Wish You Were Here Review

artist: pink floyd date: 07/23/2009 category: compact discs
pink floyd: Wish You Were Here
Released: Sep 15, 1975
Genre: Rock
Tones: Sophisticated, Nocturnal, Cerebral, Refined/Mannered, Wintry, Ominous, Eerie, Reflective
Styles: Prog-Rock/Art Rock
Number Of Tracks: 5
 Sound: 9.9
 Lyrics: 9.6
 Overall Impression: 9.9
 Overall rating:
 9.6 
 Reviewer rating:
 9.8 
 Users rating:
 9.4 
 Votes:
 121 
reviews (17) 30 comments vote for this album:
overall: 9.7
Wish You Were Here Reviewed by: The Lunatic, on october 10, 2005
4 of 8 people found this review helpful

Sound: This was the first ever Floyd album I listened to, and has to be the album I'd take to a deserted album. It just oozes that Pink Floyd aura I know and love. The music, I would define, as Psychedelic: the synthesiser effects is Shine On You Crazy Diamond and Welcome To The Machine add to the over all marvel of this album. // 10

Lyrics: The lyrics, like a lot of Floyd's post-Barret albums, are about Syd, the original frontman of Pink Floyd. Remember when you were young? You Shone like the sun? Shine On You Crazy Diamond. Syd Barret; the Crazy Diamond. This gets fairly repetative in your CD collection, the refrences to Syd, so although the lyrics are inspiring to say the least. // 9

Overall Impression: My favurite song from the album is Wish You Were Here. It is the first song I got guitar tabs for and is still my favurite song to play. I realy love the way that when I listen, I just immediatly switch off, relaxe. I love to listen to Floyd when doing essays or papers and this just gives me the insiration to do this. // 10

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overall: 10
Wish You Were Here Reviewed by: unregistered, on april 22, 2004
1 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sound: Pink Floyd created multiple sounds on this album. From the "manufactured" sound in "Welcome To The Machine" (not as in over-produced, as in actual machines working) to the epic-rock sound of "Shine On Your Crazy Diamond Parts VI-IX", Pink Floyd finds the perfect sound to each song. So they have the right sound for each song, that doesn't mean that the songs are good, right? Wrong. The album moves seamlessly from song to song, using innovative bridges between songs (the sound of sand blowing in the wind, zooming out of the sound, etc.). The guitar parts are probably the best sounds on the album. From the simplicity of the acoustic guitar on the title track to the wavy guitar on "Shine On Your Crazy Diamond Parts I-V", David Gilmour shows that he took some time to make sure that all the guitar fits together with the lyrics and other sounds. // 10

Lyrics: It's rare that I'll ever find lyrics that make me think and feel the song. Emphasis on feel. It's one thing to understand what the singer is saying, it's another to feel what the singer's singing about. Every song on this album gives a much deeper look at seemingly innocent things. Roger Waters' lyrics are insanely brilliant on this album. From the poetic descriptions in both sections of "Shine On Your Crazy Diamond" ("You were caught in the crossfire of childhood and stardom, blown on the steel breeze.") to the beautifully painted picture in "Wish You Were Here" ("We're just two lost souls swimming in a fish bowl..."), every song has it's shining points of brilliance, rare on an album. The highlight, of course, would be the title track.The song gives a sense of mystery, with the guitar adding to the intrigue. The song pulls you in with the first line ("So, so you think you can tell Heaven from Hell..."), and continues to question your reality in a sense of an alternate truth, leading up to the wonderful final verse. As each song passes, it seems that it would've been impossible to write lyrics this profound and deep, and yet, here they are. A true gem in Pink Floyd's career (as a group and all the solo careers). // 10

Overall Impression: Perhaps nothing, this is Pink Floyd's best album. The lyrics are extremely strong, and the guitar/piano/bass/drums are brilliantly woven together. This doesn't show one person conducting a group, this shows a band that put some effort into making a great album. When I first looked at this album, I was very suprised. There were five tracks that added up to about 44 minutes. I was a bit worried at first that the songs would die down midway and sort of drift through the remainder. However, I was pleasantly suprised to see that each song stood strong through it's 5+ minutes. This is a must-buy for any fan of psychedelia, rock, ballads, great lyrics, or great guitar work. The album is worth the cost for the title track alone. Highly recommended. // 10

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overall: 10
Wish You Were Here Reviewed by: SoulStripper7, on november 15, 2004
1 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sound: The sound of this album is very different from other albums because of the sound effects they used. For example, at the beginning of Welcome To The Machine, it sounds like someone is going up an elevator. Or at the beginning of Wish You Were Here, you hear the guitar coming out of what sounds to be a transistor radio. The music is not simple yet not complex. It's just in between, which is probably why people like it so much. // 10

Lyrics: The lyrics are a mix of a tribute to their old singer and guitar player, Syd Barrett, who destroyed his mind with LSD, and the disgust of what happens with the music industry. In Have A Cigar, the lyrics display how your manager or record label will try to flatter you and stuff so they can get what you want. In Welcome To The Machine, it shows that the industry is a machine and that they take all the willing musicians and totally twist and mutilate what they want to do. In the other songs, they sing about Syd Barrett. In Shine On You Crazy Diamond, the lyrics seem to describe him and what he was, and in Wish You Were Here... well, the title says it all. The lyrics also mesh quite nicely with the music, for they both give off the same feel. The singers, David Gilmour and Roger Waters, are very, very good on this, and although this album doesn't display their best singing skills, as did The Wall and Dark Side of the Moon, they are still very talented. On Have a Cigar, they get someone else to sing the lyrics because Roger Waters found that he could not sing the song the way he wanted to. // 10

Overall Impression: This album is probably one of the best albums of all time, and certainly on the best of the band's. The highlights of the album would have to be Welcome to the Machine or Wish You Were Here. Unfortunately, the album is not very long, for it only contains 5 songs. I would most definitly buy it again if it was lost. // 10

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overall: 10
Wish You Were Here Reviewed by: unregistered, on september 05, 2005
1 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sound: This album is excellent in every aspect from start to finish. Shine On Part 1 is perfect in every way. The key/synths are great, and the solos are regarded as some of Gilmours finest. Welcome To The Machine is the perfect blend of acoustic guitars and synths with some of the albums darker lyrics and vocals. Have A Cigar is one of my personal favorites from the opening palm muting and riff to the one of Gilmours rawest and better solos. Wish You Were Here is an absolute classic. The riff is so simple (as is the Floyd's stlye), yet so moving and memorable. Everybody knows and loves the song. Shine On Part 2 is the perfect way to close one of the greatest albums of all time. Some more keys and synths, a slide guitar solo played with a Zippo, David Gilmours way of paying homage to Syd. And a funk-jazz jam session in the middle with some of Rick Wrights finest piano/organ work that fades back into the rythm of Shine On Part 1. The overall sound of the album varies, from electronic synths to acoustic guitars and jazz organs and funk bass. This is classic Floyd, ever progressing and always doing things differently. // 10

Lyrics: The lyrics on Wish You Were Here are simply genious, because, well, Roger Waters is after all a lyrical genious. Heavily metaphorical, as is most of the Floyds lyrics. Obviously reffering to Syd Barret, Pink Floyds original frontman and lead guitarist. Syd went schizophrenic after too many acid trips and maybe a mental illness that went unrecognized since birth. Roger started to miss Syd, and wrote Wish You Were Here about him. Some of the metaphors are in Shine On You Crazy Diamond, if you skip over every word and put the first letters together, you get SYD ((S)hine On (Y)ou Crazy (D)iamond). Another is the lyric, "You reached for the secret too soon, you cried for the moon", the "secret" is A Saucerful Of Secrets, the first album the Floyd realesed without Syd (with the exception of the song Jugband Blues) and the "moon" is reffering to Dark Side Of The Moon, the last album before Wish You Were Here. // 10

Overall Impression: This album is perfect in every way, shape and form. It is definately one of, if not the best Pink Floyd albums. My favorite songs are Shine On and Wish You Were Here (who doesn't love that song?) I love everything about it. If it was stolen I would immediatly buy another one, after hunting down the person who stole it, and congradulating him on their choice of album to steal. // 10

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overall: 10
Wish You Were Here Reviewed by: unregistered, on december 16, 2006
1 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sound: This album has the widest coverage of the Pink Floyd Sound. From Shine On You Crazy Diamond (synthesized) to Wish You Were Here (acoustic). The album was made basically as a tribute to Syd Barrett mainly the song Shine On You Crazy Diamond. The last album until A Momentary Lapse of Reason to have equal input from the whole band and it shows in a good way. // 10

Lyrics: The lyrics are meaningful. Shine On You Crazy Diamond talks about Syd's mental disease. Welcome to the Machine is about not breaking out and following the conveyer belt of life (depicted in The Wall movie) could be considered the first dab at The Wall. Have a Cigar is full of sarcastic lyrics (which one's Pink) and features an outsider singing. Wish You Were Here could also be about Syd or a loved one. This is the last album not dominated by Roger Waters vocals until he left the band. // 10

Overall Impression: This is the best Pink Floyd album. Possibly the best album of the '70s other than Boston and Led Zeppelin IV. The album is really 4 songs being that Shine On You Crazy Diamond Parts VI-IX is really a filler. That's the only bad thing about the album otherwise flawless and classic Pink Floyd. Wish You Were Here and Have a Cigar stand out as the best songs but Welcome to the Machine is right up there. If it were lost I would definitley buy it again. Here's an overview of the best album of '75. 01. Shine On You Crazy Diamond Parts I-V - this song features several solos until the vocals enter. Starting with the more noise than music intro followed by a sax solo and a long guitar solo. 02. Welcome To The Machine - much like Crazy Diamond by having several synthesizers and effects. Contains the most obscure vocals ever by David Gilmour. 03. Have A Cigar - a light side to the two previous tracks and much shorter Have a Cigar is about the Pink Floyd story to a point. Some of Gilmour's best guitar work is featured here. 04. Wish You Were Here - one of the greatest Rock N' Roll songs ever and an acoustic no less. Listen for Gilmour's cough at about the 25 second mark. 05. Shine On You Crazy Diamond Parts VI-IX - not much to be said about this song adds more solos and this time Roger Waters sings. // 10

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overall: 10
Wish You Were Here Reviewed by: sg255, on march 24, 2008
1 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sound: The sound of this album was quite a big leap from DSOTM, with a lot more synth, and less female vocals. It also displays the Floyd's biggest range of styles, from heartfelt acoustic of the title track, to the riffs of Have A Cigar, to the various solos of Shine On, to the rythmic synths of Welcome to the Machine, this is the perfect album for people new to the band. David Gilmours guitar work is second only to that in Animals, again showing the wide variety of skills at his disposal. It's no wonder the band view this as their best work. // 10

Lyrics: Of all of Rogers lyrics, theese are probably the ones he feels strongest about, or did at the time. They display the bands distaste at the music buisness, and the fact that they miss their friend and former bandmate, Syd Barrett. They are simple and accessible, and convey the strong emotions the Waters was feeling. I can honestly say that no other album has consistantly made me think about the lyrics. // 10

Overall Impression: The reason I've given this album full points in every catagory, is because truly, I think it is the best work by the Floyd, and one of, if not the greatest albums ever written. No other group can match the originality and genius of the Floyd. I can't say which track is best/worst as they are all amazing. If pushed, my personal favourite would have to be Wish You Were Here. If you haven't purchased this album, then buy it now, if you do, treasure it and tell everyone you know about it. If lost, I would instantly buy again. In my eyes, the best album ever made. // 10

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overall: 9
Wish You Were Here Reviewed by: zope, on june 04, 2009
1 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sound: This record is definitely my favorite Pink Floyd record. Eventhough this is the record where Roger Waters tyranny begins, the record still is defined by a unity and a harmony between the band members and it is transmited greatly into the music. Since Meddle, Pink Floyd stopped experimenting their sound and defined it as merely progressive with nice vocal harmonies, cool choruses, catchy parts but complex meaningful instrumental parts. This records marks the beginning of Roger Waters' era but the other band members still got their influence in. Something that I admire in Pink Floyd is the equal significance of each band member at least up to this record. David Gilmours guitar playing is unique and it is suited perfectly to Pink Floyd's sound. His bending solo's are perfect for Shine On's mood, his strumming is amazing in Welcome to the Machine, his Have a Cigar Solo is one of the greatest guitar solos of all time, his acoustics in Wish You Were Here are very meaningful, and his way of singing is awesome. Nick Mason' drumming is also pretty good, even though he is not as influential as say One Of These Days, and his playing is not as powerful and crazy as in previous records, he finds his way to be merely percussive and helps in the moods. He's best performance is in both Shine On parts. Roger Waters is a genius as we all know, he is responsible for most of the songwriting in this record and he plays bass in a very special way. He is not as many bass players which are quiet and kind of shy, a bit dorky too, no, he is totally the opposite but this is because he is a guitar player who displaced his job to bass playing to give way to Syd Barret and David Gilmour. He is a great multi instrumentalist capable of composing and arranging in all the instruments and personally I don't like pick playing in bass but he does it very well and he creates a melodic mood playing his unique part. His best performances are Shine On and Have a Cigar. Richard Wright, RIP, is my favorite keyboard player only behind Jon Lor, in this record he finally finds himself as the mood manager of the songs. He doesn't contribute to any song as merely his as he used to with Time and Us and Them for example, but he does a very nice job in Shine on, Machine and Cigar, I miss his voice since he has no lead vocals, this record mark his decadence in the Floyd due to Waters' tyranny and mistreatment towards him. 01.Shine On You Crazy Diamond: this song starts off with a long instrumental part consisting of several guitar and keyboard solos. The lyrics are about Syd Barret and his mental state. Sung by Roger Waters backed by David Gilmour and some female chorus gives an extremely chilling mood. David Gilmour performs greatly in the verses and choruses, doing fills, arpeggiating and riffing out very well. There are also wind solos in the song that are backed by the band very nice. The sax fades out backed up by some arpeggios by David and a Chord sustainded by Wright. 02.Welcome To The Machine: you still hear the Sax at the beginning of the song when there are some space ship sounds played. The bass plays some notes giving way to a very dissonant strum on David Gilmour's twelve strings followed by some chords played by the Keyboard. I love the voice parts where you hear David Gilmour screaming and at the same time an almost talked voice sings the same lyrics. This is basically a song where Roger Waters bashes the whole record company with their control and oppression over bands who want to play music, good quality music instead of hit shitty pop songs. Between verses David strums his guitar, Roger accompanies with some nice bass parts while Rick Synthethisers our asses with some great sounds that just give me the chill. The song continues with another verse and a long outro full of synth, strums and bass is played. No drums in the song. The song fades out. 03.Have A Cigar: a strong bass part starts off giving way to the entire band to join in without David, he comes in later with a couple of lick and then he develops an amazing cabaret sound with Rick where it sounds as if they are actually communicating. This song is sung by Roy Harper, folk singer, who's voice fitted perfectly in the song. The song tells the story of Pink Floyd starting as a band and being trying to get manipulated by the Music Industry, they maintained their style very well thank god. Then David shows his skills developing what could be his second best solo only behind Comfortably Numb. The song suddenly has a change in it's sound to fade into some noises and give way to the record's best track. 04.Wish You Were Here: I don't know if this song is sad, happy, very emotional or what but it gives me chills the whole way through. This is Pink Floyds best track for many, for me it isn't just because there is a master piece called echoes on top. The song is a very nice arrangement of acoustic guitars with arpeggios and acoustic solos. David Gilmour sings very nicely. I like that there is no Verse Chorus structure it just goes through singing very deep lyrics. There is not much keyboard, I would've liked that Rick would got more participation singing at least in this song but the song is perfect as it is. Roger Waters backs David in the second part before giving way to the outro solo where some keyboards are merely heard. 05.Shine On You Crazy Diamond: again this second part is highly instrumental, it seals the record in an amazing way, Roger develops some very nice bass playing at the beginning reminding me of One Of These Days but not as hard. Here Rick gets to play again as he is meant to, and the harmony you get from the four of them playing along is just great. They come together as a whole in this song showing that they know what they're doing together, showing that they're meant to be together. They are an amazing band and in this song there is no player being more important than any other, the alchemy between the four is just perfect. The verses are the same melodically as the first part (Of course the lyrics are different), and the song gives way to the outro of the album just fading out instrument by instrument until it fades and you come out of this trip that the Pink Floyd put together in 1975. // 9

Lyrics: The lyrics are mainly about Syd Barret starting with Shine On where it is defined that the subject is in not a good mental state. Then Welcome to The Machine and Have A Cigar tell how the record industry affects peoples mind and bands as a whole. Then Wish you Were Here, well the title gives it away, referring to Syd Barret, and finally Shine On Part 2 revisits Syd Barret's state of mind. // 9

Overall Impression: The overall impression, if I wasn't clear before, it is just amazing. You put the record on and lay back and you travel in an amazing trip. This record was, to me, Pink Floyds Highest point. They reached evolved from Piper through Saucerful, through Ummaguma and Atom Heart Mother until they got to Meddle. They did Dark Side Of The Moon in a whole new level and reached the Sky with this record, the unity and a solid sound, where no more crazy experimentation took place, was reached in this record, then even though Animals and The Wall are great records with a very important message and meaning, every thing was downhill as a band. If you want to chill out and relax, put this record on, definitely a must for any Rock fan. // 9

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overall: 9.7
Wish You Were Here Reviewed by: TheLlamaMan, on july 23, 2009
1 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sound: Wish You Were Here is a concept album by progressive legends Pink Floyd, and is their 9th studio album. This album had a lot to live up to considering how much of a smash hit their previous album, The Dark Side of the Moon, was. I personally believe that Pink Floyd delivered amazingly and went beyond what was expected of them. Pink Floyd does an amazing job with this album and making it flow, the transitions between songs being so perfect that half of the time you hardly even realize that the songs have changed. Although the transitions are so smooth, this doesn't mean that all of the songs are the same, in fact it's quite the opposite. Each song in the album has a different feel while keeping the same concept in place, making it easy to listen to each song both individually and - for the whole experience - as an album from start to finish. The album is not terrifically long, clocking in at just under 45 minutes. Yes, this is a bit of a letdown especially considering how much you get into the music, but instead of a long album you listen to once, it's a album that you're going to listen to over and over again. You can tell Pink Floyd has had fun experimenting with sound on this album, and has expanded from just the traditional bass, drums, guitar, and vocals that one would expect from a band in that era. In fact, in this album (especially on the bookend tracks "Shine on You Crazy Diamond") it is not uncommon to hear band members play multiple instruments throughout the course of the track. From synths to lap guitars to saxophone to strange tape effects, this album will blow your mind over and over again, and its clear the band has pushed the limitations of what makes a rock band. David Gilmour, Roger Waters, Nick Mason, and Richard Wright have all done a tremendous job with this album, and have created what is surely a masterpiece in the eyes of all classic rock, progressive rock, psychedelic rock, and any other type of rock fans. This album feels like one huge trip, truly an experience like no other. Although there are little bits and pieces of areas that could be improved on in places in the album, they are too little compared to all of the positives and greats we see. Nothing's perfect, but this is pretty close. // 10

Lyrics: The lyrics on this album focus generally on two things. The first would have to be Syd Barret and of his departure from the band as well as his mental breakdowns. "Shine on You Crazy Diamond", and the albums title track, "Wish You Were Here" are about Syd, and although it might seem straight forward, the lyrics are full of metaphors, meanings, and emotions that really help you get absorbed in the music. The other two tracks, "Welcome to the Machine" and "Have a Cigar", both focus on the bands obvious negative feelings towards the music industry. They're about the greed and exploitation that occurs in the music industry out of sight of everyone else. Once again, it's a fairly straight forward idea, but Pink Floyd makes it more then just a song, but an experience. For actual vocals, we mostly have Roger Waters and David Gilmour (an outside musician, Roy Harper, sang the vocals for "Have a Cigar"). Waters sings for the vocal segments in "Shine on You Crazy Diamond", where as Gilmour sings for "Wish you Were Here" and "Welcome to the Machine". Both are clearly talented vocalists who know what they are doing and have very powerful voices that can instantly get you into the mood of the songs. They're not necessarily the BEST singers out there, but they have a way of grabbing your attention and getting you to turn the volume up even louder. // 9

Overall Impression: After listening to this album from start to finish, it's clear that it is a masterpiece. It's an album that won't get old no matter how many millions of times you listen to it, and one that will definitely influence you greatly. My personal favourite tracks are "Shine on You Crazy Diamond" (Parts 1-9) and the title track "Wish You Were Here". This album is essential to any fan of any genre of rock, and anyone who listens to it will not be dissapointed. Pink Floyd has always been a band that's about making their albums into musical trips, and this is no exeption. An amazing album that everyone in the world should have a copy of. // 10

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overall: 9.3
Wish You Were Here Reviewed by: DemonRiffs, on april 21, 2004
0 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sound: "Wish You Were Here" represents a high point in Pink Floyd's post-psychedelia period. Although Dark Side Of The Moon is an excellent album as well, This is the album which most exemplifies what Pink Floyd are capable of creating with a more purely "progressive" sphere. Alos, it may very well represent the last time that Gilmour and Waters actually seemed to be collaborators on the music in question, not to mention the last time that Richard Wright (Keyboards) had a truly substantial role to fill (Nick Mason (Drums), not surprisingly, is generally irrelevant). With "The Wall" and especially "The Final Cut", Waters had completely taken over the direction of the band. "Wish You Were Here", however, actually shows a band working with some sense of solidarity, and benefits because of it. // 10

Lyrics: "Wish You Were Here" is among the greatest prog ballads ever written, with lyrics suggesting a dangerous mystery (unquestionably referring to Roger Barrett, a hero in his own right) which still have the slightly elusive quality which they possessed on the initial release of the song. A triumph. // 8

Overall Impression: Arguably one of Pink Floyds best albums, and a historic milestone in the history of the band. Excellent. // 10

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overall: 10
Wish You Were Here Reviewed by: LedZeppelin, on may 28, 2004
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: The sound is very focused on keyboards and guitar, which is good- Floyd had a natural talent for making the sound not too electronic, and all the members have their own place in each song that fits with everything else. From the epic (someone else described it very well using that word) feel of Shine On You Crazy Diamond to the disturbing synthesizers of Have a Cigar and Welcome to the Machine to the acoustic goodness that is Wish You Were Here, every song has a distinct feel and feel like a mini-CD in and of themselves. // 10

Lyrics: Roger Waters can say so much with a single line- ("You reached for the secret too soon, you cried for the moon")- that it's insane. In Shine On You Crazy Diamond, which is dedicated to the band's former frontman, whose name I sadly cannot remember at the moment, you can tell that the song flows from sympathy to sadness to a sweet bitterness (hooray for oxymorons!) that really makes the CD have a sad, pittying quality to it. Roger Waters' strained voice on Welcome to the Machine gives the song a very eerie, awesome feeling to it. He's not the best singer ever, but he does very well for what voice he has. // 10

Overall Impression: I own Dark Side Of The Moon- and compared to this, Dark Side Of The Moon is definitely equal. While WYWH focuses on only a few aspects of life- separation and sadness, conformity, and the confines of the music industry (which sounds like a whiny rant at record companies, but it's done in a very tasteful way, much like every Floyd song), DSOTM focuses on life itself and society and how society ultimately creates and destroys life. Strangely enough, it feels like comparing apples and oranges. Every song on WYWH is perfect and I wouldn't change anything about it. If it were stolen or lost, I'd definitely get it burnt for me again- er, buy it again. It's definitely worth buying- but I'd suggest getting DSOTM first and then WYWH. // 10

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overall: 10
Wish You Were Here Reviewed by: floydDoors, on july 26, 2004
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: Wish you were here, as Pink Floyd keyboardist Rick Wright has said himself, "...it's our best album." Pink Floyd have been everything from pop-psychedelia underground pioneers to a grandiose concept album specialist, Wish You Were Here was slotted nicely in between the epic Dark Side of the Moon and the brooding Animals, and made for a smooth transition. Yet no matter which Floyd depiction you enjoy, Wish You Were Here (from here on out let's call it WYWH) delivers on every medium. If you loved Dark Side of the Moon songs like "Us and Them" and "Any Colour You Like," both of which feature long instrumental (the latter being completely) pieces, Shine On You Crazy Diamond can 'eclipse' them all no pun intended. Richard Wright starts it off with an almost spontaneous keyboard solo, and just when you're about to lose interest, along comes David Gilmour's trademark Stratocaster, or, if you're listening to Shine On Parts 6-9, you'll hear his lap-slide guitar being plucked or slid with his usual expertise, at around 20 minutes, Shine On clocks in as one of the longest songs, even by Floyd standards, the band has released. The two main themes of WYWH are the fallen Syd Barrett's (for those just tuning in, Pink Floyd's founder and, some say, lyrical genius who's psyche went awry after what is theorized as too much acid and a hint of previous mental illness) painful absence, and the corporate Big Brother. "Welcome To The Machine" isn't very melodic, and when placed with the rest of WYWH, does not really fit in. It features a Waters sung verse, with Gilmour joining for the brief chorus, but little else, aside from a building acoustic solo. Getting the lead vocal on the cynical "Have a Cigar" is Englishman Roy Harper. The guitar is a bit broken up, there is a lot of synthesizer, and is definitely a change from the melodic, longer Shine On. "Have A Cigar" features a blistering, Gilmour-esque guitar solo in the middle, backed by Wright's keyboards. All of a sudden the volume drops, it sounds as if the radio station has changed, then a TV is turned on for a moment, then comes the most heartfelt Pink Floyd song ever written, the title-track Wish You Were Here. Instead of the usual "Waters-penned, Gilmour beautified" Floyd song style, legend has is it David Gilmour was playing the main WYWH riff at Abbey Road studios and Roger immediately saw potential as another song for the album, and the both of them (imagine that?) wrote the song. A gruff Gilmour vocal and two acoustic guitars are joined mid-track by Wright's piano and Nick Mason's low-key percussion. An interesting solo precedes the chorus, with Gilmour mimicking his guitar on the higher frets and going falsetto before giving way to the last chorus. Waters and Gilmour sing together and finish out the song strong, and no one is left unsatisfied. // 10

Lyrics: WYWH's lyrics weren't similar to anything before, or since for that matter. "Welcome To The Machine" and "Have A Cigar" set the pace for the "Animals" album to follow two years later, showing Roger Waters as an increasingly domineering, angry young man with a vicious leftist political view and the distinctive voice medium to send his message. A definite highlight is the actual quote from a record executive regarding Pink Floyd in "Have a Cigar." (The band is just fantastic, that is really what I think.) "Oh by the way, which one's Pink? Shine On You Crazy Diamond and Wish You Were Here are much different. Both pay homage to the band's fallen friend, and while the music of Shine On may recall Meddle or Dark Side of the Moon, Roger Waters sounds his best when, after 7 minutes, the first words come in: "Rembember when you were young? You shone like the sun. Shine on you crazy diamond!" The delivery and choice of words is so heartfelt that you feel as if you knew Syd personally. Wish You Were Here has a very similar effect. It sounds as if Dave Gilmour is singing to you when he begins, "So... So you think you can tell? Heaven from Hell? Blue skies from pain...?" The definite highlight of the album is the flow. One song bleeds into the next so well, and although the two themes are very different, the album flows quite well. The way Roger Waters can set words to music is a talent surely missed by the remaining three Floyd members. // 10

Overall Impression: Although anything can be improved upon, it is quite difficult to find a weak spot in WYWH, the guitar drifts in "Shine On," but it never wanders. The guitar is very simple in Wish You Were Here, but it is the perfect medium for the words. "Have a Cigar" and "Welcome to the Machine" portray the anger and disdain for authority Roger Waters had in his mind at the time. The lyrics are among the best from Pink Floyd, because, for the most part, it was the last collective effort by the band. By Animals, Roger was in control, and by "The Wall" and the difficult-to-enjoy "The Final Cut," the classic-era Floyd had ended. For the beginning Pink Floyd fan, "Echoes: The Best of Pink Floyd" is a good starter because it chronicles everything from Barrett to Gilmour leading the band, but for the experienced fan, you already know the tracks! If you don't own WYWH, your parents probably do, so do what you have to do. Burn it, hear it on vinyl, hear it on CD, just listen to the flow of the music, because they just don't make 'em like they used to! // 10

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overall: 10
Wish You Were Here Reviewed by: unregistered, on may 24, 2005
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Sound: The sound on WYWH is probably the most solid work Pink Floyd has ever produced. The first track starts off with a spacey synth sound, and moves into, and steadily moves into guitar. The buildup of Shine on You Crazy Diamond is truly rewarding. Welcome To The Machine takes you to the darker side of the album, with its meloncholly, dreary rhythm, and mourning vocals. Have A Cigar starts off with that amazing guitar riff, and picks up pretty quick, unlike the other songs on this album. This song is probably my favorite on the CD. The solo on Have A Cigar has to be one of Gilmours best achievements as a guitarist. Wish You Were Here is the keystone point in the CD, giving one of the greatest and memorable accoustic songs of all time. Shine on You Crazy Diamond Pt. 2 is an amazing finale for a breathtaking album. I could almost shed a tear at the very end when the synth is playing the outro. // 10

Lyrics: In the heart of Pink Floyd, Gilmour is the primary singer and Waters is the songwriter. It's a great chemistry, and definately shows in this album probably more than any other of their albums. The lyrics in this album are by far the most gripping and heartfilled, that they have written. The lyrics in Shine on are a great tribute to Syd Barrett. Welcome to the Machine is some of the saddest words waters has written, but thay come through in a very powerful way. The Lyrics in Have A Cigar deal with the record industry, and how money, fame, and success was a goal of Barretts, but eventually destroyed him. Wish You Were Here brightens up the album with its happy lyrics, describing the bands feelings for Barrett. // 10

Overall Impression: This is definately my favorite album of the '70s. It's a complete masterpiece, and major high point in rock music. This was Pink Floyd at their most focused, and most cooperative. The concept of a friend/bandmate losing his mind due to the music industry, and the undying friendship that the band feels toward him is absolutely timeless. I recommend this album to everyone. // 10

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overall: 10
Wish You Were Here Reviewed by: ZeppelinFan3890, on june 28, 2006
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Sound: In 1973 Pink Floyd released their massive mainstream hit album Dark Side of the Moon, which will never stop being talked about. DSM was a hard act to follow, but in 1975, Pink Floyd delivered a great album in Wish You Were Here. Wish You Were Here was a main tribute to fallen bandmember Syd Barrett, whose story is known all too well by Pink Floyd fans. The album contains only five tracks and clocks in at 44:26. This may be a little disappointing, but each song is nothing short of incredible. David Gilmour and Roger Waters work together on vocals for most of the album (the exception being "Have A Cigar," which was sung by Roy Harper). They blend perfectly, as they always have, and give Pink Floyd's music the perfect lead. David Gilmour's guitar work is not highlighted here as much as DSM, but still proves just how good Gilmour is musically. The highlight for him is "Shine On You Crazy Diamond," where the guitar work really shines (allusion intended). Richard Wright is proably the lesser known of Floyd's four members. But his keyboarding is not be denied. It is not very prominent on this album, but the best of it can be found on "Wish You Were Here." Nick Mason's powerful drumming style was shown on DSM, and continues on this album, although not as prominent. His drumming is always what it needs to be. Roger Waters's bass work doesn't usually stand out, with the exception of classics "One Of These Days" and "Money." On Wish You Were Here, the bass is not prominent in any one song, but it's always there. And it's always rounding out Floyd's music nicely. All in all, Pink Floyd is one of the best musical groups of all time. And on Wish You Were Here, they prove that once again, with an album that, while not as big of a hit as Dark Side of the Moon, is without a doubt a classic. // 10

Lyrics: Roger Waters lyrics have always been some of the best. On Wish You Were Here, the main message is to ex-member Syd Barrett. "Shine On You Crazy Diamond" has brilliant lyrics that are brilliantly sang. They also contain several metaphors and allusions to Barrett, cleverly placed, if you can find them. The other three songs all contain great lyrics, but only one surprises "Shine On You Crazy Diamond," and that is of course "Wish You Were Here." It is perfectly sang by David Gilmour, and Roger Waters produces lyrics that will live forever. It doesn't take long to read the lyrics in the book for this album. And it also doesn't take long to convey their meaning, which is something uncharacteristic of Pink Floyd. Nevertheless, the lyrics are amazing yet simple. And whether it be Gilmour, Waters, or Harper singing, they comply perfectly into the music. // 10

Overall Impression: Wish You Were Here is not a huge mainstream hit, but wasn't too shabby considering the hard act it had to follow. The album is truly legendary, and for Pink Floyd fans, this is among their finest work. Ironically, most Pink Floyd fans never have Dark Side of the Moon as their favorite album. Here is a breakdown of each song: 01. Shine On You Crazy Diamond (Part One) - a long piece, stretching over 13 minutes long. But it delivers the classic Pink Floyd song. Soothing, melodic music with dramatic vocals. A great song highlighted by great guitar work from David Gilmour. 02. Welcome To The Machine - good sound effects kick off the song, and Gilmour soon comes in with more powerful vocals. Overall, this is a very powerful piece with clever lyrics and some interesting use of sound at the end. 03. Have A Cigar - this song takes the album in a different direction, giving off a different vibe. Regardless, it is a very dramatic song. The best part is probably the sarcastic lyrics with a possible reference to The Wall. 04. Wish You Were Here - this is it. It's arguable, but it's the best song on the album. And it's a classic. One of the songs Pink Floyd is most known for, with great acoustic work and absolutely amazing lyrics. Nothing about this song is disappointing. 05. Shine On You Crazy Diamond (Part Two) - it's a return to more of the same. A shorter fade in than part one, the final verse of lyrics, and then the outro that concludes the epic album. Overall this album is a classic. Realistically only four songs, and realistically four classic songs. // 10

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overall: 10
Wish You Were Here Reviewed by: Pork Tornado, on october 09, 2006
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Sound: I try not to be one of those people who think they really like something, so they just give it perfect 10s, but in this case, I think this album deserves it. This is not me being superficial. From the light celestial sound of Shine On, to the dark, creepy voice of Welcome to the Machine, to the phsycadelic rock of Have a Cigar, this album truly shines. Gilmours solos never fail to impress, and the keyboard synthesizer is used in perfect, awesomeness. Did I mention Wish You Were Here? One of the best albums of all time. // 10

Lyrics: As usual, the lyrics are pure genius. I can't get enough of it. Wish You Were Here was produced as a trubute to the fallen founder of Pink Floyd, Roger "Syd" Berret. The 9 part, 25 minute Shine On is a song produced in memory of Syd, who recently passed away. The lyrics of Welcome to the Machine and Have a Cigar delve into the evils of the record industry. Wish You Were Here is the best song in the world. // 10

Overall Impression: If you are a current Pink Floyd fan you will love this, and if you aren't, then this is the one to start with. It is definately my favorite allbum of all time, even over Dark Side and The Wall. I would pay for this album again, even if it hasn't been lost or stolen. It's perfect. // 10

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overall: 10
Wish You Were Here Reviewed by: VanzKantDanz, on june 23, 2007
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Sound: The sound on Wish You Were Here is far different from what the band had been doing up until then, you hear a lot of synth and keyboard action but it's different from what people were hearing on Dark Side and Meddle. The sound is very good, probably the best out of all the Floyd's albums. You go from hearing acoustic melodies like Wish and then straight into a synth-rock-guitar song like Have A Cigar, which also boasts a fantastic bass line by Waters. // 10

Lyrics: The lyrics like most post/Syd albums have meaning and clarity to them. Waters writes about things happening currently yet he is also writing about the past and everything in between. It's a fairly light hearted album (besides Welcome to The Machine) and I find that it's the only Floyd album that I can just enjoy without trying to find out what Waters is saying. It's incredibly detailed and well written but it's also very well sung. From Gilmour's strong touch and his scat singing on Wish to Roy Harper's agressive stint on Have A Cigar it is, through and through, a perfect vocally arranged album. // 10

Overall Impression: Wish is the best Floyd album in my overall opinion because of it's beauty and it's dynamic. It's a strong rock album but it delves deeper than that and reaches something in all of us. Songs that really stick out in my mind are Shine On and Wish because of the lyrics and how one (Shine) talks about Syd's life before and after and the other (Wish) talks about dealing with life without Syd and it is really beautiful and extremely meaningful. If anything were to happen to my personal copy, of course I would buy another and anyone who doesn't yet have a copy, do your self a favor and buy this album, it won't change your life but it will give you some good times to be remembered. // 10

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overall: 9.7
Wish You Were Here Reviewed by: Page/Rhoads, on december 26, 2007
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Sound: For an album that only has five songs, it sure makes up for it. This is one of my all time favorite albums. It is very instrumental, especially on Shine on You Crazy Diamond. Both parts. It strays a bit from the usual psychadelic Pink Floyd sound, but it remains a brillian classic rock album. The length of the songs also make up for there only being five. The shortest song is about 4 or 5 minutes long, so that should tell you a little something. Here's a little something you may not have known, or maybe you did. On the song Wish You Were Here, Pink Floyd showed they're genius once again. To get a fuller sound, David Gilmour sat in the corner of the room to play guitar and sing while the mike was set up in the middle of the room. Just a little bit of not so common information. // 10

Lyrics: The lyrics are all in tribute to Pink Floyd founder Syd Barrett. Lines like "Shine on you crazy diamond" and "You're never gonna die", are all about showing how great Syd was. British folk musician Roy Harper (yes, the guy from the Zeppelin song) sang lead on the song Have a Cigar. Gilmour also shows his vocal skills on the album, shining brightest on Wish You Were Here. // 9

Overall Impression: This is one of the best Floyd albums. It only has five songs, but it's worth the $15.99 or whatever the heck stores are charging. The best songs are Shine on You Crazy Diamond (Part One), Welcome to the Machine, Have a Cigar, Wish You Were Here, and Shine on You Crazy Diamond (Part Two). If you're counting, yes, that's all five. They truly display all of the members talents and passion. It is also the album that I usually listen to so I can fall asleep (that's a good thing). If it were lost, I wouldn't really want to pay that much for an album with 5 songs, but this album would be worth it. Maybe 2 copies. Maybe. // 10

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overall: 10
Wish You Were Here Reviewed by: Busproof, on november 03, 2008
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Sound: The second of many Pink Floyd concept albums, the general theme of this album revolves around previous singer Syd Barrett and the music industry, and evolves on the sound presented in their previous album, Dark Side of the Moon. Late keyboardist Richard Wright demonstrates innovative use of synthesizers on this album, especially in the tracks Shine on You Crazy Diamond (Parts I-IV) and (Parts VI-IX), and lyrically, the albums continues it's largely psychadelic and mellow sound, setting a spacey mood that sucks you into the album from the moment you start the CD. // 10

Lyrics: Lyrically, this album pays tribute to ex-singer and guitarist Syd Barrett (Shine on You Crazy Diamond... , Wish You Were Here) as well as criticizes the music industry (Welcome to The Machine, Have a Cigar). Vocally, this album is amazing. The tone and pitch of both Gilmour and Waters match the mellow that the album presents to the listener, as well as add to the psychadelic presence. // 10

Overall Impression: Its impossible to compare Pink Floyd to other artists because they're such an influencial and powerful group, however, compared to other albums of their's, Wish You Were Here definately expands on the work of Dark Side of the Moon, especially in the area of synthesizers and keyboard work. I love the album, and Pink Floyd in general, because of how well their albums seem to 'fit together'. The vocals and instrumental work match perfectly in mood and tone, and lyrically, their ingenious. If stolen, I'd hunt the dude down who stole it and beat him with his own shoe. Why? Because there is no replacing Pink Floyd, nor this album. I suggest this, as well as Dark Side of the Moon, to ALL fans of music, if not for the music itself, but for the philosophical lyrics. // 10

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