Lullabies To Paralyze Review

artist: queens of the stone age date: 06/28/2005 category: compact discs
queens of the stone age: Lullabies To Paralyze
Released: Mar 22, 2005
Genre: Rock
Styles: Hard Rock, Heavy Metal, Alternative Metal, Stoner Metal
Number Of Tracks: 14
Most notably, Lullabies lacks the manic metallic flourishes of their earlier work, and the gonzo humor and gimmicks.
 Sound: 9.2
 Lyrics: 8.9
 Overall Impression: 9
 Overall rating:
 9 
 Reviewer rating:
 9 
 Users rating:
 9 
 Votes:
 79 
reviews (13) 7 comments vote for this album:
overall: 9.3
Lullabies To Paralyze Featured review by: UG Team, on june 28, 2005
3 of 4 people found this review helpful

Sound: Queens Of The Stone Age seems to be the band with the fastest change of personnel. Or is it Josh Homme with some session-musicians now? Anyway, the band saved it's main asset I should say and their third album "Lullabies To Paralyze" just proved that. After the famous for naked-playing skills bassist Nick Oliveri left/was kicked out of the band, Homme, put away his projects Eagles Of Death Metal and the Desert Sessions and with nowdays members Joey Castillo (drums), Alain Johannes (bass), Troy Van Leeuwan (guitar), Natasha Shneider (keyboard) and Mark Lanegan (vocals) recorded a very cool album.

Every song on the album is very individual and has a life of its own. The record opens with a little acoustic ballad "Lullaby", which is a perfect song for a first track -? it puts you in a mystical dark mood and Mark Lanegan's deep voice only adds to its beauty. The follower "Medication" doesn't really suit in here, being a rough song that wakes you up like the sound of the alarm-clock at 7 in the morning. "Everybody Knows That You're Insane" seems like a song from Homme to Oliveri. As Josh says Nick did something that was worse that madness (now I can't stop thinking what that might have been) and that led to his retirement from the band. Personally I think that's a very good song to tell someone what you think about him/her -? not a lot of words in the song and endless "Everybody knows that you're insane" -- a really good expression of your feelings. The sound of grinding knifes, whispering in "The Blood is Love" and "Burn The Witch" makes you think of the old dark times of Jack the Ripper when people were killed on the streets and girls were burned just because someone said "She's a witch!" Boo!

And the record gets only creeper as it goes on. "Little Sister," being the first single from the album, comes from Homme's another project Desert Sessions. That's a wise trick to get more people involved into not a very popular band and to give a song another chance. There are some unusual flourishes on the record, which makes it sound different. In "Skin On Skin" you can hear the sound of a zipper on Josh's pants and candy box, waste-basket and garbage as an alternative percussion. As for the drums, they were recorded in a bathroom to make the sound tougher. You can also hear trombone and trumpet from Disneyland's Main Street Band taking part on the record -? guys find it funny that Mickey-Mouse orchestra make a porno background to a song about sex. "You Got A Killer Scene There, Man" which is definitely my favorite on this album, would be a good soundtrack to one of Tarantino's movies.

The album also got some help from Homme friends -- ZZ Top's Billy Gibbons adds spice to guitar sound through "Burn The Witch," while Garbage's Shirley Manson and the Distillers' Brody Dalle join Queens of the Stone Age with barely noticeable vocals on slinky "You Got A Killer Scene, Man." Even though Johannes and Castillo doesn't make that strong rhythm section as Grohl and Oliveri, I really love the drum parts of most of the song. The changing 4/4 to rhythm all through the album more obvious in some songs (like "Burn The Witch") and less obvious in others fits perfectly in the "haunting" in atmosphere of "Lullabies To Paralyze." // 10

Lyrics: They are as weird as the music is. It all depends on your personal associations. Have you ever had a boyfriend/girlfriend that said he/she loves you to death and told to fuck off the next minute? Then you'll love "Everybody Know That You're Insane." I'd love to sing to my ex-boyfriend. If I ever get a chance. Everything else is just as different, as your personal live experience is. The only song with an obvious meaning is probably "Skin On Skin." Well, you know what it's about.

Homme's vocals blend into the songs like another instrument. Different in every song and not annoying ?- you can notice it's presents just as much, so that it don't disturb you from the music. // 8

Overall Impression: The album was inspired by the sights of a huge desert not far from Los Angeles and it probably gave the record that mystical atmosphere. It would make an awesome background for a sect meeting with voodoo dolls as free merchandise. The best way to listen to it is to sit in a dark room all by yourself in headphones and see where your imagination would take you. It takes a few listens to appreciate the record, but once you got into, you just can't stop -- it has that strong feeling that makes you want to listen to it again and again and the more you listen to it, the more you like it. Though it's not all that good, comparing to previous albums and a few tracks feel a bit like fillers, it's a solid creation and you can hear the Queens' growing "adult" quality. The album rocks and it's definitely not the one soon forgotten. // 10

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overall: 10
Lullabies To Paralyze Reviewed by: Thepluginbaby, on march 23, 2005
2 of 2 people found this review helpful

Sound: QOTSA have always been about loud, brash, primal rock and roll. I view them as a modern day Led Zeppelin myself. Each part of the song, the vocals, the bass, the drums and the guitars compliment each other. They also employ other musical instruments, this very album contains a brass band, a flute, a Lap Steel and erm, cow bells (big ones and small ones). A second reason as to why I link them to Led Zep, is the mystisicm that surrounds the band and its music. This is most apparent in this particular album. Josh Homme, described the songs on this album as ones that you'd sing alone under a street lamp at night. The best way to listen to this album is alone in a dark room (preferably in sight of a full moon). The album begins with a whisper called 'This Lullaby', unlike previous Queens outings. This whisper is sung by Mark Lanegan, over hypnotic acoustic guitar, it is the prelude sung when the sun sets. Anyone expecting a loud moshathon akin to 'Feel Good Hit of the Summer' (Rated R) or 'Millionaire' (Songs For The Deaf) for an opener will be caught of guard. You needn't worry because this lullaby is very short and blossoms into a more recogniseable QOTSA fair with 'Medication'. This is why you love QOTSA, a primal bout of guitar bashing laced with Homme's vocals. You will notice a difference in Homme's voice, he is singing better than ever. The next song is bound to be a single and its just great. 'Everybody Knows That You Are Insane' starts with dreamy bottle neck guitar licks and is almost reminiscent of a Bond song. The song fades into the stratosphere before hitting you with an atom bomb with the chorus - the best chorus you'll hear this year. The song progresses with a kind of 'Go With The Flow' style, pounding and unrelentless. Next come Tangled Up In Plaid, which like the previous track takes a complete turnaround in the chorus. It starts off with a march style verse and evolves into a thunderous uproar of ravenous bliss. 'Burn The Witch' is unlike anything the Queens have done before, it has a blusey style, mostly due to a guest appearence from ZZ Topp's Billy Gibbons. It is a simple riff that is so dumb and catchy, it sounds exactly like a witch hunt basically. Next track 'In My Head' is another good one, again it has a relentless approach but is more of a sing along, one of the album's only radio friendly tracks I'd say. Next track is 'Little Sister' the first single, it's a great song with an uber cool solo at the end, but for some reason it sounds out of place on the album. Too short possibly, more akin to something you'd hear on an earlier album (but apparently the song's genesis was around the recording of Rated R). The next song is 'I Never Came', which is less of a moshing song, and is strangely relaxing with a slow hand solo. The next song has got to be the album's centerpiece - 'Someone's In The Wolf' this will be the most twisted thing you'll possibly hear this year. A seven minute opus of frantic razor sharp harmonising guitar shaped riffery. It will blow you away (and then melt you) different to anything they've ever done - it sounds like a fairy tale gone wrong (and if you see the video). The next song is 'This Blood Is Love', all people who brought the Little Sister single will have heard the remix. The original mix is way better and tyrannosaurus heavy. It is followed by the seedy 'Skin On Skin', where the guitar depreciates into a kind of sludgey bomb that will drown you should you merely hear about it. 'Broken Box' continues the seedy theme and is an above average song. The album's ensemble song comes next "You Got a Killer Scene There, Man..." Homme is the epitomy of rock and roll cool behind the mike here (smoking too). The next and last song is the 'Long Slow Goodbye' a toned down fitting end to an album of darkness. It ends with an orchestra and sounds both like sunrise and a funeral. This album sounds good. If you like your rawk raw and deep then welcome to a dark heaven. // 10

Lyrics: Josh Hommes voice has improved, his lyrics sound much the same, which is thoughtful, creepy, erotic and mangy (like a rabid dog). The lyrics convey the mystisism of the album. Homme is able to write a darn good chorus, playing live this will show, just listen to "Everybody Knows That Your Insane!". The best comes in "Someone's In The Wolf" the chorus begging us to 'Stay Forever' in the woods. There ain't no crappy emo on here, Homme clearly has a girlfriend (Brody Dalle) and is an experienced lyricist. // 10

Overall Impression: I'm a QOTSA fan. I was counting the days until this album's release and when it finally came I went out and got the deluxe edition which included an extra DVD containing studio footage, a mock interview and a masterfully disturbing video for 'Someone's In The Wolf', which includes the band running around a wood in wolf masks dancing with a hot dazed chick with knives. This album needs to be brought, for one the Queens need to eat! But mostly because its a provacative album, a moshing riot and a sublime journey into the man's heart of darkness (I thank you Joseph Conrad). 'Little Sister' is just the tip of the ice berg. Below the water is a huge mass of ice that ships are going to have to watch out for. The abscence of Nick Olivieri, is not felt, except for absence of his minute long shoutathons which are included in Rated R and Songs For The Deaf. Although the album does include Lanegan on one track (and a bonus track) this is Josh Homme's show all the way through. Songs for the Deaf was a Nevermind type album in that it was a commercial success and brought QOTSA to the alternative mainstream. With Lullabies to Paralyse, the band take a step back from where they were going and go for a walk in the dark forest. It has to be listened to, it is their most intelligent album. If I lost it, I'd buy it again and kill the one who stole it to the sound of 'Someone's In The Wolf'. I apologise but I'm going to have to give it a five. // 10

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overall: 10
Lullabies To Paralyze Reviewed by: benchiefjr, on march 23, 2005
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: The sound is kind of bluesy on occasions and the usual style of QOTSA others. I like it as much as Songs For The Deaf, although it's a little slow for my taste. The guitars are pretty good, along with the drums and the bass. Nick Oliveri is not on this CD, but I still like it as much as their old. // 10

Lyrics: The lyrics are very good, especially for a "Radio" band such as these guys. Most lyrics in this genre suck, or aren't that great. The lyrics are very off-the-wall and some have secret meanings. But these are very good. // 10

Overall Impression: Compared to their other albums, Lullabies To Paralyze holds up strongly. My favorite songs are Little Sister, I Never Came, Burn The Witch, and In My Head. I liked the singing and all the instruments, but I still think it was a little slow for my liking, but it's still great. If it were stolen I'd buy it again because it's a good album. By the way, I bought it first day. Overall, great album, must buy! // 10

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overall: 8.7
Lullabies To Paralyze Reviewed by: smb, on march 23, 2005
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: For those of you who live on the Moon, Queens Of The Stone Age are the world's best hard rock band at the moment. Lullabies To Paralyze is the fourth Queens album, recorded with key personnel Josh Homme (guitars, vocals, bass), Troy Van Leeuwen (guitars, lap-steel, vocals), Alain Johannes (bass, guitars, vocals) and Joey Castillo (drums). There's contributions from ZZ Top's Billy Gibbons (guitar), Mark Lanegan (vocals on Lullaby), Brody Dalle and Shirley Manson (backing vocals) and Eagles Of Death Metal frontman Jesse "The Devil" Everett Hughes (apparently he plays the flute). As you can see, this is a whole lot of instruments, and as such the album sounds really polished and well-produced (by Joe Baressi). If you like more garage style music with minimalist production, you probably won't like the sound of this. Joey Castillo (ex. Danzig) is certainly a skilled drummer, and Troy (A Perfect Circle, Enemy) is an amazing guitarist as anyone who saw the 2003 QOTSA tour will agree. Alain Johannes does a good job on bass, but you'll still find Queens and Kyuss fans mourning the loss of Nick Oliveri. Ignore them. Josh's great guitar sound and vocals carry this album. A lot of the earlier tracks are very radio-friendly sounding, which may put some people off. However, this soon makes way for cracking songs like the epic Someone's In The Wolf which starts off with a cracking riff liek we expect from QOTSA and descends into some weird distortion and effects making this song really listenable. You will be singing In My Head all day when you buy this record, even if you heard it on the last Desert Sessions. The bonus tracks are amazing, so make sure you get them. At the end of the album is a reminder of the finale to Rated R: a full brass section ends the album rather than the three hornists on the second Queens record. This to me shows how Queens have changed since then - there's more instruments, everything is smoothed and polished to perfection now. I give it a four simply because I'd like something faster in the middle, with less of a perfect sound. We all know Nick could have provided it, but apart from that the record can't be faulted. // 8

Lyrics: A lot of the lyrics here are about sex. Skin On Skin almost makes you cringe with Josh repeatedly singing (falsetto) "I wanna lick you so much." There are other themes too; Medication is fairly self explanatory while Burn the Witch echos the fairytale theme of the packaging. Mark's opening Lullaby is delivered in his characteristic gruff tones (the man practically lived on heroin, cigarettes and whisky for a decade, and it shows) while Josh uses his full vocal range like he never has before. Maybe having a bit more of Mark would have made for some nice variety (but then I do have four Mark Lanegan albums so I can live without) but the songs aren't let down by Josh's voice and poetic words. While I miss Nick screaming "You're gonna f--ing die!", those tracks were never the highlights of the previous records. // 8

Overall Impression: If you like the other Queens Of The Stone Age records, you won't dislike this. It's not as heavy, thrashy or garage-like as some fans might be hoping, but go listen to Mondo Generator if you miss Nick! If you know Kyuss (Homme and Oliveri's former band) this record is like. And the Circus Leaves Town To Songs for the Deaf's Welcome To Sky Valley. It's calmer, more mature. I think most hard rock fans will embrace this record and other bands will view it as a standard to aim for. So what are you waiting for? Go buy! // 10

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overall: 10
Lullabies To Paralyze Reviewed by: vantage4, on march 24, 2005
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Sound: This album has a good range to its sound. Some songs are steady rock, some are thrashers, and some are mellow. There's not too much of any one type of song on here, which is great. Overall, this album is a bit less loud than other qotsa albums, and has a subtly different style. However, it's still the Queens' own brand of rock, and impossible to confuse as anything else. The overall themes and sound are a bit more dark and lyrical. It has less to do with sex, drugs, and rock and roll and more to do with projecting a dark, timeless atmosphere. Josh's crunchy guitar sound isn't always as apparent as on past albums, but it's still there. The bass lines do a good job of helping to guide the songs rather than just following the guitar, which I was worried about when I heard that Nick had left. The drums, as usual, are very steady and also have plenty of key parts in the arrangements beyond use as a metronome. The Queens show once again how to build an arrangement in which no one sound overpowers the others, and every instrument adds something vital. // 10

Lyrics: Josh Homme has always had a cool, distinct voice, and this album definitely shows his vocal talent. He doesn't sound quite as nonchalant as in the past, and the vocal parts tend to be up higher. The lyrics are great as well. Not quite as nonsensical as they were on Songs for the Deaf, but still very cool. // 10

Overall Impression: This is a great album. If I seem a little underenthused, it's because I'm writing this at 11:30, but if someone stole my CD I would get a new one, find them, and dismember them with it before taking my original copy back. One thing that is a little noticeable is Nick's absence. There are no songs with screaming in them, and none of them bounce off the wall like they might if Nick was involved. All of the songs are a bit more methodical and laid back. Nick is a great counterpart for Josh, and when you really listen his absence is a bit more apparent. However, he'll probably be back for the next album, and Lullabies to Paralyze is still top notch stuff. If you have the means to pick it up, I highly recommend it. // 10

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overall: 10
Lullabies To Paralyze Reviewed by: Last To Fall, on march 25, 2005
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: After Song's For The Deaf, I had high expectations for this album. Those expectations were met immediatly upon listening. Every song is great and there is an amazing atmosphere that is created from the first song and lasts until the end. The album is for the most part darker than the band's previous efforts and the credit there is due to Josh Homme. His guitar riffs soar throughout the entire album, carrying his melodies beautifully. The sound is much more complex than anything they've done in the past, ranging from bluesy hard-rock ("Burn The Witch" and "You've Got A Killer Scene There, Man...") to soft melodic pieces ("The Long Slow Goodbye" and "I Never Came"). All of which are pulled off exceptionally well. // 10

Lyrics: Josh Homme's lyrics have always been very dark and they certainly make you think. This album is no exception. His vocals create the perfect mood along with the lyrics which is a high point on this album. Perhaps the most impressive talent of Homme's is his unique ability to create amazingly creative and gripping melodies simple chord progressions. // 10

Overall Impression: Overall I believe this to be the bands most innovative and exciting album. Of course I would recommend anything by this group, but Lullabies To Paralyze takes it a step further. My favorite songs would have to be "Tangled Up In Plaid" (remminiscent of "No One Knows", yet unique) and "You've Got A Killer Scene There, Man..." (one of the best lead guitar parts I've heard in years), although every song deserves credit. Buy this album and you won't regret it. // 10

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overall: 8.7
Lullabies To Paralyze Reviewed by: the_cheat22, on april 16, 2005
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Sound: This CD contains that classic Queens Of The Stone Age sound but with a few changes. The drumming and bass I find more dull, what with the new band members I think, but are still solid in this album (there are still many bass fills and drum rolls might I say). The guitar and vocals are still unchanged, still the same distortions, the same whispering back-up vocals that add to that classic Queens Of The Stone Age sound that I've enjoyed in the past. The solo for the track "Little Sister" is very cool, and has a very unique sound to it. // 10

Lyrics: The lyrics are pretty good. They add to the theme of "Lullaby" in many songs. In some songs, they are good but I find them to be somewhat repetitive. Still, the lyrics are usefull in setting the atmosphere of the CD, and the ones that don't are still pretty cool, The music often adds to this aswell, creating a good mix of music and vocals. Yet, the main vocals are somewhat not loud enough compared to the band (Joshua Homme does have a great voice, they could have turned up the volume a little when recording him). // 8

Overall Impression: Queens Of The Stone Age made this album with the obvious theme of a scary lullaby with songs titled "Burn The Witch" and "Someone's In The Wolf" (my personal favorites), not to mention the first track "This Lullaby" which I don't really like (it sounds like a lullaby), but greatly adds to the main theme of the CD. The CD is great played from start to end. I don't skip any songs. With creepy sounds and whispers added, the songs are definitely Lullabies To Parralyze! // 8

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overall: 8
Lullabies To Paralyze Reviewed by: americanmovie23, on september 05, 2005
0 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sound: The sound is lacking from "Songs For The Deaf." The bass isn't as prevalent. But you have to look at it from the fact that the band has changed. So the sound has to change too. It's basically "Queens Of The Josh Homme Experience." The guitars are very muddy. The vocals are very distorted, and the drums are very light. But then again the band has changed so the sound has to. // 8

Lyrics: The lyrics are very strange and very typical QOTSA. Especially in "Everybody Knows That You Are Insane" and "Someone's In The Wolf." But this album does have its bright moments in teh lyrics. "I Never Came" and "Long Slow Goodbye" are some of the best songs QOTSA have ever made. Good job. // 8

Overall Impression: While it doesn't break any musical barriers, it is a very good standard barrier for stoner grunge rock. It really does show some maturity on the side of Homme. This is a good step in the right direction. The next album has so much promise. // 8

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overall: 8.7
Lullabies To Paralyze Reviewed by: duncang, on november 18, 2005
0 of 2 people found this review helpful

Sound: The standout songs are normal Queens fare, but this is a long album, so there are a few very different songs. Josh Homme is a good guitarist and singer, but the band still arent quite the same without Nick, although the new bass player is just as good, there isnt the same danger to QOTSA without him, but this album is sounding raw, and great. // 9

Lyrics: I love these lyrics, a lot are darker than previous efforts, like the music actually. // 9

Overall Impression: This Lullaby (3/10), acoustic opener, with an irritating guitar, and an annoying singer trying to make something folk and country-like. Pretty damn bad, until you hear those drum sticks opening Medication (8), catchy Go With The Flow-like feel, which reassures you after the 1st track that this is still a QOTSA album. Everybody Knows Your Insane (10) is a song that has a very epic feel to it. Similar to Soundgarden's Black Hole Sun until the chorus, which is classic Queens, it sounds like it should have Dave Grohl behind that kit, which is certainly a good thing. This album isnt brilliantly produced but the raw sound of it compliments Joshes guitar playing, which in turn helps Tangled Up In Plaid (8) fuse itself into your head, that song is also stupidly catchy, with a simple-but-infectious guitar, and hop-along drum beat. I had heard from friends what the best songs are, and Burn The Witch (10) was one of them on almost everyones list, and they were right. I love the lyrics too, quite a progression from Feel Good Hit Of The Summer I must say myself. The next song I think should win a competition for "best named song ever," because In My Head (10) goes exactly where it says on the tin. Homme's voice in the verse sounds spooky, and if you listen to it too loud, it gives you a headache, listen to it yourself and you'll see what I mean, but it is brilliant. First single Little Sister (10) blows EKTYI, BTW, TUIP and IMH out of your head immediately, and threatens to take up immediate residence, this song is the best Queens song since No One Knows. I Never Came (9) is the wrong song to follow up to a masterpiece like Little Sister, because really, no Queens song is a good song to follow up to Little Sister. Putting it last would have helped. But I Never Came is a good song, simple but effective, the chorus and verse show how good QOTSA are at varying from their following, and still making brilliant songs. Someones In The Wolf (7) is longer than In My Head and Little Sister put together, and it is here that this album begins to lose your attention a bit, your just hoping for something to spark off again, The Blood Is Love (7) is no different, although it is a bit more lively than.. The Wolf, it just needs something like the chorus of Everybody Knows Your Insane, or the fast break in No One Knows. The song freezes for a milli-second and comes back with something that promises a bit more, but it still doesnt re-kinder the kind of brilliance the earlier parts of the album had. Skin On Skin (8) is an improvement on the last two songs, but still isnt what your waiting for. Josh's voice is really annoying in this song, and the guitar doesnt sound top-class either, but this is still better than SITW and TBIL because it is just written better. Will it ever spark off again? Yes! Broken Box (9) is sweet relief from the past 3 songs, it doesn't pack as much punch as Go With The Flow, but it definitely gets you back into the album. "You Got A Killer Scence There, Man" (5), god, who mixed this thing? Putting all the exciting songs at the beginning was stupid. This song is boring, it doesn't even have a scene, let alone a killer one. Long Slow Goodbye (9)? Jesus! Don't call a song that on an album like this! When I looked at the back to see what this song was called, I was extremely tempted to press the skip button, but it sounded quite lively, so I thought I might have a listen. The end of it goes on for too long, and there is a hidden track, which is just some random orchesta playing something which sounds like you should be watching Pirates Of The Carribean or something. The two bonus tracks, Like A Drug (7) and Precious And Grace (10) are quite different. Like A Drug follows the same boring path of most of the album, and Precious And Grace is just great. It doesnt have Josh singing, which is a good thing for this particular song, cause his voice wouldnt go with it I don't think. It has a particularly catchy solo as well. Overall, there are only two genuinely bad songs (This Lullaby and "You've Got A Killer Scene There, Man"), where as the rest are either things of pure brilliance or average, dark and remotely catchy songs, which are ultimately fillers, although enjoyable fillers. If I were whoever mixed this, then I would cut out some songs, becuase it is a long album. That would make a 10 out of 10 album, but this is way more boring than this, so I think it gets an 8 from me. // 8

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overall: 7.7
Lullabies To Paralyze Reviewed by: aMeRiCaNsTrAt21, on january 05, 2006
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: After Song's For The Deaf, I had high expectations for this album. Those expectations were met immediatly upon listening. Every song is great and there is an amazing atmosphere that is created from the first song and lasts until the end. The album is for the most part darker than the band's previous efforts and the credit there is due to Josh Homme. His guitar riffs soar throughout the entire album, carrying his melodies beautifully. The sound is much more complex than anything they've done in the past, ranging from bluesy hard-rock ("Burn The Witch" and "You've Got A Killer Scene There, Man...") to soft melodic pieces ("The Long Slow Goodbye" and "I Never Came"). All of which are pulled off exceptionally well. // 8

Lyrics: A lot of the lyrics here are about sex. Skin On Skin almost makes you cringe with Josh repeatedly singing (falsetto) "I wanna lick you so much." There are other themes too; Medication is fairly self explanatory while Burn the Witch echos the fairytale theme of the packaging. Mark's opening Lullaby is delivered in his characteristic gruff tones (the man practically lived on heroin, cigarettes and whisky for a decade, and it shows) while Josh uses his full vocal range like he never has before. Maybe having a bit more of Mark would have made for some nice variety (but then I do have four Mark Lanegan albums so I can live without) but the songs aren't let down by Josh's voice and poetic words. While I miss Nick screaming "You're gonna f--king die!", those tracks were never the highlights of the previous records. // 8

Overall Impression: Queens Of The Stone Age made this album with the obvious theme of a scary lullaby with songs titled "Burn The Witch" and "Someone's In The Wolf" (my personal favorites), not to mention the first track "This Lullaby" which I don't really like (it sounds like a lullaby), but greatly adds to the main theme of the CD. The CD is great played from start to end. I don't skip any songs. With creepy sounds and whispers added, the songs are definitely Lullabies To Parralyze! // 7

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overall: 8.7
Lullabies To Paralyze Reviewed by: thunderstruck56, on august 14, 2007
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: With the departure of Bassist Nick Oliveri, and legendary drummer David Grohl, killer guitarist Dean Ween. I was not expecting this album to be as raw and loud as Songs for the Deaf, and, I was right. The new queens of the stone age is a softer mellower band. No more crazy mexican radio show outros or crazy onstage personas. What I wasn't expecting was, for this album to actually be amazing. There sound has matured into something they were looking for way back on R. They know how to make a 7 minute epic song, and the pulsing short song. This is a experimental sound. It's rough, and at times, incredibly repetitive, but it is a new sound. // 8

Lyrics: Josh Homme is the only thing apparently present on this album, that was a part of the old Queens of the stone age. His voice is awesome. And it fits the music. Something most current rock vocalists can't seem to do is blend a voice into the music. Most people will complain they can't understand his voice on the album, and at times I can agree with them, but that's part of the band. Josh's voice blends into the sonic template that he has set in front of them. // 10

Overall Impression: I could review each song individually, but what struck me, is there is no apparent single on this album. It flows as a unit. The worst song on the album however, is "Little Sister", the single. It sounds like a I'll faded attempt to replicate the success of No One Knows. And it doesn't fit with the general sound of the album. This is Not the greatest release from the boys, but who was actually expecting it to be better than songs for the deaf? It is a different sound. It take a few listens to appreciate the finer things on the album. Josh Homme knows how to craft a song, and now he is free to experiment with his music. The way I see it, they could basically do anything with their music after this. Heck, they could make a Kyuss-eque record, and it would be amazing. Queens of the stone age is one of the greatestet modern progressive rock bands out there, and I cannot wat to hear what they can come up with next. // 8

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overall: 8.3
Lullabies To Paralyze Reviewed by: LAWRENCE_FA, on january 10, 2008
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Sound: The music in this is superb. It is symptomatic of Josh Homme's inate ability to create a really good guitar riff, good timings and riffs. The album opens up with a nice acoustic number, to me personally remeniscent of Tom Waits, with Homme displaying a versetality I have not hithero experienced. The album speeds up from there, with "Medication", a fast paced typical QOTSA song, with typical trippy guitar that can makes the head bang and the feet stomp. The album then takes an awesome twist, starting with the song "Everybody Knows That You Are Insane", an insanely trippy number, that starts slowly, with bendy, crazy guitar, before climaxing at the chorus with a catchy, headbanging hook. Typical QOTSA. They then go into their hit; "Burn The Witch". This is so symptomatic of Homme's style of writing songs; a catchy, well thought out riff. "Tangled Up In Plaid" is more of the same, very catchy and equally as trippy as the rest. A very good album, with the brilliant bonus tracks a cherry on the veritable sundae that is Lullabies To Paralyze. // 9

Lyrics: Josh Homme is a versatile, brilliant singer, as he has always proved. His lyrics always do avoid the very typical cliches that bands like Aiden seem intent on wearing out. But if I have one complaint, it is that the lyrics never seem particularly soulful. He hits the right notes, but I never get the impression he is passionate about what he is saying, however apart from that, Homme puts in an excellent vocal performance. // 7

Overall Impression: I love this album, because it is timeless. With a band like Gallows, there is a time you are not in the mood to listen to it. Such as, a social event. But stick this album on in the car, in your room, at a social event, to your parents, anywhere, it will surelyhit the spot. It is very trippy, but not in the sixties styles of Hendrix or Gong. Homme has created a new style of stoner rock, in QOTSA and Kyuss and he showcases it fantastically. // 9

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overall: 9.3
Lullabies To Paralyze Reviewed by: AndrewP, on june 11, 2008
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Sound: In this album the band is sounding very cool(even without Nick Olivieri) and you can feel quite a differnece in this album because almost all the members of the group have changed since the last album.(like always). It has pretty distinct tracks, what make me feel like they don't fit in the same album, but who cares? They are all great songs! I just didn't get why such a creative musician like Josh Homme does so repetitive songs! // 9

Lyrics: The lyrics in this album are very distinct, as the sound, you can notice if you listen ''Burn The Witch'' and compare with ''Little Sister'' you will notice that they are very different even if you look in the deeper inspiration for the lyrics, but the good part is that all the lyrics fit perfectly with the songs. // 10

Overall Impression: Comparing to the others QOTSA albums, I think this one is the best of them all because they made a very good and original sound, like always, but improved.About the songs, my personal favorites are ''burn the witch''(never heard anything alike), ''Little Sister''and '' medication''(never something so simple was so cool). The only thing I don't like in this album is that could be better finished(just my personal opinion, ok? ). And that clich ''If it were stolen, I would buy it again.'' I will answer in a different way: This baby was never gonna be stolen because I would protect it with my life! And I will never lose this album, because I take it with me anywhere I go! (seriously!) // 9

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