With Teeth Review

artist: nine inch nails date: 11/21/2006 category: compact discs
nine inch nails: With Teeth
Released: May 3, 2005
Genre: Rock
Styles: Alternative Metal, Industrial Metal
Number Of Tracks: 13
More than 15 years after his debut, Reznor is as tormented as ever, and Nine Inch Nails fans wouldn't have it any other way.
 Sound: 8.4
 Lyrics: 7.7
 Overall Impression: 8.4
 Overall rating:
 8.6 
 Reviewer rating:
 8.2 
 Users rating:
 8.9 
 Votes:
 79 
reviews (34) 16 comments vote for this album:
overall: 7.3
With Teeth Reviewed by: lovehatetrgdy06, on july 06, 2005
4 of 4 people found this review helpful

Sound: With Teeth comes in with a more up-beat, rock band-like sound that hadn't been heard since the release of "Broken" in 1992. The album features a heavier doasage of the basic rock instruments (guitar, bass) then previously heard over the last ten years of Nine Inch Nails' work. // 8

Lyrics: The centers around a more independent, uprising theme seen in "The Hand That Feeds" and "Only." Coincidentally these songs happen to be the first two singles off the album. Many can connect it to the war on terror currently happening in the Middle East. Nine Inch Nails' frontman Trent Reznor focuses on a more relaxed, melodic approach to the new album then previous records. Past work shows the depressed and even disturbed mental state of Reznor in songs like, "Heresy" and "Hurt." The singer shows that he is capable of being a melodic and talented artist as well as the hardened human he has become. // 8

Overall Impression: The album itself was good. When I first picked up the album, I had not heard any of Nine Inch Nails' previous work. I thought the album was great, and then went out and got more and more of Nine Inch Nails' albums. However the more I bought, the more I disliked "With Teeth." After albums like, "The Downward Spiral" and "The Fragile," "With Teeth" doesn't really compare to the older style of Nine Inch Nails. The agony and depression in previous albums set the tone for who Nine Inch Nails was in the music world, and "With Teeth" strays from that so much that I feel they have lost their edge. The lyrics and messages just don't seem to contain as much power and meaning as they do in more of the heartfelt and emotional albums. I still suggest getting the album, if you are a Nine Inch Nails fan or not. It's still a nice album to add to anyone's collection. // 6

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overall: 9.3
With Teeth Reviewed by: wallyyfm, on april 30, 2005
2 of 2 people found this review helpful

Sound: I got an advance on this, my local record place got it on the 28th, it wasn't due out till may 3rd. Well, I'm rather pleased with the album. I fell in love with The Fragile, but as Trent stated earlier, this is more of a song orientated album than instrumental. There are some good beats, great piano, not much guitar this time though. No really super heavy songs like The Fragile either, but none the less, there are some very cool tracks. // 8

Lyrics: Do we really need to talk about his lyrics? The man has written the deepest, scarriest stuff, the lyrics in this album seem to be lighter though. // 10

Overall Impression: I'm happy with it. When I first heard the new single, I wasn't thrilled cause it sounded like pop. But that track flows amazingly well with the rest of the album. The album as a whole is a keeper, and I will be listening to it for the next month or so. // 10

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overall: 10
With Teeth Reviewed by: unregistered, on may 09, 2005
2 of 2 people found this review helpful

Sound: With Teeth is a progression (as it should be) from the lush soundscapes evident throughout The Fragile or the harsh mechanical grindings present on The Downward Spiral. It is a new direction with a fantastic new sound, yet it is easy to pick out pieces influenced by earlier NIN recordings. A variety of familiar sounds are used from Pretty Hate Machine (The Hand That Feeds, Only), The Downward Spiral (The Collector, Every Day Is Exactly The Same, Sunspots), and The Fragile era (The Line Begins To Blur, Right Where It Belongs). As with all subsequent albums, there has been new sounds and manipulated old sounds. Reznor insists there was a minimilist mindset during the recording of With Teeth, but even when he isn't pulling every new trick out of his sleeve, the production on a Nine Inch Nails album is miles above that of your average record in 2005. // 10

Lyrics: First of all, Trent shows vocal range on With Teeth that he has never come near before. He sounds fantastic here. As for the lyrics themselves, sadly, I've seen many reviews that come off with a feel that Trent has really lost touch with the writer he was in 1994. They couldn't be more wrong. In this day and age of internet anonymity, we are presented with hipster reviewers that are too cool to believe that an artist like Trent Reznor has progressed in his songwriting, and no longer feels all the anger that he once did. Take a song like "You Know What You Are?" Reviewers are saying things like "Reznor is just about to turn 40-years-old and he is still whining and hates the world, and we see this when he uses lyrics like: "You can't change anything/don't you f--king know what you are?" When unfortunately these reviewers are too worried about looking cool to their peers, so they write them off as angry, adolescent lyrics. It doesn't take a rocket scientist to see that when Reznor screams "don't you fucking know what you are?" that he is only looking in the mirror and questioning himself. Another example, is "Only." Reznor is oh-so-angry at the world because he said "there is no you, there is only me." They write him off as being self-centered. Once again, the "you" theme that is present on With Teeth is only Reznor talking about his old self. It truly upsets me that With Teeth is one of the most inspiring and uplifting lyrical works of our generation, and many of this hipsters will never see that. They choose not to view Reznor's lyrics as a self commentary because it is too challenging. There couldn't possibly be a way that people lie to themselves or fake their own lives. That would just be too devastating. Why look deeper for the truth, when you could just sweep it under the rug, right? Unfortunate. Many reviewers also seem to carry the opinion that once you turn 30-years-old, you're not allowed to get angry anymore. You're not a teenager so the world is a wonderful place and if you happen to let out a scream or complaint. Well, you're just acting juvenile. Give me a break. Reznor gets full marks on lyrics because he is honest enough with himself to speak the truth and say what others are afraid to admit. He may be content with himself now that he's cleaned up, but, like anyone who has achieved victory and overcame something, they went through struggles. Thank you for writing truly honest lyrics, Trent. // 10

Overall Impression: With Teeth is as good as any Nine Inch Nails album before it. His songwriting seems more in tune with the innocence and vulnurability on Pretty Hate Machine, while the sound itself borrows from every era. The music may be easier to grasp this time around, "accessable" if you will, but that hardly means that the overall appeal will wear off quickly. Over time, when people have had some time to really sit down and think about the words and themes present on With Teeth, it will hopefully be appreciated for the beautiful work of art that it is. // 10

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overall: 7.7
With Teeth Reviewed by: A-Thousand-Lies, on november 21, 2006
2 of 2 people found this review helpful

Sound: For the year leading up to With Teeth, I was whipped into a NIN frenzy. If Trent Reznor was spotted at the supermarket, I would read about it somewhere. As one can imagine, my expectations were tremendous. And, to my fortune, they were indeed met. With Teeth is a solid and diverse follow-up to the experimental Fragile of '99. The album has something for everyone: good old industrial metal (You Know What You Are?), nod-your-head rock (The Hand That Feeds, Getting Smaller), cheesy yet awesome 80s synth rock (Only), and even a vaccuum cleaner on the seductive Sunspots. The instrumentation is solid as well, as usual, Trent write songs that can create a mood and impress the listener without needing to use decadent guitar solos or extended or guttural screaming. Here's a track-by-track rundown: 01. All The Love In The World - an experimental, groovy drum 'n' bass track. A very unique and, some might say, risky way to start the album. However, it delivers, with an impressive crescendo and an interesting use of gospel-like singing. 02. You Know What You Are? - the first word that comes to mind is "Broken" (or maybe "Ministry" for you big industrial fans). Trent's able to deliver brooding rock with the inclusion of spooky synths and drums that punch you in the face straight away. Juxtaposes nicely with All The Love In The World. 03. The Collector - the most disappointing track on the album. The lyrics are somewhat weak, and there's not much else appealing; no real hook, no catchy bridge. Just some mediocre synths and low vocals towards the end. 04. The Hand That Feeds - the radio-friendly leadoff single, that actually has some credibility. This song shows the real maturation of Trent's lyical skills, and his ability to focus on topics other than himself. Of course, everyone's done the bush bash before, but on this track, it's done with style and integrity. And who could forget that awesome synth solo? 05. Love Is Not Enough - once more, we see some nice juxtaposition between the rockin' Hand That Feeds, and this; a brooding, angry track, that echoes "lost lover". Droning guitars, creepy goth-y bass and some decent lyrics. A solid track. Not single material, but certainly good. 06. Every Day Is Exactly The Same - another solid track. It has a weird, semi-industrial feel to it; could've very easily been on The Fragile. The lyrics are a bit weak, but it's something that's he's never done before, and it delivers. 07. With Teeth - this is the track that I consider to be the end of the first half of With Teeth. Those of you with who are slightly perverse may be reminded of fellatio by the lyrics, but the subject matter reflects Love Is Not Enough. Some really unusual guitar effects, and a nice juxtaposition of pretty piano, followed by an abrupt burst of every other instrument. "Ah-with-ah teeth-ah!" 08. Only - this is by far the standout track on the album. Many of the more-than-casual NIN fans will see a lot of similarities between this track and Down In It (they even both mention thie "tiny little dot"), but this certainly wasn't a Skinny Puppy rip-off. A funky bassline, catchy lyrics and a killer chorus. This song screams of the '80s. 09. Getting Smaller - it's difficult to follow up a track like Only, but Getting Smaller does it well. It's the real punch in the face that we were promised, with a vicious riff. Very punk-y indeed. 10. The Line Begins To Blur - this is where things really do begin to blur. There's a little too much distortion here, I feel sorry for whoever tries to tab it out. It's alright, it's nothing special. 11. Beside You In Time - this track can get very annoying, depending on your mood. Hell, even if you're the happiest person alive, it can still sound like a broken record. But once that crescendo kicks in, and we hear the guitars, the song really picks up. A nice way to lead in to the mandatory ballad of the album. 12. Right Where It Belongs - Hurt, meet your companion. I still can't decide if this matches up to the Downward Spiral closer, but it still is a brilliant piece. Once again, the crescendo is where things really pick up, and no matter what, this song can bring a tear to your eye. One of the most beautiful piano riffs I've ever heard. 13. Home - this track is only on some versions; the Australian, Japanese and vinyl ones, I believe. Interesting use of brass, which is something we haven't seen for a while (I can only think of Purest Feeling, but I doubt anyone wants to remember that). This song sounds sort of empty, but in a good way. It's hard to describe, so I'll just say that it's good. // 8

Lyrics: Trent's lyrical skills have never really been that fantastic in comparison to the other big groups of alternative rock. On With Teeth, we see a bit of juxtaposition; we have the lyrical maturity and intelligence of The Hand That Feeds, which one can both sing along to without feeling stupid. Conversely, we have some lyrics that are just plain stupid: "I pick things up/I am a collector", "Sunspots cast a glare in my eye/Sometimes I forget I'm alive". It's certainly a mixed batch. But of course, as we know, Trent has gone sober, and he's beating his demons, so I guess we can't really expect the same sincerity and originality on previous albums. As a vocalist, Trent's still as good as ever. There's certainly a lot of diversity; the quiet melancholy of All The Love In The World, which builds up into an gospel-like crescendo. You Know What You Are? and Getting Smaller display the angry Trent we all know and love from the days of Broken and The Downward Spiral. The vocals are indeed up to standard, but it can be difficult to appreciate them when the accompanying lyrics leave so much more to be desired. // 7

Overall Impression: No NIN album will ever be able to match The Downward Spiral. There'll never be another Ruiner, nor another Becoming. With Teeth delivers; it's a good, solid album, but one can't help but wonder if Bleedthrough would've been any better, had the ideas not been scrapped. I'm still waiting for My Dead Friend (unless that track was turned into something else). Only is of course the standout track, but the poor lyrics present throughout the album really bring it down. As far as diversity is concerned, this album is a masterpiece, but unfortauntely, it still leaves a bit to be desired. // 8

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overall: 9.3
With Teeth Reviewed by: unregistered, on may 09, 2005
1 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sound: With Teeth can best be described as a fusion of every previous NIN release into one hard hitting record. It has everything from intense synth driven tracks like 'Only' to heavily the distorted guitar driven song 'You Know What You Are?' to soft piano focused songs that bring us into the 'Fragile' state. This album maintains the complex layering that all Nine Inch Nails releases contain. Upon repeated listenings you continue to hear and notice subtle sounds and noises that you did not notice before. The addition of the 5.1 audio disc is a definate highlight, and just like 'The Downward Spiral: Deluxe Edition' this album really lends itself to the surround capabilities. If you have not purchased the 5.1 surround disc, you are missing a lot. But at least listen to the album on great speakers or with headphones if you just have the regular disc. // 10

Lyrics: Reznor has certainly been working on his vocal skills a lot and it shows. He demonstrates his advanced vocals right in the opening track 'All The Love In The World' where his voice is soft and melodic to abbrasive and discordant. As the lyrics, there is not a whole lot new here in terms of lyrical content. His writing style is very similar to all his other albums, but it is about a different set of problems. This album is about problems with his manager and his alcohol enslavement. // 8

Overall Impression: With Teeth is an album that requires more than one listen, and a close look at the lyrics and understanding of what is/was going on in the life of Reznor. On my first listen I was impressed, but somewhat disappointed at the same time. The main problem, this album hadn't generated that longing that 'The Fragile' had generated. 'The Fragile' was such a long time in the making, there were so many rumours about what it was going to sound like and when it would be released. And yet it was all unsubstantiated. Reznor himself never really said anything about the album, and just huddled away tinkering relentlessly to create it. When it was released I bought it up and listened to it and was absolutly in awe. It was worth the wait. It was a surprising turn in the direction NIN had been going, and it was a turn I was ready for. With Teeth didn't generate this kind of hype, it did generate hype, but not with the same necessity that 'The Fragile' did. I went into the record half expecting not to like it, and on my first listen I almost convinced myself. But Trent Reznor does not fail. And despite my hardest efforts, I could not stay away from this album, and the more I listen to it, the more I love it. It is not as passionate or delicate an album as 'The Fragile. ' It is a culmination of everything that Nine Inch Nails has ever been. It has been mixed, sampled, and kicked in the balls repeatedly, and come out sounding as good as anything Reznor has ever one. If you are a fan of Nine Inch Nails, you will love this. If you are a fan of music, you will love this. If you simply are, you will love this. // 10

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overall: 3.3
With Teeth Reviewed by: unregistered, on may 09, 2005
1 of 4 people found this review helpful

Sound: "With Teeth" is by far the most dense NIN record, and also the most cluttered sounding. The majority of the songs are muddy sounding with each instrument appearing to have not been mixed but merely all turned to the same level. There is little to no clarity on the record, with the exception of the records standout song "Everyday Is Exactly The Same." // 4

Lyrics: Trent Reznor has never been a poet, but the majority of the lyrics here range from cringe inducing to laugh worthy. For a man that's thrity eight years old to sound like he wasn't picked for kickball in gym (again) isn't really cool or hip but just stupid. Reznor once avoids the "I was screwed over, someone harmed me, now I'm angry" with "Right Where It Belongs," but by that point it's to little to late and my head hurt from the sub-junior high school creative writting class poetry assignment lyrics that make up the bulk of the record. // 2

Overall Impression: This is the first time that a NIN record has let me down, but what an immense dissapointment it is. There is little to grab onto while the songs are playing, and by the time it had finally concluded I remembered very little (even less good things) about the record as a whole. The sound is muddy and way to busy, the lyrics borded line (or just flat out) moronic and the songs are unmemorable and trite mid-ninties industrial pop a la Stabbing Westward. My copy of "With Teeth" will very, very quickly join the rest of the CDs at my local used CD store. Worst NIN record yet. // 4

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overall: 4.3
With Teeth Reviewed by: unregistered, on may 09, 2005
1 of 3 people found this review helpful

Sound: Musically it's somewhere between The Downward Spiral & The Fragile. I think theres a little bit of Telfon Tel Aviv slipping in on track 1 too. Must say I enjoy the music (even "Only"). // 10

Lyrics: I feel slightly I'll reading these lyrics. I've been a fan for many many years (since broken really), but I feel mr. Reznor's lyrics are getting worse with each album. Some of the content is borderline embarassing, and the spoken word parts just do not work. Sorry, but this album would have been 10 times better if it was instrumental. // 2

Overall Impression: He'll never beat the downward spiral. Musically this is great, lyrically this is a car crash. I don't know if I would have preffered a medium ground tho, because the music would suffer. But then I don't think Trent's lyrics have ever been that astounding. Shakespear he ain't. // 1

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overall: 8
With Teeth Reviewed by: unregistered, on may 03, 2005
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: The overall sonic feel of With Teeth is very dynamic and covers a full spectrum of moods and feelings. Songs like Beside You In Time fit into Reznor's trademark "Is it real guitar or synth?" sound. If you like a balance of fast live drums and packaged machine-beats, with a good portion of slow piano medleys, this album is up your alley. // 8

Lyrics: Dark and brooding lyrics as usual. Lyrics tend to focus on the listener's life versus the songwriter's life. // 8

Overall Impression: I can see a step forward from NIN's previous albums, especially The Fragile and Still. If you're looking for another The Downward Spiral, you'll only like a couple songs. I suggest buying the DVD-Audio format, because Reznor is one of the best producers of recorded music, plus there's viewable artwork contained on the DVD. // 8

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overall: 8.7
With Teeth Reviewed by: jesseyoza, on may 06, 2005
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: The soundscape on With Teeth was not as broad as on The Fragile or The Downward Spiral, their are not as many great beats either because trent just recorded a drum set instead of programing the beats as on the previous albums. Key tracks are: 13. Right Where It Belongs, 4. The Hand That Feeds and 1. All The Love In The World. These songs caught my ear even though I tend to like the darker side of NIN which you hardly find on With Teeth. // 8

Lyrics: The lyrics are clever and thoughtful just as you would expect from a great artist like trent. // 10

Overall Impression: Of course I am only on my seventh listen and I still have alot to discover on this CD but I am not as thrilled with this almbum as I am with Pretty Hate Machine and Downward Spiral. On the up side I would say that With Teeth is a little better that broken. // 8

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overall: 10
With Teeth Reviewed by: unregistered, on may 07, 2005
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: Another classic Nine Inch Nails album. The sound is some what different than the past albums. This ones more song oriented, and it is amazing. Every song draws you in; I've had songs stuck in my head since the day it came out. I can't skip a song on the whole CD. // 10

Lyrics: Trent's lyrics are still amazing, and his voice sounds just as good or better than the past. The songs and choruses in them are very catchy, yet every Nine Inch Nails fan will love them. // 10

Overall Impression: In my overall impression, this is probably in my top 5 cds that I own. Along with The Fragile and The Downward Spiral, I'd almost say this album is better than them. I really don't have a favorite song because I love them all, except I've listened to Everyday Is The Same, Beside You In Time, and Right Where It Belongs a lot. This CD will be known as a classic just as the past two. // 10

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overall: 10
With Teeth Reviewed by: unregistered, on may 07, 2005
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: The sound is what you expect from Trent Reznor. Although it is a step down from the Fragile in terms of being an instrumental-festa and nowhere near the harsh, dark side of The Downward Spiral, With Teeth still makes for a great listen. More keyboards this time around. Not that much anger. The hardest you get is the second track, You Know What You Are? // 10

Lyrics: No brainer. Tends to use 'the line begins to blur' alot. Nice to see 'Nothing can stop me now' in Sunspots. // 10

Overall Impression: I must say that the last half of With Teeth owns the first half, but the whole thing is really good. The last three songs are well linked and in my opinion, are the three best overall. Wouldn't go as far to say it's better than The Fragile, I will say that it is a good one. Hard to rate how it compares to previous NIN cds, because they are all very good and they all come across a different phase in Reznor's life. Where PHM was about growing up and women, and Broken is strictly anger towards the world and TVT, WT focuses on a political theme, along with all the other NIN topics! Probably the most addictive NIN album to listen to, seriously. // 10

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overall: 8
With Teeth Reviewed by: unregistered, on may 07, 2005
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: With Teeth tends to break away from the heavy scrapes and mechanical noises of previous albums such as "Broken" and "The Downward Spiral." Yet is not all that similar to the light instrumental and string cortet sound of it's predecessor "The Fragile." The album seems to take on a whole new sound of it's own with it's light drum beats and moderate guitar riffs. While a long-time listener of Nine Inch Nails may find songs such as "All The Love In The World" and "Only" to be quite different than what they're used to. Songs such as "Right Where It Belongs" seem to resemble the tone and feeling of previous songs like "Hurt." But with it's mix of new and different (yet familiar) sounds, With Teeth seems to be able to hold it's own. // 8

Lyrics: Most of the lyrics are somewhat low and dark in contrast to the upbeat sound of the music that accompanies them. Where as lyrics to songs like "You Know What You Are?" fit quite well with their heavy aggressive riffs. // 8

Overall Impression: As every NIN album tends to be different than the one that came before it, "With Teeth" is no exception. Reznor continued to make an album that fit his creative urges at that point in time. While "With Teeth" may not be a masterpiece at first listen, it does tend to grow on you. "Right Where It Belongs" might be one of the songs that gets absorbed quicker, but sure enough other songs like "Everyday Is Exactly The Same" will soon hold a place in your heart as well. // 8

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overall: 10
With Teeth Reviewed by: unregistered, on may 09, 2005
0 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sound: With Teeth definately isn't as dark as previous NIN albums but it is really nice to listen to. I was shocked at how light it was but I found myself liking some of the softer songs like "Right Where It Belongs" I can't really say its better than Trent's previous albums but it is a great listen. // 10

Lyrics: The lyrics overall are what to expect from Trent Reznor. His voice is as amazing as ever and sounds great with the dark side of the lyrics. // 10

Overall Impression: Chances are if you are a NIN fan you will enjoy this CD very much. One of the major things I like about this album is you wont find yourself attached to one song you can enjoy all the songs on the album, although I would have to say that "The Hand That Feeds," "The Line Begins To Blur" and "Right Where It Belongs" are some of my favorite songs. With Teeth definately sucks you in. It isn't quite the same as Trent's other albums but it is still worth while. If I happened to lose this album I would absolutely have to buy it again. // 10

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overall: 10
With Teeth Reviewed by: unregistered, on may 09, 2005
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: First off, the sound is addicting. The albums sound is very dark, as usual comming from Trent. The drums sound real on the record, not from a sampler, which makes it harder. Some really cool riffs on the record, like in 'Only' and 'Love Isn't Enough.' The sound is different from NIN records, but it's still in the ballpark to tell that it's Trent Reznor's music. // 10

Lyrics: Are you kidding? Lyrics are written by a lyrical genious. Trent is a god when it comes to lyrics. "Yes I'm alone, but then again I always was, as far back as I can tell, I think maybe its because, because you were never real to begin with, I just made you up to hurt myself, and it worked, yes it did!" // 10

Overall Impression: The album is awsome. You can't compare it to TDS or PHM because its a different vibe, but its still awsome. One of the best NIN records ever. Trent sings about how he got f--ked up in the past, and how he lost it all, and how he is doing now. Best songs - "Don't You Know What You Are," "Only," "Love Isn't Enough," "Everyday Is Exactly The Same" and "With Teeth." I'll be listing to it for a long time. // 10

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overall: 7.3
With Teeth Reviewed by: unregistered, on may 09, 2005
0 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sound: The extensive use of live drums gives the album a very nice unified feel. While guitars and synths may change, the drums remain a constant. There are fewer layers and a greatly reduced density to the songs, but the elements that remain form a stripped-down and focused core devoid of clutter. Guitar tones, rhythms, basslines, and melodies are unmistakably Nine Inch Nails, but there is lacking a certain freshness. // 8

Lyrics: The lyrics seem honest, forceful, and delivered within a focused state of mind. However, the content of the lyrics and the messages are tired and repetitive. You would expect to see these coming from an angst-filled troubled youth, not a more mature human being. // 6

Overall Impression: Refreshing, in a sense, as a follow-up to The Fragile. It is a return to the songcrafting that made Nine Inch Nails as popular as it is. However, the disappointingly re-hashed lyrical themes take much from this album. There are many fans of Trent Reznor that have since moved on because they have matured and outgrown the simplistic and adolescent lyrical style. This album does not really call to them. // 8

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overall: 4.7
With Teeth Reviewed by: unregistered, on may 09, 2005
0 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sound: With Teeth finds Trent Reznor exploring musical landscapes never before explored by the dark prince of industrial goth. Excited? Don't be. These landscapes turn out to be the last ones you'd expect to hear Reznor traverse. Nine Inch Nails is back from a 5 years hiatus and ready to rock you, radio friendly style. Easily the most accessible NIN album to date, it plays as if it's eager to win over a new crowd. One imagines this is because NIN mastermind and creator Trent Reznor probably believes his hardcore fans of the past have grown up and moved on from his angst ridden spiral of destruction, and so it's time to find some new ones. Gone are the pounding, thunderous drum machines, urgent guitar scrapings, and other worldly random noises that made Nine Inch Nails so special. Enter the pop musings and straight forward approach of the newly sober Trent Reznor. Goodbye Nine Inch Nails. Hello Three Inch Thumbtacks. Which sounds safer? In fairness, there are tracks that seem as if they're trying to find the roar of the past, such "Don't you know what you are?" But none actually hit the full crescendo of fury that the songs that came before them achieved effortlessly. // 6

Lyrics: Lyrically the album is a bit of a bust. Profanity seems thrown in for the sake of still sounding edgy, and is often complimented by a random effect to make it really stand out, just to ensure the Parental Advisory sticker is added. Who would buy a Nine Inch Nils album without one? On the flip side, songs such as lead-off track "All The Love In The World" sound like Trent dug up his gradeschool poetry musings and dusted them off. Although I suppose swearing for the sake of sounding hip is rather gradeschool as well, even if you are pushing middle age. All in all, nothing that wil linspire you here lyrically like Nine Inch Nails albums of the past. // 4

Overall Impression: Overall, the album seems best summed up by the prophetical lyrics of the track Only, in which Trent confesses "I'm becoming less to find as days go by/Fading away/Well you might say/I'm losing focus/Kind adrifting into the abstract in terms of how I see myself. You're not the only one that sees it Trent. // 4

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overall: 9.3
With Teeth Reviewed by: unregistered, on may 09, 2005
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Sound: The sound as usual, with NIN is unbeleivable. The album really really takes on a new feel with the addition of live drums. This sound in a sense is really a departure from his older work and moving more in to realm of the CD Still. // 10

Lyrics: The lyrics are trademark Trent Reznor. His lyrics always will be a inspiration for millions of people. There seems to be a lot more melodies in the songs, which compliants his voice. // 8

Overall Impression: In comparison with the other albums I think it's right up there. It is very tough to make comparisons with the Downward Spiral, Pretty Hate Machine, Broken, or The Fragile. This albums has a little of all the albums in there. The most impresive songs on the album are: All The Love In The World, Love Is Not Enough, Everyday Is Exactly The Same, And Right Were It Belongs. // 10

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overall: 9.3
With Teeth Reviewed by: unregistered, on may 09, 2005
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Sound: Trent Reznor is notable for, among other things, making the keyboard a sexy and powerful instrument. This album features a much more stripped down approach to music production, and, in that vein, is similar sounding to Pretty Hate Machine. But With Teeth is much more advanced than Pretty Hate Machine; he uses all the experience he's gained in the past fifteen years to inform a much more minimal record, and the results are fabulous. He's discovered that he can write solid songs without layering hundreds of tracks on top of each other. That being said, there are still many trademark NIN sounds present here, with lots of noisy percussion and grating synths, though the synths are generally not as gussied up as on previous records. The first thing that springs to mind as I listened to the album was how funky it is, and how beat oriented it is. Harmonically it's a very simple album (the verse in The Line Begins to Blur, for example, consists of one note played over and over), but rhythmically it's as ambitious as anything Reznor's done in the past. The Collector, for example, has a 6/8 verse with an extra beat kicked in every other bar, while the chorus alternates between 4/4 and 6/8. This may sound too complicated for pop, but Reznor knows what he's doing, and by putting the album's most straight-forward song, The Hand That Feeds, after The Collector, he provides relief for those who may have found the bizarre rhythms disorienting. The effect of this is that The Collector ends up sounding mroe unique and The Hand That Feeds sounds less frivolous. A similar transition occurs between With Teeth and Only, and the flow of the album as a whole is similarly very well thought out. And, in describing the sound of the album, I would be remiss if I didn't mention my favorite track on the album, Beside You In Time. The song sweats anticipation, the melodious vocals playing juicily against the dissonances in the synthesizer. When the vocals and the drums drop out, leaving only the numbingly wide synth, it leaves me feeling like I'm floating in space, blinded by something beautiful. When the end section finally arrives, we are treated to a beautiful serenade from Reznor, pulling all the strings on the heart. This is one of the best Nine Inch Nails songs you've ever heard. // 10

Lyrics: I've only had time to listen to the album 15 or so times since its release, and haven't really gotten to listen to closely to the lyrics or look for common threads. Reznor's voice has certainly improved, or, at least, the scope of things he's willing to do with his voice has broadened. As always, the lyrics, like the music, are simple in small parts, but the whole begins to say something profound. The lyrics to the last song, Right Where It Belongs, are new territory for Nine Inch Nails, perhaps aided by Reznor's experience in Alcoholics Anonymous; they seem to take something from group therapy. As always the lyrics are impassioned enough to make you feel a strong connection, but vague enough for the songs to apply to a broad range of things. There's also some self-referential stuff, such as the Down In It reference in Only (which will annihilate the airwaves this summer). // 8

Overall Impression: In an era when high school kids seem to have a greater appreciation for rock and punk music of the seventies and eighties, perhaps this album falls into the zeitgeist, recalling, with its heavy use of monophonic analog synthesizers, early electronic pop. The soon-to-be-single, Only, takes the best of Michael Jackson and Prince and gives it that signature Nine Inch Nails sound. This is a vibrant album, pulsing with more energy than any other Nine Inch Nails record. If you hop on for the ride, it'll swing you around at a thousand miles an hour. Whatever else this album is, it's a thrilling statement of vitality from a man who hasn't made a record in 5 years. Call me stupid, but when he says there'll be another album soon, I actually believe him. Also, be sure to check out the artwork available online. Truly an ingenious step in album presentation. // 10

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overall: 10
With Teeth Reviewed by: unregistered, on may 09, 2005
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Sound: NIN still creates one of the more original sounds in the mainstream of music today. This album contains everything from guitars, Dave Grohl on drums, synths, piano, tambourine, to Reznor recreating himself with a different and fresh style of singing. Reznor creates a dark opus that confronts and sometimes jokes about his past drug addiction. It sounds glum at times, but there is a continuous optimism throughout it all. // 10

Lyrics: With Teeth has more lyrics than most of the previous NIN releases. They aren't hidden behind a wall of noise anymore this time around either, due to Reznor's new confidence in himself. The lyrics convey deep and inspirational lyrics. // 10

Overall Impression: You definitely can't run out and explain this album to friends by comparing this to other artists besides NIN. Even that can be a little difficult with the originality that this brings forth. I would say that the highlights for me are "Every Day Is Exactly The Same," "Only," "Sunspots," and "Right Where It Belongs," but I love every song. I bought two copies of this cd, so I can enjoy the high quality of surround sound and have a regular version for every day listening, to prevent damage to the dual disc. // 10

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overall: 8.7
With Teeth Reviewed by: unregistered, on may 09, 2005
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Sound: The sound this time around is more streamlined and less 'wall of sound', like The Fragile. Not to say there are no distorted guitars, lush sonic landscapes on this album, because there are. It just seems that the focus of With Teeth is strictly the songs themselves, and not the actual daunting task of sitting through the excruciating beauty, which was The Fragile. With Teeth is a strong listen the first time through, and it only grows stronger with each additional listen. You will definately have this CD on repeat play, as it's seems to end too quickly. And you'll also think of it as yet another masterpiece from Trent Reznor. // 8

Lyrics: The lyrics on With Teeth are like any other album from NIN. Disconnnnected, angry, sad and focused inward. Trent Reznor's voice has never sounded better. // 8

Overall Impression: Comparing one NIN album with another is always tough for me. While The Fragile is probably my most listened to and loved NIN album, I can see where some thought it was too long and self indulgent. I'll just say With Teeth is almost as if Trent went back, took bits and pieces from Pretty Hate Machine, The Downward Spiral and The Fragile, mixed them up in a blender, streamlined each song and made it something seemingly familiar, but quite different. There hints of nostalgia peppered through out the album, yet each song sounds refreshingly new. Having said that, I tend to miss the long spiraling songs that fed into instrumentals, as in The Fragile. I miss the grand scope of both Downward and Fragile. But With Teeth is an instant classic which deserves to be in NIN fans, and non-fans librarys alike. Yet another Nine Inch Nails classic album. // 10

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overall: 8.7
With Teeth Reviewed by: unregistered, on may 09, 2005
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Sound: NIN's 'With Teeth' is a collage of almost every style of music and accomplishes this very well. The songs blend and interconnect and makes sitting down and listening to the album in its entirety a must. Reznor still has his heavy, hard tracks like "You Know What You Are?" and "Getting Smaller," but also has very subtle, melodic, even funky tracks like "All The Love In The World," "Only," and "Sunspots." I won't go as far as to say this is a musical masterpice, but the mood and feel of the album is the best I've heard in, well, 5 1/2 years). // 10

Lyrics: Lyrically, typical Reznor. There are lines from previous songs, but it seems like he is making fun of himself rather than recycling them. The spoken wordy "Only" made me really think of Bowie or 'Talking Heads', but then, whats wrong with that? Trent does really seem to sing a lot of the songs rather than just scream them which is a nice change. // 8

Overall Impression: Overall, "With Teeth" is a fantasic record and if you are NIN fan, it may take several listenings to really get it and appreciate it (it did for me). The album has a different feel than the rest of Reznor's work, yet it seems as though it belongs among them. The wait was worth it. One thing I will admit: I haven't been able to stop listening to it yet! // 8

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overall: 9.3
With Teeth Reviewed by: unregistered, on may 09, 2005
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Sound: I was instantly struck with how mature a sound Reznor had developed in this album. The increased use of live sounding drumming and more band orientated songs, combined with subtle use of synths and effects, makes for a breath of fresh air that still contains that unmistakable whiff of NIN. The variety in this album impresses, with a near perfect balance of textures throughout. // 10

Lyrics: Reznor's lyrical style is as agnst ridden as ever. While he has gone for a more political direction in this album, the subjects are still deeply personal and engaging. As ever, Reznor often seems to use one too many ryhming couplets, and occasionaly the lyrics can sound like a bit of a cliche (albeit, one which Reznor established himself). // 8

Overall Impression: This is definately a superb album. Accessible enough for the majority of consumers, but with sufficient depth to please those who loved The Fragile. Contaning some instant classics such as Right Where it Belongs (as well as some not-so-good songs, e.g. The Collector), Reznor should be proud of what he has done, and anyone who buys the album is in for a treat. // 10

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overall: 8.7
With Teeth Reviewed by: unregistered, on may 09, 2005
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Sound: Every album and ep until the fragile has been a major difference in sound. With Teeth combines all the previous works into a new re-worked sound type. Some production techniques and effects from the fragile are clearly in the sound spectrum. He completely recorded differently, he used to say and use a different drum sound on every song. Now the album has the same live drum sound on many songs (mostly the dave grohl drumming) but without getting bored with it. It is a great live drum sound, nicely compressed. This is more stripped down in layers but I do think it is sometimes too full of information for being stripped. // 10

Lyrics: Too full of information is what I also think of the lyrics. Maybe it's because in interviews he mainly tells the topics so the lyrics stay 1 dimensional to me (they don't go any deeper/abstract or give the listener a question mark so they can fill it in about what it is). Some lyric usage do surprise me (flip-flop-flip flop). Unlike some journalists I do find it excellent that he stays personal in his own world. Too much bad worlds on the news and I'm all for Individuals instead of groupings! Be yourself. There's no you there is only me. // 8

Overall Impression: With these songs I could give this a 5: All The Love In The World, You Know What You Are?, The Collector, The Hand That Feeds, Every Day Is Exactly The Same, Only, bEside You In Time, Right Where It Belongs. These are good also but didn't gave me such an impact: The collector, the line begins to blur, Home. The other 4 skip on many listens (love is not enough, with teeth, getting smaller, sunspots). Compaired to other albums on the market this album features a 10 out of 14 excellent song listens. which is way more than an average of 2 out of 14. In the future With Teeth will be mentioned next to the "Downward Spiral" and "Pretty Hate Machine." Best songs: All The Love In The World, Every Day Is Exactly The Same, Right Where It Belongs, Only. // 8

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overall: 10
With Teeth Reviewed by: unregistered, on may 10, 2005
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Sound: Just popping it into the cd player "All The Love In The World" hit me like a truck. Brilliantly personal as always but more direct. The smoother, friendlier sounds may have turned some people off but only those without a decent ear for music. The sounds are nothing but what Trent could make. // 10

Lyrics: As usual, excellent vocal talent. Always this experimentalist Trent tries new things but makes them his own. Beautiful lyrics for an amazing CD. // 10

Overall Impression: In the 5 years between The Fragile and With Teeth I scavenged around and tried to find enough NIN to keep me busy. It was worth the wait but it was everything I could have hoped for. It has done nothing but increase my thirst for more NIN. May god be kind and the next album come soon. // 10

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overall: 8.7
With Teeth Reviewed by: FooFighter324, on may 11, 2005
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Sound: Trent Reznor was amazing on this album. But some of the songs were overall weird, but some like "The Hand That Feeds" or "Everyday Is Exactly The Same" were great. Reznor sounded a little more sane on this album compared to his last where some of the music was just noise. // 8

Lyrics: Some of the lyrics were creative like "The Hand That Feeds." I mean who could come up lyrics like that. Reznor did. Also some were a little cheesy like "All The Love In The World" and "With Teeth" but it was all good. Reznor is an amazing singer and makes him look better on this album. // 8

Overall Impression: This album is by far, one of the best albums put out in 2005. I think in my book, "With Teeth" was compared to one of my other favourite albums, Audioslave's self-titled album (2002). This is definatley worth the buy, so NIN fans, grab this CD, because this is definatley a keeper. // 10

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overall: 4
With Teeth Reviewed by: unregistered, on may 14, 2005
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Sound: It's all beautiful. I liked the entire album. I did feel that "You Know What You Are" didn't quite fit in with the other music, but it still sounded good. With Teeth was a little repetitive. The bass line never really gave much progression, but the guitar and synth compensated for that. Trent worked excellent with Reason's softsynth engine. The Music is truely beautiful and easily gets stuck in your head. // 1

Lyrics: The lyrics are great. I had anticipated so. Trent said that this album would be more lyrics based than the Fragile was. The hand that feeds lyrics had deep meaning. I think he's talking about religion. He's not so much putting religion down, but he questions it. It was genious. // 1

Overall Impression: This is my favorite album yet. I'm completely stuck on it and haven't listened to anything else for weeks. 5/5. No question. Pick it up today! // 10

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overall: 6
With Teeth Reviewed by: unregistered, on may 21, 2005
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Sound: Sound? At times, like Trent Reznor is wearing a cape made of human skin. This is the sound of Nine Inch Nails for the new century, as he will show you on the album's opener "All The Love In The World," on which he uses technology to make himself sound like an entire church full of soulful black women. This album also features the horrible sound of Dave Grohl playing drums. // 6

Lyrics: Reznor's lyrics run the gamut from bad to God awful. "A-with-a Teeth-a!", he mumbles on the title track. "Evar-ee day is exactly da same," enunciates Reznor on "Every Day Is Exactly The Same," sounding exactly like the dull-witted hillbilly that he is. And on the albums lone aggressive track "You Know What You Are?", he barely manages the anger level of a self-mutilating Dairy Queen employee. // 4

Overall Impression: Overall, I was pleased with Reznor's latest effort. His newfound maturity is evident on track such as "Only," with it's hilarious bits of rapping and horrible general MIDI drum loops, and "Beside You In Time" on which Reznor mumbles nonsense while raping your ears with godawful sound effects for several minutes. All in all this is a profound new sound upon which Reznor will build an altar of bones. // 8

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overall: 10
With Teeth Reviewed by: unregistered, on may 27, 2005
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Sound: Same old Trent. There's all the usual trademark sounds of NIN on this record. Intricate piano melodies, raw guitars and bounding drums. Although the abandenment of programmed drums for one Dave Grohl on drums may not sit well with some fans, it gives the album a far more groove than ever before. The opening track 'All The Love In The World' introduces us back to Trent and his fragile drum and bass refrains and then tears it all up with others such as 'Know What You Are' and 'Love Is Not Enough'. When the final note of 'Right Where It Belongs' fades out, not only have your ears been opened sonically but the reberation of the walls beggs you to have another listen. // 10

Lyrics: Trent is just a genious. Full Stop. From the howl's of 'Don't you f--king know what you are?' to the crooning of 'Will you bite the hand that feeds you?' Trent hit's on all kinds of subjects such as politics, social identy and (gasp) love. Whatever the subject, all of Trent's lyrics are meaningful and sung with such energy and emotion that it gives each track another level of meaning. // 10

Overall Impression: Absolutely incredible. It's been some six years since the release of the epic 'The Fragile' which was written under paranio and excess drug use. And now NIN present us with the album 'With Teeth' which seems a far more cohesive work than anything before, in short more like an album of rock songs. Sure some fans might not like the fact that Trent has cleaned up a few tracks for mainstream but there is still no lack of aggression and energy in anyone. It more than meets expectations that we expect from Trent now and stands up just fine next to his other work. The seems that all the waiting really paid off. // 10

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overall: 8.7
With Teeth Reviewed by: unregistered, on june 09, 2005
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Sound: This is caffeine Trent. Focussed, energetic, coherent and minus excess. It's what you expect from an intelligent, creative individual who is trying to stop hurting himself with his own habits. A lot of his fans may be at this same point in their life, reviewing the assumptions they made in the name of art or love or just general debauchery. The world won't swirl when you listen to this album, but you can't help but smile to the simple, yet complex, resolutions and conclusions it comes to both sonically and lyrically. // 8

Lyrics: The symplicity of the vocabulary matches the low fi aesthetic of this deceptively complex album. A lot of the lyrical content reflects on Trent's eventual recognition of his own ultimate insignificance, and I can sympathize with that age earned realization. So many of these songs are the recognition of fading away. These aren't your run of the mill angsty odes to bitter surreal strength. Futility really. It's very beautiful. He aged well with me. That validates myself, as a long time fan of Trent. NIN fands of old should be more than a little embarassed at the self indulgement of it all, this album acknowledges the bitter sweetness of that. // 10

Overall Impression: It fits well in the ovum of NIN albums, and is, as before mentioned in many previous reviews, inordinatley addictive. That makes me think that Trent knows something about this album that I don't know, and I keep listening. Which is rare these days. It's been stuck in my CD player for weeks. It comes out now and agin, and I think I'm done, but then it's back like herpes. It doesn't seem to be that great of an album, in the scope of all the albums I could listen to, but it keeps coming back. Why? Do I want it to be that good that bad? Maybe. But I give the man, and the sound, more credit than that. It is not nearly as good as his other albums, perhaps on par with Fragile, but it is good in a whole different direction. It does not have the pathos of the other albums. It's too intellectual (although it doesn't seem that way... it seems simple and even juvenile, but that's a very clever aesthetic) and bitter. This album shouldn't make goth girls rub each other's titts. They might, but it's because of the old songs. This is for the sad assholes who realized self importance fades with time and leaves you with the mature, but sober reflection that square one happens over and over again. How dismal.? Or how freeing... eternal return to base level nothing... buddhist sand paintings. If an album built on these themes can make you come back, with a simplistic shell surrounding it so innocently, then there is genius at work, again. It's just not going to make me mosh. // 8

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overall: 8.7
With Teeth Reviewed by: zenabi879, on june 09, 2005
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Sound: First of all, the fact that the album was available as a dual disc (which offers the entire album in DVD 5.1 format) was cool for a NIN record. Since they use so many tracs, the 5.1 seperation is nice. This album is more comparable to Pretty Hate Machine in that it has more of a "band" feel than a "studio" feel. You get drums, guitar, bass, and vocals (and Trent's piano) which almost makes it a jam record instead of a project like "Fragile," no soundscapes on this one. It does get a bit repetitive though they could have spent some more time on the guitars but not enough to complain about. // 8

Lyrics: Trent has always been a good lyric writer, always creative and this album isn't any different. // 10

Overall Impression: Content wise, to me, this album is one of those that needs to be played start to finish to get the whole effect. It does get a bit repetitive and I keep feeling like it's lacking something. The album glows all the way through and gets red hot but never catches fire (if that makes sense). But all in all it's worth buying because it is a good album and has a cool sound to it (speaking audio wise). // 8

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overall: 8.7
With Teeth Reviewed by: unregistered, on june 10, 2005
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Sound: With Teeth provides all the signature NIN sounds, mixed up re-arranged and re-arranged again. The grindy torrent of guitars, off the wall drumbeats, and Trent's signature haunting piano melodies are all there. On this album, however, he does not hammer them into yor brain all at once forcing you to differentiate what is really going on. With teeth gives you just a taste of the signature sounds, well placed and leaving you waiting for more. The "funk" sound adds a new dimension to the whole picture. Hardcore NIN fans will probably skip those tracks searching for a resurrection of Happiness in Slavery or Gave Up somewhere on the album, but they are not gonna find it. Trent has evolved into making music with dark feeling rather than breaking up furniture with a chainsaw. // 8

Lyrics: Lyrically speaking Trent is right on course. Before he was just plain angry, and now he is full of questions and reflection. He hit the music scene hard, crashed and has risen from the ashes. Now though he has new priorities, new concerns and new questions. The lyrics are not hopeless, but rather leave things open ended. Right where it Belongs speaks volumes about his state of mind. He questions reality and makes you focus inward on how the world is viewed. In Every Day is Exactly The Same, Trent makes the comment that he is still inside you, and a little bit comes bleeding through. This line sums up how he feels these days I think. His past angst, frustration and pain are still with everyone who has shared in his music, and still comes through no matter where he ends up. // 10

Overall Impression: All in all I think this is one of the better NIN albums. It has more variety and larger range of emotions. The Downward Spiral builds to a climax and then lets us down easy. Broken just kicks your ass all over the room and leaves you for dead. With Teeth grabs you and keeps you guessing. Its focused and well thought out, and definetely needs a few listens before it sinks in. He knows right where to hit you and when to lay off. Even the hardcore NIN fans wishing for the days of Broken cant help but stop and notice the evolution from anger to reflection. He doesn't want you to mosh too much anymore, he wants you to revel in lyric and savor the experience. He's almost saying it's time to look at the big picture. Reflection rather than rage, asking the most basic human question of why are we here and what the hell is the purpose of all this. I think Trent got some religion, not an organized religion, but one he's created for himelf. His war with God is never over, but I think he has grounded himself and focused on the next step, rather than the angst driven tunes that got him here. Unfortunately, the tone of this album makes it feel like almost a Swan Song for this melodical genius, I hope that's not the case. // 8

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overall: 5.3
With Teeth Reviewed by: Kurt Russell, on august 08, 2005
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Sound: This album sounds like Trent Reznor started a completely new band. On songs like "The Hand That Feeds," it almost sounds like pop. I think he needs to start doing drugs again, because I was extremely disappointed with this album. It's just not Nine Inch Nails! There are however some good songs on it. "Beside You In Time" is actually quite amazing. // 6

Lyrics: The lyrics are probably where this album suffers most. Trent Reznor has never been a very talented lyricist. He's an amazing singer, but as far as lyrics go, they've always been kind of corny, "I can't believe my life" sort of thing. The quality of the music on his previous albums is enough to redeem that, or even enhance it but this is just too much. "No longer concerned with fitting into the world, your world, that is." This has to be one of the stupidest things I've ever heard in a song. // 4

Overall Impression: This does not compare to other Nine Inch Nails albums at all. This is the worst one. I'm not saying it's a terrible album, it's just not very good. I'd have to say the best songs on With Teeth are "The Line Begins To Blur" and "Beside You In Time." Both of those are actually on par with Nine Inch Nails standards. I can't say I actually love anything about this album, but there are things I hate; mostly the lyrics. I also hate the idea that, if this is Trent Reznor's last album, he'll be leaving behind such a shitty legacy, and he's better than that. // 6

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overall: 8
With Teeth Reviewed by: unregistered, on december 08, 2005
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Sound: Nine Inch Nails have given us something different on this effort. It is a more stripped down musical endeavor leaving nothing but the pulsing drums in your ears. To tell you the truth I was looking for something similar to the musical layers and instruments on the fragile. If you listen deeply trent still uses these techniques of layering, he just perfects it so it blends into the sounds of the songs. "Beside You In Time" is a track which every NIN fan will love and will be waiting for on the entire album, it's an instrumental which portrays Reznor's talent holding onto his previous work like on the fragile but with a fresher sound. Bascially the sound on this album is lyrics and drums. If you enjoy drum beats, droning synths and stripped down vocals, this album is for you. // 7

Lyrics: Reznor is much more precise in his use of lyrics and how he sings. The whole idea with the record was to throw 13 good punches and never look back. Reznor has definitly done this. He has thrown out the instrumentals and gone straight to the heavy vocals and melodies. The opener "All The Love In The World" is one of the best and compelling tracks. In the end of the song he harmonizes with himself and with any other musician this may seem boring and pointless but reznor definitely pulls it off. On previous NIN records you were more intoxicated with heavy sounds and layering and screaming vocals (Fragile, Downward Spiral), but With Teeh focuses on reznor's singing ability and the ability to tie it in with the fresh sounds of the record. // 8

Overall Impression: If I try to compare this CD with another artist, I simply cannot. To me, this album is revolutionary and already I can hear mimics of his pulsing drum sounds and just about everything else. Every other musician is afraid to take away everything useless and distracting in their songs, but reznor confidently pulls all that is irrelevant out and leaves you with drums, guitars and vocals. He doesn't only leave you with basic melodies at all, you just have to listen carefully like on previous albums and you can hear the complexities in sound beneath the simplicities of the song. The overall impression is brilliant. The first time I heard the album, it definitely challenged me musically, but I found myself unable to stop listening to it. That obviously means that if it is worth listening seven times in a row, NIN have done their job. Warning: if you are hoping for the Fragile part II you will never find it on this record. It is something new and fresh and still rocks but just with more precision and mania beneath its beats. // 9

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overall: 7.3
With Teeth Reviewed by: alex73013, on december 17, 2005
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Sound: Very well orchestrated album comparable to the Fragile. I am a big fan of Nine Inch Nails. Downward Spiral, contrary to most people's views, is not my favorite album. I tied between Fragile and With Teeth because the orchestration and amount of listenable songs. The simple keyboard work on the last song of the album combined with the different segments of the song pull together pretty great. Overall, it's a well orchestrated album with great musicians. // 8

Lyrics: The lyrics are better than Pretty Hate Machine but equal to the rest. He's not crying about "His self confidence" or "Tripped on the tears I (he) cried." The Fragile had a pretty good show case of his lyrics in my opinion. One criticism of Trent's lyrics is that he starts out "I" this, "I" that... Very introspective but if any of his albums have unity it would be his self obsession into his speudo depression. But I love it, it appeals to my inner teenage angst (I'm really 22 years old). // 5

Overall Impression: If you like industrial rock played by people who know how to play their instruments and the impression of a concept of music theory, check this band and album out. // 9

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