The Downward Spiral Review

artist: nine inch nails date: 10/07/2008 category: compact discs
nine inch nails: The Downward Spiral
Released: Mar 8, 1994
Genre: Rock
Styles: Alternative Metal, Industrial, Alternative Pop/Rock, Industrial Metal
Number Of Tracks: 14
The Downward Spiral is full of striking sonic juxtapositions and sudden about-faces in tone, which make for a fascinating listen.
 Sound: 9.5
 Lyrics: 8.7
 Overall Impression: 9.7
 Overall rating:
 9.5 
 Reviewer rating:
 9.3 
 Users rating:
 9.6 
 Votes:
 93 
reviews (11) 24 comments vote for this album:
overall: 9.3
The Downward Spiral Reviewed by: skellyscribbles, on may 20, 2008
9 of 9 people found this review helpful

Sound: Its rare to find an album so diverse, touching so many corners of dynamics and timbres, that every song conjures up a feeling or memory. Downward Spiral achieves this, which makes it so appealing. The textures in downward spiral never cease to enchant and engage me. The soft "chss" sound at the start of eraser, for example, reminds me of blowing air through a straw; the machine loop of ruiner, being true to the name Industrial. On no album have I heard so many layers that every time I listen I find something new in the frey. // 10

Lyrics: One of Trents strengths and weaknesses: His lyrics can sometimes being cringe-worthy and overbearing, and sometimes so brutal and true that it reaches out and tells you something you've been thinking all along. Lyrics-wise, this is Nine Inch nails greatest album, in particular Hurt, which makes me shudder with his soft, then grating singing. Vocals on this album, as usual, are a particularly strong, as they fit perfectly with the sound. "I do not want this" is my favourite song, with a warning repetition of the title, then and blast of defiance, "don't you tell me how I feel!". // 8

Overall Impression: 4x platinum, no. 2 only billboard 100, cover by Jonny Cash and more "top 100 albums" lists than you could possibly count. There's a reason for all this. This is definately one of my favourite albums of all time, so varied yet united by a feeling of being so alone. In the year 2408 this will be considered 20th century Mozart. // 10

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overall: 9.3
The Downward Spiral Reviewed by: caseygustaveson, on november 18, 2004
2 of 3 people found this review helpful

Sound: This is one of the best sounding records that I have heard yet. You can tell Trent Renzor put alot of thought and dedication into this albumn. Even if you are not a fan of NIN this albumn still deserves an entire listening through. This is an encrible albumn, and like all thoe others he wrote, performed and recorded the entire thing alone! // 10

Lyrics: The lyrics are all verry good. They go from being to as emotional as the the masterpiece Hurt, to as raw as Closer. It goes on all types of subjects between abandonment of God, to narrating a mental break down in song form. Although some are Cliche like Closer, they are what I think to be verry well thought out lyrics with impressive talent of singing them. // 8

Overall Impression: This is easily in my top 10 albumns. If I lost this album at any time, I would buy it the same day. This is in my oppinon, the best album Trent Renzor has created yet. I strongly urge to individuals who have not purchased this album or even herd of Nine Inch Nails, to buy this. // 10

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overall: 9.3
The Downward Spiral Reviewed by: DaddyTwoFoot, on december 21, 2004
2 of 2 people found this review helpful

Sound: The sound on this album is great. It goes from pulsating, powerful sounds like Closer that build up sonic tension and unleash it in small bursts of energy, to quiet, soft, and haunting sounds, like the beautiful Hurt. Excellent sound all around. // 10

Lyrics: Trent Reznor is an amazing singer, going from whisper to blodd-curdling screams in an instant. The lyrics are sometimes too personal to really judge them, because you don't know what Trent is trying to get out of his system. The lyrics match the amazing music very well. // 8

Overall Impression: This album is one of the top albums of its entire genre. My favorite songs are "Mr. Self Destruct" and "Hurt." I can't think of anything I really don't like about this album. If I somehow lost possession of it, I would go get it in an instant. If you are even the slightest, tiniest bit interested in industrial music, check this album out. // 10

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overall: 9
The Downward Spiral Reviewed by: bassplayer496, on july 29, 2008
2 of 3 people found this review helpful

Sound: It's hard to describe the sound. You just have to hear it. I think I once heard Reznor describe it as having soundscapes inspired by David Bowie's "Low," but having "a million electrical disturbances." This is musically and vocally the closest Trent's come to industrial metal. With the distorted vocals and pounding drum machines, the opening song "Mr. Self Destruct" is a good example of what you're in for. Then the next song, "Piggy" is more of a slow and creepy song, and the rest of the album ranges, but the production is top notch and I don't think Trent's ever had a better sound. // 9

Lyrics: While the lyrics aren't great, they're certainly not as bad as some people say. The lyrics might be slightly self obsessed, but the song "Hurt" shows how good they can be nonetheless. And Trent has a good voice, which can range from regular singing, to shouting, screaming, or haunting whispering. And I must say, while the lyrics aren't great, they in no way detract from the album's greatness for me. // 8

Overall Impression: I actually have a hard time reviewing this album, because it was my favorite album for over a year, and now it's a close second (Lateralus by Tool is first). There's not a single song I don't like on this album. It was released after Pretty Hate Machine and Broken, and basically mixes the synth of Pretty Hate Machine and the Guitars of Broken to a perfect match. This is a concept album, and the title can explain the concept well enough, and it deserves to be listened to. When Rolling stone did the 500 greatest albums, this one made the cut as #200, and it's well deserved. Even for people who aren't fan's of industrial, really give this a listen. This is the album that got me into more underground industrial like Skinny Puppy or Wumpscut. I hope this album can change the world of music for you like it did for me. // 10

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overall: 9.7
The Downward Spiral Reviewed by: unregistered, on august 14, 2006
1 of 2 people found this review helpful

Sound: Trent Reznor has almays used a very mechanical sound. He mixes things like a melodic piano and heavy distortion. With that he puts in a strong sense of agony, abandonment, and remorse. I have always loved this combination and this CD is a masterpiece when it comes to this. Songs like "A Warm Place", "Hurt", and "The Becoming" make my skin curl. // 10

Lyrics: Do I even need to mention lyrics? His lyrics are just poetry and it has to be some of the best I've ever heard. Some of the lyrics and actual music kinda don't mix with eachother, but it's still awesome. His vocals are excellent and fit perfectly with his lyrics. // 9

Overall Impression: There's only one "Nine Inch Nails". Their sound is "deeply, darkly catchy". My favorite songs on this album have to be (of course) "Hurt", "Piggy", and "Mr. Self Destruct". I love the production style of Trent Reznor and his voice. There's nothing to hate about it. And if it were stolen or lost, first I'd go get a new CD the same day then put it in my CD player to listen to it in my car while I track down and kill the person who stole it. // 10

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overall: 8
The Downward Spiral Reviewed by: VidGamer870, on march 24, 2008
1 of 4 people found this review helpful

Sound: This album, Nine Inch Nails' 2nd, has a relatively electronic sound to it for rock/metal. Trent Reznor's knack for using samples is also somewhat apparent (part of the drumbeat in "Closer", possibly Nine Inch Nails' biggest hit, is borrowed from the Iggy Pop song "Nightclubbing"). Each song is also layered with distortion, a fact that I am not a fan of. With all that in mind, this is probably the album that best represents the band's sound, and is in that respect their definitive album (though "With Teeth" remains my favorite). // 7

Lyrics: The record, a concept album along the lines of Pink Floyd's "The Wall," tells the of a man's path to destruction and his subsequent demise. Because of that, the album is relatively deep lyrically. The low point in that respect is "Closer" and the high point "Hurt", the latter the album's final song. Vocally, Trent Reznor's voice is as scratchy as ever. // 9

Overall Impression: The album as a whole is very good, but sound-wise isn't my taste. I have always liked more traditional-sounding rock music, which is why, as I mentioned above, "With Teeth" appeals so much to me. I still enjoy this record, though. The standout songs to me are "Closer" (for it's music), the fast-paced "March of the Pigs", "Reptile", and "Hurt", one of the band's deeper songs. I would probably buy it again if stolen. // 8

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overall: 9.3
The Downward Spiral Reviewed by: unregistered, on june 03, 2008
1 of 7 people found this review helpful

Sound: The Downward Spiral. Probably the most influential industrial album out there. This is not Broken part two, but the famous screaming from Trent are still here. Distorted vocals, distorted guitars, and techno loops are presents here to bring something new to the table. This is an excellent album, even soundwise. The slow peacefulness of a Warm Place to the violent and chugging Reptile. The sound is great, overall. // 9

Lyrics: Trent is an odd lyrcist. Looking at the Downward Spiral booklet, the lyrics were incredibly interested because he doesn't follow the traditional chorus verse outline, Trent wants to tell a story. The best lyrical example is Hurt or the title track, due to it's simplicity and effectiveness. // 10

Overall Impression: No words can describe this album. I have no major problems with this album. 01. Mr. Self-Destruct- kind of slow at the beginning, but turns into a barrage of screams and guitar. It's alright. 02. Piggy- I hate this song. It is slow, has a steady beat, but doesn't really go anywhere song wise. This is the first we see of the many refrences to pigs in NIN's work. 03. Heresy- Great song, it is about denying God or something like that. Great catchy beat the beginning, and there is great singing in this. 04. March of the Pigs- This ia one of NIN's classics, but it is extremely short. The riveting beat and screams are the highlight, and it includes a jarring piano section in the climax. 05. Closer- This song is legend! This is NIN's superhit and if you were download a song from them, this would be it. THe slow, griding beat that seems to fit in nightclubs and the ending is the best part. Just a great song overall 06. Ruiner- This song's chorus is pretty good, even though it seems to be refering to a penis. "how'd you get so big? How you get so hard? How you get so strong? How you get so long?" It has a great beat to it. 07. The Becoming- Is this song about rape, because the women screaming at the beginning is odd. The chorus and acoustic outro is great. 08. I Don't Want This- This song is dull and boring, I am not even going to review it. 09. Big Man With Gun- Eh. It's okay, the lyrics are good, but the song is short and uneventful. 10. A Warm Place- A good song. The only really slow soft song in the album, something you wouldn't expect from this album so far, 11. Eraser- This song shows Reznor's simple, yet effective lyrics. It starts off slow, though. 12. Reptile- An excellent song. It has a slow, killer beat that sounds like meat getting cut up. THe lyrics are impressive, something about a whore. 13. The Downward Spiral- A song about depression and suicide. This song demostrates Reznor's audio representation of a story being told. The screaming in the background can only represent the character's thoughts and agnoy. Truly a masterpiece. 14. Hurt- Another standout on the album. It has a acoustic guitar playing an out of tune riff that represent the out of tune mind of hte character. It's a good sad soft that really has an ugly ending which I hate. Overall the album is great and I recommend buying it. // 9

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overall: 10
The Downward Spiral Reviewed by: MetalMegaMan, on october 07, 2008
1 of 4 people found this review helpful

Sound: The album constantly skirts the line between noise and melody in much the same way the character described in the lyrics will struggle between humanity and nihilism. Trent Reznor uses every instrument to it's full potential including his voice. The samples symbolize what is going on in the story told throughout the album. The guitar will switch between acoustic and distorted depending on the mood and power of the character. The drums emphasize when something tragic is happening in the story. His vocals obviously show the emotion in the man to the fullest extent. Every song is filled with a vast amount of emotion and feeling. // 10

Lyrics: Stripped down and reduced to its basic framework, The Downward Spiral is the state of modern man living in a world of absolute ideologies that have escaped his grasp and now betray him rather than serve him. It is man in a world that shackles him with the freedom it promises, and draws him to either stagnation, abuse, or self destruction. Mr. Self-Destruct: A song that hints at the themes of the album, and foreshadows the events that are to come. The implications are that self-destruction lies in what you desire the most, because it is that which holds the true power over you. Piggy: The actual story begins with with this song. Piggy refers to an ex-lover who no longer needed the character. When the main character is rejected, his control is shattered and he's left impotent. The piggy's ability to escape his grasp injures him to the core and leaves him chanting pathetically the mantra that will re-manifest itself later on, "nothing can stop me now." Heresy: This song is about the man's metaphysical rebellion against God and the kingdom of God. When the character dethrones God in a fit of indignation, he does more than just kill the deity. When the kingdom of God falls all that was tied to it falls as well, including any sense of meaning or moral order. Although he does not yet realize it, this act that promised absolute freedom ensures that the character will be enslaved. March Of the Pigs: The song is a clear denunciation of a greedy, cannibalistic world whose members thrive on watching the downfall of others. The character's hatred of this world makes him desire it to suffer the same fate to which it condemns its victims. The world he sees himself up against is not a world of humans, but God's kingdom of pigs made in His image. The man cannot connect with this world, cannot come to terms with its uncaring disposition. He is unable to see others as human, unable to love or trust another. He can't be a part of the world so it must pay. Closer: is about how the complete submission of his partner to all his abuses empowers him in the most complete way. And through this empowerment he is able to escape his life as a helpless victim and feel what he perceives to be the control of God. The character knows that, on some level, his control is an illusion, but he accepts it anyway. In fact, one of the paradoxes of his life, at this point, is that he is ready to surrender himself completely for control of another. Ruiner: is about the most explicit condemnation of not only God, as the ultimate abuser and deceiver, but as well as of any faith in God. The man's perception of his relationship with God is one of control and abuse. It is the same as the relationship he had with the piggy and with society, only the roles are reversed. He is now at the height of his power, and the mantra of "nothing can stop me now" is no longer weak and pathetic as it was in piggy. But he is cut short in mid-sentence at the end of the song: "nothing can stop...." Apparently something can and will stop him, something that has been working against him all along, something with more power to hurt him than God; the source of his deception, himself. The Becoming: is about when he begins to realize what kind of path he is truly on. The suffering man who once rebelled against the cruel nature of his situation now finds inside himself something crueler; the nihilistic voice of indifference. After God is eliminated, the focus on the album is on a new struggle, an internal one. The humanity of the man finds itself up against its mechanical counterpart. Deeper than his conflict with God, this conflict threatens to take his humanity from him and replace it with a mechanical world of social and moral stagnation. At this point the man knows what he has done, knows that he has betrayed himself, but doesn't know what to do about it. Then the song breaks, something within the man cannot accept what is happening, and is trying to resist, but can't find the strength to do anything but to hide passively. It knows it can't remain hidden forever, but it cannot act. Backed into a corner, the human voice finally discovers the strength to protest, moving from passive to active resistance, with a tortured scream, "it won't give up. it wants me dead, god damn this noise inside my head." I Do Not Want This: At this point something changes the music becomes more chaotic and piercing; as the human voice is once again ready to be subdued, another option is discovered. The next phase of the metaphysical rebellion becomes clear in the midst of the noise. The mechanical voice was able to arise out of the absence of meaning, so perhaps the character can escape it by establishing a new moral order. He reaches for the unoccupied throne. His voice is dripping with desire as he utters those words laced with sexual potency. Finally, he tells himself, I will have absolute power. I will be totally free. I will be untouched by the limits of humanity. Finally he rises up and does something that matters. Now he will become the ruiner. Big Man With A Gun: The man is now in God's position. But just as the ruiner terrorized him, he will terrorize others. His whole conception of God was of one who controlled and abused, not because the nature of God is such, but because his nature is such. The man's tragic flaw is that he is unable to connect with the world around him, to see others as humans rather than pigs, and because of this he can only be a ruiner. This kingdom of man is loud, violent, frantic, and anything but stable. As the man screams, "nothing can stop me now," his world is once again collapsing around him. Try as he might, man cannot take the place of God; it is not within his power. So the character's attempt to assume the role fails, throwing him back to the fate that had already almost conquered him; his mechanical side. A Warm Place: is as sad as it is beautiful. Following the failing fury of "big man with a gun," this instrumental is hauntingly tranquil. The song represents a major turning point in the story; it is a tragic moment of profound realization. All that he has done has finally been made clear, his shift from ruined to ruiner, and his role at the center of it all. He realizes that his entire life has been a continuing cycle of inflicting pain upon others in order to escape his own pain, and the humanity still intact within him is horrified. He sees the violence he is, and will be, responsible for. A new option is opened up for him, a new way to escape the mechanical voice that has retreated but is not yet conquered: death. No longer will he seek to escape himself through others, he tells himself. He is willing to accept the pain of his life and break the cycle in the only way he sees possible. There are no audible lyrics to this song but in the first 15 seconds there is a faint whisper reapeating "The best thing about life is knowing you put it together." Eraser: is basically a vocalization of the revelations made in a warm place. The violence he directs towards himself is desperate, he needs someone to end his life. He's not yet willing to do this himself, to take that final step in which he will reject, in the only way possible to him at this point, the unacceptable nature on which his life was based. The final step taken on the road to the downward spiral occurs at this stage where he has accepted death but still cannot pull the trigger. Indecision causes him to once again look for another way out. It seems as if the character went to a prostitute, or a woman with the same degree of indifference as one, in order to find some alternative kind of control; one that requires him to give nothing, and yet harms nobody. However, what he finds within her and within himself only serves to utterly disgust him. His description of her in reptile is cold and unflattering, to say the least. Reptile: In the reptile he finds the icy indifference he is fleeing from within himself. She is a liar who will submit to his desires and say what he wants to hear, but means none of it.She is incapable of feeling anything towards him and supplies him with sex as freely as she did for the man before him and will for the man after. When he says, "my disease my infection, i am so impure," he realizes that he is once again being driven by his disease and impurity (his need to control others) and accepts the fact that he has lost all his options. In the midst of the song there is a cut back to the music of a warm place, once again signifying realization. The Downward Spiral: begins with static followed by an acoustic guitar striking the end notes of closer, establishing the link between the two songs, illustrating the way in which his false notions about God, sex and control led him to the events described in the downward spiral. The mechanical side of the character observes the suicide in a detached manner, as if it isn't affected; watches as the gun is now aimed at its wielder just as it was once aimed at another in big man with a gun. The recurring imagery of the gun (a phallic symbol which represented his idea of godlike control through sex) being pointed to someone's head shows that the violent nature of the ruiner he had become is now completely focused upon himself, actually becoming the agent of his demise. But now something has changed. There has been a shift, from "he couldn't believe how easy it was," to "spilling out of my head." The man is doing more than escaping the mechanical voice through suicide more importantly, he is killing it along with him. The man knew that, due to his inability to relinquish his need for control, he had no chance to escape indifference, so he sacrificed his life rather than letting it overcome him, thus unknowingly affirming a solid value, a meaning: Human feeling over nihilistic indifference. The tragedy is that he could only make this affirmation through an act that is essentially nihilistic. Hurt: is the most solitary manifestation of the human voice. In theory this is a triumph, a victory for humanity, but in reality it was too costly. Even though the human side of the man is what somehow survives beyond death, it is still scarred, unfamiliar with anything other than pain. He now reflects on what he has done and regrets it. The purity and unity that he sought in life still hasn't been found. This final "verse" is proof of the character's growth. Tragically, it is after his death that he reaches this point. He boldly affirms his desire to keep his humanity as a value and a meaning that human beings can realize. Hurt is the purest statement of the man's feelings, the most personal song Reznor claims to have written. // 10

Overall Impression: This album has definitely made a great impression on not only me, but many others. As human beings, we must learn to live as human beings and to do without the absolutes we can never obtain. It is time to forget about the absolute freedom that can only be obtained at the expense of others. In order to experience freedom, we must let others be free by allowing them to have what we want for ourselves. Only then can our lives as humans affirm any real value, only then will relationships stop being tyrannical and be based on free and mutual giving as well as receiving. We must find ourselves; learn once again how to care for others as well as ourselves, only then, can we escape nihilism and violence. I cannot compare this album to any other. Trent Reznor has accomplished his career by writing this album; making it pure genius. // 10

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overall: 9
The Downward Spiral Reviewed by: Hypnot1st, on october 17, 2005
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: Trent Reznor put a recognizable face on industrial music, which tried to sound mechanical. Reznor practically pioneered the Industrial genre with his first CDs. Many people immediatly dismiss The Downward Spiral because it is so aggressive and depressive, and rightly so. This album is revolutionary, but not exactly excellent music. It is a complete hit or miss CD, and music genre also. Music is amazing, especially the loops, lyrics are a bit of a drag. // 9

Lyrics: The lyrics are more poetry than song lyrics. And I don't mean big rhyming poems, they are exactly like "goth poetry" describing hate, pain, and death. Even though I don't think the lyrics are exactly enjoyable, since they do concern death, rape, killing, God, and all that good stuff, they certainly deserve attention for being different and unique. Hurt, Reznor's superhit, you can't mention Nine Inch Nails without Hurt. Hurt is a phenomenal piece of writing, as well as a phenomenal song. This song alone pays for 11.99 (or whatever the CD costs) alone. Trent isn't a very good singer at this point in time, but it only helps the mood of the songs, matching the music much better. // 8

Overall Impression: Incredible album, good lyrics, very solid musical piece overall. The album as a whole is great, but some individual songs are weak if they are not listened to as a concept album. Hurt, Closer, and Reptile are big hits. I recommend the new special edition, with 2 disks, both 5.1 SACD, sounds great. I would buy the special edition again, but probably not the regular CD. // 10

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overall: 10
The Downward Spiral Reviewed by: unregistered, on february 08, 2007
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: When I first heard "Mr. Self-Destruct," I didn't like it at first, now I listen to it every chance I get. The ending really creeps other people out when I listen to this song, it reminds me of a lot of bees hovering over you and you're trying to shake them off, this probably represents trying to escape pain and anger. "A Warm Place" reminds me of finally escaping pain, you're happy and you get that comfortable feeling inside when you listen to it. When the song is over, it reminds me of being disturbed and you're interrupted from your warm place. That's when it gets to the song "Eraser." "The Downward Spiral" really set off my emotions, when I was listening to it I felt this dark and depressing spiral embracing me, the yelling reminds me of wanting out of something or somewhere. The sound is creepy, haunting and is one of my favorites. "Hurt" is deep, the it's got a sad, tumultous sound like "The Downward Spiral," the mood in this song is first sorrow, then when the heavy guitaring shows up, it expresses both anger and depression. The last riff probably represents that person killing himself and like in movies, fades out still showing his or her body hang. All in all, I love the sound, it's tumultous, sad, angry and I recommend this album to those who are in serious pain, don't get any wrong ideas but yeah. // 10

Lyrics: I read the lyrics, his artistic way in writing sounds a bit like improv only from the heart and soul, take "I Do Not Want This," for example, if you listen closely, it sounds a bit like an improv that's been rehearsed only twice. Trent is a good songwriter and I envy him, he's one of my influences and I wish I can make music similar as his. // 10

Overall Impression: The songs I'm impressed with are probably "Mr. Self Destruct" (because of the ending), "The Downward Spiral" (for it's mood, heavily emotional), and "Hurt" (the conclusion of this album). What I love about this album is I can relate to a little bit of it, the sorrow, the anger and the "suicide" at the end of this CD. If it were stolen or lost, I wouldn't really worry about it because I know it's replacable, it's worth the money! // 10

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overall: 9.3
The Downward Spiral Reviewed by: skellyscribbles, on may 21, 2008
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: Its rare to find an album so diverse, touching so many corners of dynamics and timbres, that every song conjures up a feeling or memory. Downward Spiral achieves this, which makes it so appealing. The textures in downward spiral never cease to enchant and engage me. The soft "chss" sound at the start of eraser, for example, reminds me of blowing air through a straw; the machine loop of ruiner, being true to the name Industrial. On no album have I heard so many layers that every time I listen I find something new in the frey. // 10

Lyrics: One of Trents strengths and weaknesses: His lyrics can sometimes being cringe-worthy and overbearing, and sometimes so brutal and true that it reaches out and tells you something you've been thinking all along. Lyrics-wise, this is Nine Inch nails greatest album, in particular Hurt, which makes me shudder with his soft, then grating singing. Vocals on this album, as usual, are a particularly strong, as they fit perfectly with the sound. "I do not want this" is my favourite song, with a warning repetition of the title, then and blast of defiance, "don't you tell me how I feel!". // 8

Overall Impression: 4x platinum, no. 2 only billboard 100, cover by Jonny Cash and more "top 100 albums" lists than you could possibly count. There's a reason for all this. This is definately one of my favourite albums of all time, so varied yet united by a feeling of being so alone. In the year 2408 this will be considered 20th century Mozart. // 10

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