Movement Review

artist: new order date: 07/02/2012 category: compact discs
new order: Movement
Released: Nov 13, 1981
Genre: Post-Punk
Label: Factory
Number Of Tracks: 8
"Movement", despite being a great record, arguably lacks a bit of an identity. It's essentially a post-punk record, with only a few electronic influences, with many elements still reminiscent from Joy Division.
 Sound: 9
 Lyrics: 8
 Overall Impression: 8
 Overall rating:
 7.2 
 Reviewer rating:
 8.3 
 Users rating:
 6 
 Votes:
 6 
review (1) 1 comment vote for this album:
overall: 8.3
Movement Reviewed by: Pol-Pot-Smoker, on july 02, 2012
2 of 2 people found this review helpful

Sound: New Order was a band formed after Joy Division's breakup due to the death of Ian Curtis, and in their career they arguably went further musically than their previous band, experimenting with many elements of electronic music (most notable example of this being their hit single "Blue Monday", which is regarded as one of the pillars of electronic music). But that evolution would only happen after this album. "Movement", despite being a great record, arguably lacks a bit of an identity. It's essentially a post-punk record, with only a few electronic influences, with many elements still reminiscent from Joy Division. It's like they wanted to move on and make new music, but they didn't knew what exactly they wanted to do musically, so they basically kept doing exactly what they were doing before Curtis' death. Now, I think I would be just fine if they wanted to only play post-punk forever (since I love this album), but their later musical evolution made so many awesome tunes and records, and played such a big influence on electronic music... So you can't try to review this album without criticising this point. In other words, it's a transition album. A transition between Joy Division's musical aspects and New Order's brand new musical aspects. Anyway, like I've said before, this album is still a beautiful piece of music. These guys made it very obvious on Joy Division's albums that they were capable of creating great atmospheres, and this here is not different, doing it with guitars ("Dreams Never End"), or keyboards ("Truth") or both of them ("Doubts Even Here"). // 9

Lyrics: On a lyrical aspect, the album also reeks of Joy Division, approaching things like pessimism, isolation and depression. For an example, "Chosen Time", with some of the lyrics being "Sometimes the dreams are better/One thing you hold", or "Denial": "All of this is a gift, such a painful companion/Inside of me". See, it's impossible to avoid criticising the Joy Division similarity here, like I've said, and the vocals are the main reason for me to come back to this point (again). Bernard Sumner's singing almost sounds like an imitation of Ian Curtis (you know, the depressed, deep tone of his voice is clearly reproduced here). He would also develop a style of singing of his own, later, and that's also what brought me back to the "identity" thing here. Still, leaving the "identity" discussion behind and going to the partial side, they all help to make this album the beautiful piece of music it is, and the singing fits perfectly in the mood of the songs and in the lyrics. // 8

Overall Impression: I would not say that this album is parameter for New Order, since they clearly went on different musical directions after this record, but it's still a pretty nice album. The most impressive songs from the album are, in my opinion, "Doubts Even Here", "Senses" and "Denial". But I would highlight the whole album if I could, really. While there's too much Joy Division here, I don't think it compromises my love with this album, since music is after all meant to bring you emotions and this gives me the effin' chills. I would definitely go after this album again if it were stolen, lost, or anything like that, just like all New Order's records. // 8

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