeppelin does a great job expanding their sound on this album, while also keeping true to their bluesy background. On songs like "That's the Way" and "Gallows Pole", they begin to demonstrate their folk influences, while on "Immigrant Song" and "Out on the Tiles" they retain their hard rock edge. Page's solos in "Since I've Been Loving You" are some of the best of his career. John Paul Jones also does a great job on bass, but he really manages to shine on mandolin on "Gallows Pole" and "Tangerine". John Bonham, being the best drummer alive at this time, does a superb job on the drums, especially on "Out on the Tiles" with its confusing rhythm. // 10

Lyrics: Lyrical content is very strong. "That's the Way" has some of the best lyrics ever written by Plant. Plant gave a great performance on this album, although I personally can't stand the intro to "Immigrant Song" (it's even worse live!) Possibly his strongest performances are on "Friends" and "Since I've Been Loving You." His voice overall is one of Zeppelin's greatest assets. // 8

Overall Impression: This album has a great variety of songs, ranging from bluesy classics to folk songs. The best songs are "Immigrant Song", "Since I've Been Loving You" and "Bron-Y-Aur Stomp." My personal favorite would have to be "That's the Way" because of its lyrics and the beautiful acoustic guitar work. The thing I love most about the album is the variety of music types present on it, especially on the second half of the album. My main problem with it is Plant's sound on "Immigrant Song" and "Hats Off to (Roy) Harper", although this is not a huge problem. // 9

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overall: 9
Led Zeppelin III Reviewed by: Dragforce92, on march 16, 2011
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: Led Zeppelin III... Often considered the "acoustic album" does fit the description, but it's often overlooked. This album shows the mastermind behind the great guitar work of Jimmy Page as it does the intense power that John Paul Jones contributes. I've owned this album for years but it hasn't been until only a week ago that I relistened to this album and truely thought that it was a work of art rather than just another Zeppelin album. It contains some of the bands finest work such as "Since I've Been Loving You", "Friends" and "Immigrant Song", three classics that have been included on several box discs and greatest hits collections, but what about the others such as "Tangerine", "Gallow's Pole" and "That's the Way", also phenominal pieces that just show the talent of each member. The whole point of it being acoustic seems like something the band wouldnt consider, but they showed that acoustic could still rock harder than anyone once thought. // 9

Lyrics: Robert Plant has always been a great singer, theres never a doubt that if theres a countdown hes always in the top 5. This album may be heavily based on acoustic work but it didn't stop Plant from using his powerful screams (the scream in "Since I've Been Loving You" is just spine-tingling) and the way he uses his quieter voice displays emotions you wouldn't expect from such a heavy rock & roll band. // 9

Overall Impression: This is probably in the realms of top 10 albums of all time, regardless of how uncommon the songs are played on the radio. I guarentee that the only song that gets frequent airtime is "Immigrant Song" which is sad because this album deserves more recognition. I love this album for it shows how Led Zeppelin as a whole band is unstoppable with anything they choose to do. Its such a shame they will never be again, that is the dream I wish for that I know will never happen. Anyway, this album is rich in sound, feel/emotion, sweat, and balls... but that shouldn't deter you in anyway, it will blow your mind. // 9

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