This May Be The Year I Disappear Review

artist: recover date: 12/04/2004 category: compact discs
recover: This May Be The Year I Disappear
Released: Oct 12, 2004
Genre: Rock
Number Of Tracks: 12
This May Be The Year I Disappear is the album which should make you to look at the mainstream music in a new fashion.
 Sound: 10
 Lyrics: 6
 Overall Impression: 8
 Overall rating:
 6.5 
 Reviewer rating:
 8 
 Users rating:
 5 
 Votes:
 2 
review (1) user comments vote for this album:
overall: 8
This May Be The Year I Disappear Reviewed by: UG Team, on december 04, 2004
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: "We really wanted to make a record that was different and interesting, and not the same as everything that's going on right now..." And they've made it! Not so famous american band Recover have released their third full-length album This May Be The Year I Disappear. The record features varied content and it's not easy to mark any definite conception. It combines all of the modern tendencies -- from punk/hardcore to a germ of nu-metal, from peculiar hard rock to post-grunge sounds. Loaded with a couple energy anthems and a few sing-along tracks, The Year had not became a big thing in rock... "We don't feel like we fit in with the whole hardcore/melodic-punk/screamo/whatever's-going-on scene that people associate us with. At the same time, we're not some kind of trendy band a hipster can just get into to feel cool or whatever. The way we see it, there's good music?it could be anything from classic rock to 50 Cent, and everybody should be allowed to embrace it," says Robert Mann. With This May Be The Year I Disappear Recover suitably displays the creative development from Green Day cover band (as it was in the beginning of their musical career) to matured stylistics and music that plays in enough distinctive way. And it's simply impossible to leave the musicians' job without attention -- they've really made things better, though not ultimately. The job of both guitarists -- Robert Mann and Dan Keyes -- worth our special attention. Funny but crushing riffs of the opening track "Night Of The Creeps" with its short but solid wah-wah solo, agressive riffs of "Disappear", or slow and soft leads in "Fuck Me For Free" -- all of them add to the positive impression of the album ...and this list may be continued up to infinity. All in all, it's great sounding work with impressive musicians' skills of Recover. // 10

Lyrics: It was meant to be an "audio diary" of Recover vocalist Dan Keyes. "Basically, this record is an exploration of a young person's state of mind. It's taken from the way I see and feel," says Dan. Honestly, such kind of music initially implies instrumental arrangements to be the main part of it, but not the lyrics and I suppose This May Be The Year I Disappear isn't an exception. As it seems, the lyrics are just a set of occasionally interesting and somewhat original ideas and nothing else -- chaotic, rambling, with no particular meaning -- it's just the instrument to amplify the music. As to the singer -- he is pretty talented. Dan Keyes can both sing and scream. Through the listening to this album you can't guess what odd thing he will do next -- it imparts some fascination to the record. // 6

Overall Impression: This May Be The Year I Disappear is the album which should make you to look at the mainstream music in a new fashion. The biggest advantage of Recover is that they haven't made this record in a monotonous key -- how it's practied in these days -- as far as the songs selection concerned. It should please fans of absolutely different music directions. The band showed that the modern culture hasn't lost the ability to develop and I hope that new and upcoming acts can follow the good example of Recover. // 8

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