Kid A Review

artist: radiohead date: 10/03/2011 category: compact discs
radiohead: Kid A
Released: Oct 3, 2000
Genre: Rock
Styles: Alternative Pop/Rock, Experimental Rock, Indie Electronic
Number Of Tracks: 10
Kid A is the most successful electronica album from a rock band.
 Sound: 9.5
 Lyrics: 9.2
 Overall Impression: 9.2
 Overall rating:
 9.4 
 Reviewer rating:
 9.3 
 Users rating:
 9.5 
 Votes:
 111 
reviews (13) 17 comments vote for this album:
overall: 10
Kid A Reviewed by: SethMegadefan, on april 26, 2005
5 of 7 people found this review helpful

Sound: Attention all OK Computer lovers: there's more to Radiohead than just that album. And their 1999 followup album proves just that. To a lot of people (OK Computer lovers, mainly), Kid A was Radiohead's "turning point"; it is where they started going downhill. Well, anybody who thinks that is only saying that because they care more about the guitars and drum loops than the actual music itself. If we're tackling this from a musical perspective, the album is brilliant, and probably one of Radiohead's best. Sure, I'll admit that the songs were really weird to me at first, and I almost cast it aside, but I decided that being narrow-minded and ignorant about it wasn't going to help. So I listened to it; actually listened. And it's great. Right from the start you can tell that the album is going to be great. With the synth opening up "Everything In Its Right Place" and the backwards opening vocals, you can tell already that you're not going to get anymore "Paranoid Android" like riffs. But don't be a Radiohead fan because of OK Computer, be a Radiohead fan because of Radiohead. This album, in a nutshell, is a work or sheer brilliance. // 10

Lyrics: Okay, for the most part the true lyrics on this album are hidden behind voice distortion and, for the opener, backwards vocals. However, whatever lyrics that are there are, as usual, astonishing. Most people have a hard time understanding what they really mean and think that it's just jibberish and, at times, a joke, which it can be. But the truth is that Radiohead isn't going to serve you straight-up, get-to-the-point lyrics; that's for no-brainers who don't like to "think" about their music. "Cut the kids in half" a line from "Morning Bell." Now, do you honestly think that he's talking about cutting some kids in half? My god, you people, open up your minds a little and actually think! // 10

Overall Impression: Another flawless work by one of the greatest bands ever. I don't care if they changed their style, I'm still buying their new album. The fact that they are brilliant musicians is often tossed aside by today's mainstream society that would rather hear some four-powerchord repetitious single by Good Charlotte than actually give real music a chance. For those of you who would choose Good Charlotte, I pity you. For those of you on Radiohead's side no matter how techno their music is, congratulations; you're a real music fan. // 10

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overall: 8.7
Kid A Reviewed by: gallagher2006, on march 31, 2006
3 of 5 people found this review helpful

Sound: Where do I start? If you listened to any other '90s Radiohead you will see a huge difference. Instead of the usual guitar fueled rock of the 3 albums before, they have now opted for a more electronic and keyboard fueled aproach. Kid A is not a bad album! Just missunderstood. Radiohead were tired of making the same music, so they changed and adapted. "Idioteque" and "Everything In Its Right Place" are the stand out tracks, listen to these and you will get the overall "Feel" of the album. // 10

Lyrics: As you may not know, this was a point in Radiohead's career when Thom Yorke decided that he wanted to take the pressure off the lyrics, and due to this, the keyboards and drums are turned way up, with vocals way down. Because of this, the actual lyrics suffer. Songs "Kid A" and "Optimistic" seem to make no sense at all. But, The one track actually does have a good sense of lyrics when you consider that Thom is obsessed with the gulf war "Idioteque." // 7

Overall Impression: Overall, I believe this to be a good album. As with every album, it has its high points and its low points. If you are a fan Of "Amnesiac," I recomend this album, as it seems simply a better version of it. If you prefer the Guitar fueled rock, buy "Hail To The Theif" or "Pablo Honey." // 9

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overall: 10
Kid A Reviewed by: Mace_37, on march 15, 2005
2 of 3 people found this review helpful

Sound: The music on Kid A is for the most part, very relaxing and electronic. The album has a whale music type vibe. Most of the songs are quite slow and mellow with songs like Kid A sounding like they have some sort of childrens toy playing in the background. For the most part the album is about the base; with songs like Kid A and National Anthem having base lines that you blow you away. Other songs like Optimistic have a Radiohead type vibe with the rock sound but with a similar vibe that allows it to fit in with the rest of the album. If you like Sigur Ros or any type of electronica and want a mellow relaxing album that sounds great, I suggest that you get Kid A. // 10

Lyrics: For the most part the songs don't have very many lyrics. Songs like Kid A have around 5 lines of lyrics throughout the entire song and seem as if there were anymore it would take away from the song. The more rockish songs on the album like Optimistic are full of lyrics that are quite good. For the most part the lyrics are so few and far between that they are entangled in metaphors that make the song sound different after 20 listens. Amazing sounds on the lyrics too with songs like In Limbo where the lyrics sound electronic and it completely fit the song as if it is being sucked down a drain. // 10

Overall Impression: I got the album as a gift, I wasn't really a big Radio Head fan and my first few listens to the album I didn't really care for. After that I was enveloped by what is Kid A and listen to the album more than any other one that I own. It is completely different from what you would expect from anything that you would hear on the radio. Probably why their most rock sounding song, Optimistic, was their single. The most impressive song on the Album is National Anthem. The song contains a small orchestra that by the end are all playing completely different stuff. The song is either love it or hate it based on how different it sounds from any other song on the album. The album is great for long trips as it will easily help you fall asleep but is sadly shy of 50 minutes long. If the album were lost or stolen I'd buy it the next day, maybe even two copies just incase it happened again. But the album sounds nothing like what you'd expect from Radiohead, be forewarned. // 10

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overall: 8
Kid A Reviewed by: stellar_legs, on january 08, 2004
1 of 3 people found this review helpful

Sound: The title of Radiohead's 4th album is one of irony. Nothing on this album is in it's right place at all. Radiohead are a rock band. And like most rock bands, there going to have something you can latch onto right off the bat. Those expecting that kind of playability are driving down the wrong highway. I suggest going back and taking the curvy road, because that's what's in store for you. Electronic textures abound on this record, with computer-like squiggles that sound like geeks sitting alone in there room playing with there toys. Where the hell are the guitars? Radiohead are a rock band remember? Still, this is defenitly a product of it's moment, and a pure act of obsession on Radiohead's behalf. But there's still alot to sink your teeth into. Consider the crusty, space-funk of "the National Anthem" which, before you know it, transforms into what sounds like a jazz orchestra falling off of a cliff. Then there's the faint, whisper-quiet acoustics of "How To Dissapear Completely" which lulls you in, and hooks you, line and sinker. And sometimes, Radiohead just go out of the way to deliver straight up, sleekly polished techno, like on Ideoteque, which sounds as if it's wrapped in a layer of chrome. Only one song makes full use of Radiohead as a whole band (the rough, almost There There-ish "Optimistic"). All expectations are thrown out of the window, and guitarists will more then likely toss this album aside. But stick with it, and these songs will get through if you let them. // 8

Lyrics: Kid A comes without a lyrics sheet. And half the time, you won't understand what Thom Yorke is mumbling to himself. It's as if his words come from his mouth, split into several parts, and fight to the death. There's no clarity here. No easy enjoyability. Just a man alone with his words and thoughts. Who knows what he's singing about on "Everything in It's Right Place." Maybe a bad night out ("yesterday I woke up sucking on a lemon," sinsg Yorke, "There are two colors in my head."). He isn't telling, and your less then likely to find out. As anti-establishment as Ok Computer was, Kid A seems to seperate Radiohead into there own world, free of rules and care ("Big fish eat the little ones," sings Yorke on Optimistic, "that's not my problem"). // 8

Overall Impression: Basically, Kid A is powerful enough to devide it's listeners into 2 camps: the ones who will dispose of the album the first listen, due to the fact that it ignores the standard of what a "Pop" album should be, and those who find it to be a life-altering statement, freeing it's listeners from the chains of modern music. Me, I'm undecided. I'm leaning more towards the 2nd camp. Kid A is definately something special. How special depends on the listener. // 8

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overall: 10
Kid A Reviewed by: Amnesiac1234, on april 09, 2010
1 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sound: The first word that pops out of my mouth is "AMAZING!" This album is the first album I ever bought and I have to say well money spent. The sound on this album is such a beautiful and haunting sound at the same time. From the hard bass-riff in "The National Anthem" to the beautiful organ in "Motion Picture Soundtrack" (Weird to think that this was written at the same time as "Creep")I would call this album a Electronica / Experimental Rock sounded album. // 10

Lyrics: This is at the time where Thom Yorke suffered writing-block and the band suffered a mass of unproductivity. The lyric a very good and make people think. Thom wanted to use his voice as a instrument and that was a good decision to make. In all of my reviews I have said that Thom Yorke is an amazing singer, but this album is proof. // 10

Overall Impression: This album doesnt't compare with any of their album yet ever made. "Kid A" is such a masterpiece and a very experimental album! The most impressive songs on the album for me is "ALL OF THEM!". All the songs on this album are excellent, you don't get tired of their songs! I love that its quite addictive and that they dare to do such a album. I have two "Kid A" The first I bought and another one I bought a year ago just because I'm afraid to lose it. // 10

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overall: 9.3
Kid A Reviewed by: Trifonas, on october 03, 2011
1 of 2 people found this review helpful

Sound: After the big "OK Computer" no one knew what would be Radiohead's next record like. It promotes a very alternative style, very different than the last CD. Personally after a few minutes I was terrified. The styles are alternative and jazz rock and electronica. It can be described as the music of the new millenium, pop after pop. Also guitar is almost gone from this record. Also Jonny Greenwood's "Ondes Martenot" is very noticable I many songs. Some songs exist since 1997 or 1998 and the production is magnificent. // 9

Lyrics: The lyrics are scary. After the continuous repeat of "Everything... Everything..." in "Everything In Its Right Place" comes the Computer voice of "Kid A" and the continuous "Everyone... Everyone around here..." of "The National Anthem". Thom Yorke sings wonderfully with his trademark falsetto and his high range voice. The next song "How To Disappear Completely" is a masterpiece, however many would think it's boring. In my opinion is the best song of the album. "Treefingers" is the surprise of the record. A 6 min instrumental, only Ed O'Brien's guitar. "Optimistic" is the public's favourite song. "In Limbo" is very strange and then comes "Idioteque" an amazing song. "Morning Bell" talks about divorce and the last song "Motion Picture Soundtrack" is Thom's favourite. Also it has very good lyrics. // 10

Overall Impression: It's the best album in 2000 in my opinion and the songs "Everything In Its Right Place", "How To Disappear Completely" and "Idioteque" will remain in history. Also I think that it is very progressive, even for 2000 and that it has influenced a great range of artists. I got the collector's edition and it has an amazing artwork that represents the record's music in paintings and it has also a second CD with live recording. If I lost it I would buy it again immediately! // 9

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overall: 9.3
Kid A Reviewed by: unregistered, on june 13, 2005
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: This album was a risky move. After Radiohead released the outstanding LP OK Computer in 1997, all the fans had high expectations to what would come next. And "Kid A" came next. This electronically heavy record was not what anyone had expected. It seemed that RH had changed their way of looking at their music, from "anyone can play guitar" to "who needs to play guitar anyway?" Sure, they did throw away the guitars in this album - but it worked! From the sythesized first track "Everything In It's Right Place" to the last "Motion Picture Soundtrack," it worked. Radiohead still seems to keep me interested, with little guitar. The most shocking track on the CD is probably "Idioteque." With a dance theme to it, a drum machine is used throughout the whole song. However, this "shock" is probably one of the best tracks on the CD in my opinion. I think it is one of those love/hate songs. // 10

Lyrics: Yes, much of the singing is quite distorted and hard to make out. However, the lyrics are still great and at radiohead standard. I have to say the lyrics have become more strange, and harder to see through than before. A lot of the time the lyrics are hard to understand. The lyrics are full of metaphorical phrases. // 10

Overall Impression: Overall, Kid A is a great album. For those who are used to listening to old RH, it takes a while to get used to. But when you do, it is an astonishing album. However, I do prefer OK Computer and the bends, as it is a bit too heavy on the techo side of music. // 8

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overall: 9.3
Kid A Reviewed by: unregistered, on december 07, 2005
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: I had heard a bit about Radiohead before, but never really bothered seriously listening to their music. After hearing "High And Dry" off of The Bends, I decided to check out their music more seriously. Kid A was pretty much a random alblum choice, and was I surprised when I heard it. Absolutley nothing like the guitar driven "Bends" but still brilliant, even from a guitarists point of view. I remember being sucked in from the moment I heard the keys on "Everything In Its Right Place" on the car ride home from the store to the fiftieth time I listened to the whole alblum all the way through while just chilling out and thinking. Be forewarned, there is very little guitar work on this alblum, but that doesnt at all mean it cant inspire and impress a guitarist. Radioheads brilliant combanation of electronica and rock/alternative sheds light on an unseen genre landscape, similar to the haunting alblum insert drawings. Drums, whether acoustic or electronic are powerful and ever-changing, hardly ever a continuous loop. And as many have mentioned before, the bass is excellent and often overlooked, driving many of the songs home. // 9

Lyrics: Lyrics were excellently fitting to the desolate landscape described by the music, very random and paranoid. If you are used to straight-up lyrics that make perfect sense, give this a spin, it will change the way you look at lyric-writing. Radiohead makes brilliant use of repeating lines of verse and creating brilliance without rhyme or "punch lines". Thom, while not having the greatest voice, makes brilliant use of it anyway, especially noticable on "Idioteque" where the gasps between lines drive the maddening tune along. // 10

Overall Impression: Overall, this alblum has had suprisingly one of the largest influences on my approach to writing music. From the 6/4 time signatures featured on "In Limbo" and "Everything In Its Right Place" to minimalist vocals and drums on "Idioteque" to free-jazz insanity on "The National Anthem," there is something for everyone. If this were stolen, I would crucify the stealer and then bury him in a tomb from which he would arise in three days or so. Then I would make him pay for another one in addition to the rest of Radiohead's alblums. // 9

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overall: 8.3
Kid A Reviewed by: tommybear, on january 04, 2006
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: Soundwise, this is a lot more electronicaly influenced than OK Computer. Personally, I've grown to really like this album. Everything in its Right Place, Kid A, The National Anthem, Idioteque, Morning Bell and Motion Picture Soundtrack are all great songs. I heard Thom wanted to include the latter on OkC but I'm glad they didn't because I think its much more suited to the musical stylings of this album. By far the best song is the acoustic How to Diasappear Completely. This is a beautiful song with superb lyrics. The other 3 tracks, Treefingers, Optimistic and In Limbo are ok. There are a lot of great riffs on this album, however, there are some annoying flaws. Its often hard to understand what Thom is singing because his voice is so distorted, and for some reason they forgot to include a lyrics book, which is unforgivable. I would recommend going online to get the lyrics, because they're actually quite interesting. Overall though, its a solid and unique effort. // 8

Lyrics: I would say that the lyrics are even more weird on this LP. However they are certainly thought-provoking. I especially like the lyrics on HTDC ("There there. That's not me") and the National Anthem ("It's holding on. It's holding on"), but they're all excellent. Thom's voice has a lot of special effects mixed in but there's no doubting his skill. Again I mention it over and over, but I would say the best vocal song is HTDC. // 9

Overall Impression: Compared to their other albums, I would say that it is worse than the Bends and Ok Computer, better than Pablo Honey, and roughly the same as Amnesiac and Hail to the Thief. Its a pretty consistent album quality-wise, and it flows together nicely. My favourites would be HTDC and Idioteque, which is virtually a dance record. Also the album sleeve rocks. If it were lost, I would definately buy it again, even though it's already on my iPod. For anyone who's wary of trying it out, I would certainly recommend it. It's a pretty experimental album, but there's plenty of the old Radiohead you know and love in there. A pleasant surprise. // 8

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overall: 10
Kid A Reviewed by: Godzilla1969, on april 19, 2006
0 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sound: After 1995's phenomenal "The Bends," and 1997's wildly successsful "OK Computer," Radiohead once again holed up in the studio, this time reinventing themselves so they could later burst out into the music scene again as a completely different band. When they released "Kid A" in 2000, Radiohead turned from a U2 fledgling to an electronic, cerebral, even more revolutionary music monster. // 10

Lyrics: Though the lyrics often seem simple or senseless on the surface, you can find the true meaning of the poetry by analyzing it line by line. For example, in "Everything In Its Right Place," Thom Yorke sings the line, "Everything in its right place" from the point of view of a scientist who has overseen the successful human cloning of "Kid A" a character that the whole album follws. As always, Thom Yorke's delicate, stunning voice complies beautifully with the electronic, strange musical backdrop. Thom Yorke nails every note effortlessy, and he is a very important aspect of his band's music. // 10

Overall Impression: Kid A not only compares with Radiohead's other albums, it out-does them with its innovative, electronic approach to modern music. Although their past albums and the albums made after Kid A are respectable in their own rights, this album is a whole different experience. My personal favorites off this album are "Everything In Its Right Place," "The National Anthem," "Optimistic" and "In Limbo." Most certainly one of my favorite albums of all time. // 10

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overall: 9.3
Kid A Reviewed by: Root Beer, on january 28, 2008
0 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sound: In the year 2000, Radiohead ditched it's former "guitar-rock" sound for a more "Pink Floyd goes electronica" sound. The result is Kid A. While I liked their older albums (particularly OK Computer), I never really considered them a musical phenomenon until I listened to this album. Radiohead have created a sonic world. You can't listen to it while you're playing video games or doing homework. You can't listen to it while you're doing anything. All you can do is listen and think, think and listen. It will take you to a very cold, bleak world, but you want to keep listening no matter how cold or bleak it is. Also, do not put this album on shuffle on your iPod! It is meant to be listened to straight through, tracks 1-10! Do this, and you'll completely ruin the effect. Many people don't like this album because it sounds almost nothing like their older stuff. This isn't particularly true, as Radiohead has always had that same defining, undescribable feel to it. This is not lost in Kid A. I would give this album a song-by-song review, but I don't want to spoil anything, and it's not meant to be picked apart, but listened to as a whole. // 10

Lyrics: While the music is fantastic, the lyrics are somewhat more lacking. They just don't always make sense. This can be a good thing sometimes, because it leaves the song open to interpretation, but this is a little overdone in my opinion. Some examples of this are "Kid A", "The National Anthem", "In Limbo", and "Idioteque". For some songs, though, like "Everything in it's Right Place", the lyrics not making any sense is a little more fitting to the music. "Motion Picture Soundtrack", on the other hand, has some great lyrics (especially the last line of "I'll see you in the next life"). While the lyrics don't always make sense, Kid A seems to be a concept album, as it does seem to tell some kind of story. But the exact story may be a little hard to follow. Thom Yorke is still a great vocalist, however, and although his singing doesn't make much of an appearance here, the talent is still visible. // 8

Overall Impression: Overall, Radiohead has come up with something completely unlike anything else on the market today. It is one of those albums where every time you listen to it, you notice something new. The thread of Kid A is a fragile one, and you can only truly understand it if you listen to it the way it was meant to be listened to. I firmly believe that this is Radiohead's best album to date. If it were stolen or lost, I'd definitely buy it again. So go out and buy it if you haven't already, wait until nighttime, put the CD in your highest-quality speaker system, hit play, get comfy on your bed or couch, pull out the liner booklet, and enjoy the ride. // 10

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overall: 9.3
Kid A Reviewed by: connell21, on december 02, 2008
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: Radioheads Kid A album was a massive leap in style for the band. Former albums by radiohead were more guitar influenced like their classics, the bends and ok computer. 1997's Ok computer was radioheads masterpiece that earned them imense success worldwide, so when 2000 rolled by and radiohead released kid a, the anticipation was palpable. The sound from the album was completely different, driven by electronica, jazzy elements and other progressive elements. Thom Yorke, the bands lead songwriter claims he had writers block caused by his severe depression after the touring for ok computer, and he began to listen to electronic bands like aphex twins and others. Out of this the band spent over a year mixng elements including classicalinstruments like brass instruments and jonny greenwoods favoured ondes mardenot, and various synths and simulators. Out of all this I believe that radiohead have created an amazingly unique sound that fuels the idea that they are one of the only bands who arnt afraid to try anything and attempt to bush the boundries of western music. Songs like everything in it's right place, the national anthem and ideotique sound amazing and are truely innovotive, motion picture soundtrack (though it pointlessly has 4 minutes of silence) is a beautifal song and one of the surprises of the album. I think the sound radiohead have created for this album was brave as it might have alienated their earlier fans but I think they have pulled it off. // 10

Lyrics: The lyrics for this album are hauntingly brilliant. Thom Yorke is reknowed for being one of the 90's best songwriters and he pulls out all the stops here. Kid A the title track of the album is amazingly sung and the subject matter is horridly tragic, ideotique and the national anthem display radioheads plitical side, everything in it's right place is just beautifally sung as is motion picture soundtrack. Thom Yorke is as usual a brillian singer, is falsetto is right at home with his scat singing and his lyrics are as good as his vocals. The lyrics suit the music beautifally. As does Thom Yorkes voice. // 9

Overall Impression: Kid a was the herald for a new genertaion in radioheads evolution, and it is far more then just a stopgap, I hold this up there with my favourite albums, as soon as I heard the national anthem I knew I must have it, what a bargain finding it for 5. I think the best song of the album is the national anthem it just really tugs me in with that powerfull bass line and the irrelevent trumpet solo adds to it's genius, my only criticsm is that as a guitarist I would have loved for jonny greenwood's uniquley briiliant style to have had more time to shine but I suppose you can't have evrything. A great album you simply must buy it I couldent go without and neither should you. // 9

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overall: 9
Kid A Reviewed by: thewho65, on march 03, 2009
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: Kid A, released in 2000 after getting over the growing pains of OK Computer, is an album unlike any other of their contemporaries. No videos were made, no singles distributed. Absolutely no press or touring. Yet it was released at #1 here in America. Early demo leaks on the internet had partly to do with that, but one reason is that sonically it seems like a whole other band on this record. The employment of electronics angered some of the guitar-rock purists of "The Bends" or "OK" periods. Some even accused Radiohead of hopping the "electronica bandwagon." Gone (though as we learned, not for long) were the guitar breaks and rave ups we had always heard. Instead, filling there place were the electronic bleeps and drum machine fills, indiscernible lyrics that wee overshadowed by massive ambient sounds. There is an element of everything melding together on Kid A, the violent horns at the end of "The National Anthem" ushering in the somber "How To Disappear Completely". Even the faux-jazz jam at the end of Optimistic serves a purpose, the staccato notes of a Rhodes piano quickly following it. Guitars were mostly thrown aside for this album, but Radiohead managed to turn rockers out of some of the big tracks. In fact, I rather like the guitar part used in place of the full band at the end of "The National Anthem", along with Jonny's radio part. In fact, the first song off Kid A I had ever heard was a live version of "In Limbo", and I was struck by how loud it was compared to some of the stuff from OK Computer. // 9

Lyrics: While Thom Yorke's vocals take more of a backseat in the overall landscape Kid A creates, the writing is just as prominent as ever. Slightly cryptic ("Everything In It's Right Place"), slightly nonsensical ("Kid A"), a majority of the time they don't really paint a clear picture nor tell a precise story. Save for the relaxing "Kid A", there is feeling of discrepancy throughout the album. But for some odd reason the lyrics just seem to go perfect with the music. Only Radiohead could make the line "Dinosaurs roaming the Earth" catchy. // 8

Overall Impression: Radiohead opened up a whole new realm of rock experimentation with Kid A. Melding ideas from electronica and jazz, they still managed to keep them in a pop context. Some will argue the pop statement, but I do believe that someone listening to the album now in 2009 would find it fairly accessible. "Optimistic" and "The National Anthem" are unarguably the only rockers on the record, and even Treefingers is thought of as filler (I like it, but I do think it breaks some of the momentum of the record). But I think we can unanimously agree that Kid A is a landmark album. // 10

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