Scars On Broadway Review

artist: Scars On Broadway date: 12/16/2008 category: compact discs
Scars On Broadway: Scars On Broadway
Release Date: Jul 29, 2008
Label: Interscope
Genres: Rock, Alternative Rock
Number Of Tracks: 15
Scars On Broadway takes a few leaps away from the circus-rock sound that Daron Malakian and John Dolmayan delivered in System Of A Down.
 Sound: 8.4
 Lyrics: 8.2
 Overall Impression: 8.3
 Overall rating:
 8.4 
 Reviewer rating:
 8.3 
 Users rating:
 8.4 
 Votes:
 97 
reviews (11) 37 comments vote for this album:
overall: 7.3
Scars On Broadway Reviewed by: UG Team, on august 12, 2008
4 of 9 people found this review helpful

Sound: If you're a fan of System of a Down, you've likely taken some interest in the various band members' solo projects. Audiences don't necessarily want a rehashing of what SOAD has done in the past, and guitarist Daron Malakian and drummer John Dolmayan's Scars On Broadway has indeed take a pretty large step away from previous efforts with Serj Tankian. SOAD always had almost a circus-like metal vibe, going in every direction, but still keeping a melodic coherency. Often times there is more of a punk vibe on Scars On Broadway's self-titled album, and there are highs and lows amongst the 15 featured songs. From the opening track Serious, it does seem that Malakian has decided to strip down his guitar tricks and go for more traditional power chords. There's not necessarily a bad thing, but Scars On Broadway almost sounds like a punk band during Serious. In fact, vocally there are moments when Malakian sounds a bit like Jello Biafra from the Dead Kennedys. The punk element is kept primarily for the verses, while the chorus features the melodic side of Malakian we've heard on SOAD's Mesmerize and Hypnotize albums. Scars On Broadway does incorporate some interesting instrumental elements, and it's usually the synth-related ones that are the most successful. Exploding/Reloading is one of the highlights of the album, thanks to it's unusual intro. What could have been a simple power chord intro is doubled with an infectious toy-piano like synth line. Exploding/Reloading features one of the fastest tempos of the record and some of the most creative choices in terms of arrangement, and it deserves to be made into a single. World Gone Wrong includes some other cool sections, including what sounds like a classical piano (but could likely be synth as well), which breaks up the monotony of the basic chords. Stoner Hate is one of the more unusual tracks in terms of the vocals, with Malakian delivering a twist on the Mary Poppins' lyric Supercalifranglisticexpialidocious. Don't worry, it's not a cover of the entire Disney song, and it's actually one of the more aggressive, punk-driven tracks on the album. Stoner Hate is a bit spastic, but it's somewhat reminiscent to SOAD's material. There are some songs that do feel a bit forced. It seems like Scars on Broadways is trying to make the track Chemicals as bizarre and over-the-top as it possibly can be. From the oddly chanted chorus (Come eat some chemicals with me) to the beautifully sung We're on drugs portion, it does feel suitably trippy. Toward the end of Chemicals, it actually begins to get repetitive. Certain lines will sound inspired and fresh at first, but after they're repeated an abundance of times (which Malakian tends to do in several tracks), it can get stale. // 7

Lyrics: Most of the lyrics on the album do get your attention, and it's safe to assume many of the lines were inspired by headlines in the news. There's a cynicism attached to much of it, particularly in a song like 3005. Malakian sings, Let's clap our hands for the president and Jesus Christ; And did I mention Charlie Manson and everybody else who was nice? It's respectable that Malakian does seem to reflect upon today's society in much of the album, but then you get to Chemicals. It's a bizarre little song (Let's get ready to rock; I piss on your face; While you suck on my dick), and Malakian's delivery makes it all the more bizarre. // 8

Overall Impression: Even though Malakian is primarily known for his guitarist duties in SOAD, the self-titled Scars on Broadway is focused more toward his vocal strengths. We were given a touch of that side on the last SOAD's albums, and it does seem that Malakian has found his new love. He's not a bad frontman and he does have a fascinating delivery, but his vocals do tend to bounce between being engaging and annoying. While there are some interesting ideas/approaches musically and a few killer numbers, the songwriting on the whole doesn't quite live up to Malakian's work in SOAD. // 7

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overall: 9.3
Scars On Broadway Reviewed by: downvictim, on august 12, 2008
2 of 3 people found this review helpful

Sound: The sound of this album is right up the same alley as any System of a Down album. Most songs follow the sound of Mezmerize/Hypnotize, but the sound definately has a new feel to it. There's more electronic sounds, and also Daron's playing goes a bit beyond anything he did with system. Basically sounds exactly like any fan would expect. Soad sound, minus serj, with Daron's sound elaborated. I was worried Daron might try to sing too much on his own which could've ended up badly. As much as I like him, I think system's work was best with serj handling the bulk of the vocals. But in Scars, Daron voice really stands out in a good way and there are often times where there is some good background harmony provided by Frankie Perez, so he isn't left to sing alone. I enjoy the guy's music, but admit his voice could get whiny if not used right. Also we get to hear some of Daron's singing we never got to hear in System. He moves outside of what he's already done, which is great. John's drumming continues on with his signature style, which is fine just the way it is. The new guys (Frankie Perez, Danny Shamoun, and Dominic Cifarelli) fill out the band nicely by completing the sound established with SOAD without poisoning it. If you are a fan you won't be disappointed. // 9

Lyrics: Daron wrote a lot for soad, so the scars lyrics aren't really all that different. But that's a good thing. Lyrics are left open to the listener's interpretation like system. You get a good mix of good lyrics "Let's f*** the world with all it's trend, they say it's all about to end" (They Say), and ridiculous lyrics "When you sing lalalalala, stona hatez got yo back, california's been invaded by a hippy psychopath!" // 10

Overall Impression: 01. Serious - kicks things off with a bang. Good fast moving song with a good riff in the middle. Great way to start the album. 02. Funny - a little slower than you might be expecting. And not really a "funny" song. But some cool sounds throughout. 03. Exploding/Reloading - picks up the pace set by "Serious". Really good song here. Gotta love "I like, I like suicide, mixed with jesus christ yeahhh". Is that a pipe organ in the background? 04. Stoner Hate - I say, if SOAD ever got back together, it would sound something like this song. Riffs are styled like a mix of mezmermize and soad self-titled. "Rude, obnoxious, with an intent to kill." 05. Insane - a good sort of chill song. Good lyrics if you follow them right through. Well placed slower song because the last two were really high energy. 06. World Long Gone - really good song. Right up there with "They Say". Nice mix of heavy riffs and backing off. 07. Kill Each Other/Live Forever - songs raises a good point, and good music, the only thing I can say is, you know the whole song as soon as you read the title of the song. 08. Babylon - first real chill song on the cd. Really shows off Daron's voice. Proves for sure he's more than just the whiny backup guy from SOAD. It's a song you have to listen to the whole thing right through. It builds pretty nicely. 09. Chemicals - let's just say the first line of the song is "I smacked your face, you fell in love when I said f*** your mom... " The chorus is "Come eat some chemicals with me". Enough said. Daron screams like a pirate in this, it's hilarious. 10. Enemy - song starts with a nice little funk riff that feels out of place. But it fits right in with the craziness on this album. The last half of the song is hilarious. Listen in the background at 2:20. 11. Universe - lyrics get repeated a lot. But the focus of this song seems to be more on the music than the lyrics. There's a lot of good playing here. 12. 3005 - classic Daron Malakian material right here. If you are a fan this is what you want. "Let's do high five, for a genocide, and the internet, and all the communication skills that are lost when we are dead." 13. Cute Machines - song only has like four lines. But the music is fast and quick and heavy. Well placed though. You could see this in the background of a military video. 14. Whoring Streets - the way I interpret the lyrics, this is the best written song on the CD. If you're not into interpretive music, then this is just a slow song you probably won't like. 15. They Say - excellent song. Very obviously single material. This song seems to represent the theme of the whole album. Might've been better placed at the start, but us fans have been listening to it for months, so it's a great way to end, in that sense. This album will impress everyone who has waited for it all this time. Interesting thing here is, while the album is so good, it shows the contrast between Daron Malakian and Serj Tankian. Now that they have both gone off and (essentially) done their own thing, we see how they stand up as individuals. We get a demonstration of exactly what each of them bring to system of a down. Yeah, Elect the Dead was great, but could you imagine having Daron coming in with backup vocals in "Empty Walls"? Imagine Serj having a verse in Stoner Hate! I think their separate ventures will eventually remind everyone how much of a powerhouse they were together. I've got a feeling they will all come back around in the next few years, and I'm think they will make an album that could even surpass Toxicity. Definitely enjoyed Scars on Broadway, but all it seems to do is make you want to hear the guys together again. This stuff is great and should make some great concerts for a while now. But at the end of the day nothing they do alone will ever be as good as what they could do together. // 9

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overall: 9.3
Scars On Broadway Reviewed by: salamander121, on august 12, 2008
2 of 3 people found this review helpful

Sound: Scars on Broadway, formed by former SOAD (System of a Down) guitarist, Daron Malakian shows a fresh start of something geat to come. Malakian, accompanied by former SOAD drummer John Dolmayan show us their is definetaly life after death for these ex-SOAD members. Daron (who wrote song's for SOAD) gives us more or less 15 great songs which each sound special in their own way, some of them with a hint of SOAD to them as Daron had mentioned himself: "When the music comes out, it will still be structured, just like System of a Down's music is". But getting away from SOAD, Scars On Broadway are off to a great start with this album, leaving me wanting more. They take their influence of classic rock and infuse it with electronica in a few of their songs. You would think that the result would be disasterous, but Scars On broadway have nailed it perfectly. For a debut album, their off to a good start. // 10

Lyrics: The lyrics in the whole of this album are very politically based: "If we're gonna kil each other, How we gonna' live for ever?" or "I know it's really hard to see, That we are the enemy of the Earth". Basically this album is trying to get the message out, that if we don't change the way things are soon, we're all going to end up dead or create a very unstable world. As for Daron's singing, he always (in my opinion) had a quirkier more eccentric voice which I prefered than Serj Tankian who was lead vocals. Daron's voice is melodic and has a very wide range, although not hitting many low notes but that doesn't spoil it that much. // 8

Overall Impression: Scars On Broadway, to me, is a classic album, one which is definetaly worth buying whether your a SOAD fan or not. I think there in a song in this album that will appeal to somebody, whether is the hard-rock "Stoner Hate" or the soft-rock "Whoring Streets". The most impressive songs in this album in my opinion would have to be "Exploding-Reloading" or "They Say," both disconnecting themselves from that "System Of A Down side project" stereotype that Scars On Broadway have somehow picked up. In my overall view on this album, it would definately be one you have to own. I call it a classic. // 10

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overall: 7.7
Scars On Broadway Reviewed by: Aaron_Yeo, on august 12, 2008
1 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sound: First things first, I've been a mediocre SOAD fan since 1999. I liked the sound of their music, it was one of my first exposures to anything metal, and while I've never been crazy about them, they were always welcome on any playlist of mine. Also, I'm a sort of anti-mainstream, pro-prog kinda guy. But backgrounds aside, Scars on Broadway's first album is, well, nothing spectacular. I was able to get my hands on a legitimate promo copy, and then ripped it so I could give it a good listen over a long 10 hour flight and several train rides. And my first impressions are still with me. By the way, I'm not going to give a detailed description of each song, but an overall feel for the entire album. So, this is Daron's rock band. After reading his short interview in July's Guitar World, it's quite clear what his aims were. To walk away from the metal of System of a Down, and pursue what he likes more. And it's always interesting to see what a member from a successful band does when creative differences arise. However, on pretty much every track on Scars on Broadway, you're going to have an awfully hard time not thinking that this is just Daron Malakian's side project. Even though he explicitly says it's his main focus. Straight away Daron's droning vocals, made famous on SOAD's last two efforts, Mezmerize and Hypnotize, jump in to do just that. His voice and style are very trance-like, and his distinctive timbre is ever so present. Lots of vocal harmony is there as well, and just thickens his normally light sound. The album also features the familiar fast half-tone up-and-down 'rapping' (emphasis on the quotes). Franky Perez's backing vocals are hidden pretty deep within the mix. You have to be looking out for them to hear it. As far as the guitars go, Daron still retains that same tone as he did in SOAD. The riffs are just as melodic and deep with his trademark minor tonality and lots of fast-paced strumming and the occasional metal chugs. I'm not quite sure why his guitarwork, when very similar to SOAD's, seems more rockish and less metal. Perhaps he's stopped downtuning, maybe the drive is turned down a little, perhaps it's just the mix. But on the topic of rock versus metal, this is barely pushing it. I'd give it a 60% rock 40% metal sound. There's some nice droplets of synth here and there, but they only really serve to add another layer to the mix. Mr. Danny Shamoun does add to the sound in a positive way, though. The bass is nothing special, but who expects something special from a rock band, eh? Hah. Jokes aside, it is rather featureless, just following the rhythm guitar. I also get this strange feeling that John Dolmayan, the emotionless drummer from SOAD, is holding back a little. Either that or he doesn't feel as at home in rock as Daron does. His drumming bursts out in some of the heavier choruses, but in the majority of the album his potential isn't being realized. // 8

Lyrics: His lyrics and somewhat filled with emotion. Not full, but enough. Some lyrics about love, politics, the big life, and some about seemingly pure nonsense, until someone decides to tackle it and explain the true meaning. He's got his erratic moments, a few 'screams', he's got his strong lines, but again, nothing spectacular. There's not much to really say here. It's what you'd expect from a System effort. // 7

Overall Impression: Overall, nothing really stands out. I do realize that most of this review is focused on SOB and SOAD, but I'm pretty sure that's mostly everyone's main concerns right now. No one is here thinking to themselves, "Oooh Scars on Broadway, that sounds pretty cool," but instead "I want to hear what Daron does without Serj." So be it. The rest of the band members (Franky Perez, Danny Shamoun and Dominic Cifarelli) probably are holding back from inputting to the band, afraid of the magicman Daron. But you can't blame them. If Petrucci hired you to play rhythm guitar for him, you're not gonna argue with him. But maybe I'm wrong. Either way, this doesn't feel like a new band. I'm not feeling it. It's Daron's side project. Maybe he should take a lesson from Richard Kruspe and Emigrate. // 8

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overall: 7.7
Scars On Broadway Reviewed by: Metallicaloveu, on august 12, 2008
1 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sound: I've been a huge System Of A Down fan for as long as I've appreciated music, and as much as people have criticised Malakian's contribution into the making of their last two albums, Mesmerize/Hypnotize, I was still eager to find out what Scars on Broadway had to offer. The opening track "Serious" immediately sends you into the direction they are going and you get an direct feel for the new sound. Most tracks have really catchy, unique and original riffs, if not with guitars, with keyboards dubbed with heavy effects. There are moments, when you can clearly hear System Of A Down seeping through with sounds from their first album. I find it hard to place the sound in a genre which suits them best. Scars On Broadway cover a great deal of ground where all songs have more than just guitars, bass, and drums. Each song has been tailored to perfection and give out an original sound which is frequently seeked out for. // 8

Lyrics: Compared to Daron's previous work the lyrics have improved in places but suffered in others. There were times when I felt the lyrics had a deep meaning and some lines are very clever that you clearly have to have a talent to think them up. However there were other times when I felt, Daron had to end the verse somehow and couldn't think up of anything better. For example "I'll piss on your face while you suck on my cock" doesn't really match up to "If were going to kill each other how are we gonna live forever, if were gonna live forever how we going to kill eachother?" One clearly has a meaning that you have to seek out whilst sounding decent, whereas the other may have a meaning but sounds slightly immature. The album as a whole is filled with poetic genius and this is where Malakian makes up for everything that could possibly be wrong. // 8

Overall Impression: Malakian's objective was not to produce an album just like System Of A Down. But I would recommend Scars On Broadway to anybody that has enjoyed listening to System Of A Down throughout any part of their career. If you really loved System for who they were and what they created then you shall enjoy this album to the full. // 7

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overall: 8.3
Scars On Broadway Reviewed by: unregistered, on august 12, 2008
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: Skepticism is a word very largely used when former band-mates announce a hiatus and a side-project attempt. I'm sure we were all skeptical, especially since there was never any definition of who was the true talent behind System Of A Down. Serj's album was very unique and so, I'm sure we were all satisfied, and even prepared for a let down with Scars On Broadway. Now though, I'm thrilled to say that "Daron Malakian's side project" did not disappoint. I'm even beginning to think that maybe the split of the hard rock icons was for the better. Scars on Broadway brings the hard punk style we could always feel so slightly in System of A Down, and breaths a new, creative, and startling sound to the music scene. Though there is a faint familiar sound coming from this band. For those of you who have heard the leaked Guns N' Roses material, you'll notice a resemblance between the two bands. With just the guitar in Scars on Broadway though, you can sense a metal, punk, rock, and dare I say a soul sound to the music. The blend of these elements, along with the subtle touch that Daron Malakian provides in his vocal talent create something that comes close to crossing chaos, but reaches greatness on its way. // 9

Lyrics: Can anything compare to the strange lyrics of Daron Malakian? They grab you from where you're standing and confuse the hell out of you. If you think with them though, you'll find that they carry a sinister stare and a meaningful message. Following the topics of love, politics, society, the future, death, drugs, and of course, prostitution, there is undoubtedly room to speak. The way they flow with the sound of Scars On Broadway is no less than fitting. Interpretation is all of the listener though. // 8

Overall Impression: I think it should be known, that this album will likely never be a hit. MTV won't pick up on it, and it won't receive excessive radio play. Never fret though. This album will hit airwaves in a light, subtle way, giving those who do come across it the chance to truly enjoy it. Chances are there are a few songs on here that don't exactly speak to you, or stand out at all. I find that to be normal with any album. The sound of this album is not at all the smiling face of mainstream media. There is very little to complain about with this album, if this is your type of music. Songs like Serious, World Long Gone, and Babylon are very catchy, but maintain a strong, unique sound you wouldn't normally find with a hard rock album. We are, of course, talking about one of the masterminds behind System Of A Down though, and with that alone in his portfolio, you've got to hold some faith that the first impression won't fade; and it doesn't. // 8

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overall: 7.7
Scars On Broadway Reviewed by: AngryGoldfish, on august 12, 2008
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: This is the band, Scars on Broadway (SOB), that arose from the 'separated' ashes of the untouchable System of a Down. Oddly enough though, that word untouchable has now be changed to touchable (just like in the film Untouchable) with this crackin' album. Just for a start, I will mention how little there is to dislike about this, it's just so much fun, keep that in your mind as you read this. To explain, the sound on this LP varies from classic System of a Down styling, Stoner Hate, Babylon and the hilarious, Funny with it's perfectly placed synthesizer effect. While Serious has the sharp contrast of The Clash, Ramones and other high-end Punk acts with Beatles-esque melodies that, even after one listen, will have you singing in joy! There are many triumphs on this album, in fact, there is not a single song I would skip, which is a quality, I predict, attained itself from old System of a Down records. One problem I noted on the first few listens though is the very simplistic layouts and patterns there is in this album. it's all very predictable and it therefore becomes a little dull after a few listens, not drastically of course, though. The middle of the album feels like filler, in a sense, between the excellent opening and the awesome conclusion. This is not necessarily a bad thing, but it does certainly drag this album down underneath shallow waters, it can still breath. Of course, this still retains the technically accomplished drumming of John Dolmayan, without the more metal influenced double foot, and it once again adds a depth to it overall that feels very homely, especially if you are aware of his previous work. The guitar work is a little more back to basics and is not as prevalent in the mix as you would expect from Daron Malakian, but I really love that surprise. It shows his abilities to experiment in the studio, not just in his writing process. There isn't a whole lot of information I feel I can add to this, apart from what I just mentioned: The art work is created by Daron's father, which coincides nicely with the theme of Red depicted throughout. The musical style is fast and heavy, soft and casual. Angry and polite, rude and pretty. it's all quite unfathomable! Another quick point to mention is the very laid-back method of recording centered in this album. There are very little overdubs or any heavy producing work ladening it down, which I am growing quite fond of recently. Something fans of stripped down engineering might look out for. // 8

Lyrics: I must admit, I wasn't overly impressed with the lyrics, but that's not to say they aren't very affluent and poetic. It just seems a little clichd with it's common rhymes and basic terminology. But, on the other hand, the often odd rhythmical patterns more than makes it up for that slight shortcoming. The lyrics are not as politically centered or potent as you would anticipate, but it's a nice break to the ears and the senses. It does, of course, being Malakian, preserve a certain belonging of anger towards American and many other policital 'issues', so any fans of that style of writing will have much to look forward to. There are a substantial amount of surprises on your first few listens, but after that, it just becomes predictable, both lyrical and musically. That is the test for me, if it still retains it's intrigue and wild, interesting language after many many listens have been spent. Unfortunately, this record doesn't quite reach those high standards of repeated interest. Nonetheless, it more than suits the musical style and keeps you happy throughout. Sorry if I missed anything out, this was written in a little bit of a hurry. // 7

Overall Impression: If you are looking for a new System of a Down, you are foolish, there will only be one SOAD, but if you are on the search for a quality record with excellent vocals, precise drumming, varying styles of music and sound then you are in for a mini treat. This is certainly better than Serj Tankian's album Elect the Dead, which just felt dead to me, but it's still not as good as any of the albums System of a Down brought out. I cannot think of another direct artist that would interlink with SOB's (yes, that is funny) sound accurately, unfortunately. I don't believe I am required to though. If I could compare this to another group then it would not have nearly as much appeal and creativeness. Highlights on this simple album include the weird and wonderful Chemicals, with it's iconic lyrics and entirely crazy introduction; The single They Say with it's crunchy guitar work, insane bends and true closing character; The gorgeous opener Serious with it's Hardcore vocals and swingin' drum beat; The country styled 3005 with it's potent, and rather darkly humorous, lyrics; there's so much potential for intense enjoyment hidden within here. What I truly love, though, about this album is Daron's vocals. It varies so much with each controlled alteration of song category and musical directions, that it's hard to recognize who it is. Cute Machines is a good example of that. He alters his voice to suit the songs more sadistic and sleazy attitude and it's quite surprising what he can put his voice to. The same is with 3005 where he opts for a more Lynyrd Skynyrd vocal approach. Although there are faults and options I am not overly keen on, it's still a great listen. Something you can enjoy many times, and I predict Scars on Broadway will be here for quite some time. // 8

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overall: 9
Scars On Broadway Reviewed by: vindabomb, on august 14, 2008
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: An Ottawa music critic put it best: Scars on Broadway is like System of a Down on Ecstasy. Which it truly is. Between Malakian's melodic or shrieking voice and the manic guitar, Scars is strips away most of the pounding rhythms and thick, heavy guitar that made System famous. Malankian's music is like SOAD "Lite". Less force, more harmony. Most of the focus is on his impressive singing, which comes out full force, due to the fact that this is NOT an album that will shake the walls of your room. For the true System fan, "Stoner Hate" is the most like a System song, complete with pounding drums and lyrics sung at Malakian Hyperspeed. Also, I found that "Whoring Streets" is very similar to SOAD "Lost in Hollywood" (from the Mezmerize album). Unfortunately, the weakest song on the album, in terms of sound is called "Funny". The song has the intricate Malakian lyrics, but the sound is some hybrid of pop/rock/electronica. To some people that may be appealing, but for most people who are purchasing this album because of their love for SOAD, "Funny" way leave you confused at the direction that Malakian is taking with Scars. But if you can survive the fluff of the second song, the rest of the album is well worth it. "Babylon", is a personal favourite of mine, due to the fact that it starts out as a typical Malakian ballad, but then shifts to a lighter tone, and then switches to hard rock, and then becomes heavier. Finally, I want to address "Chemicals". Personally, it's my favourite song on the whole album because of it's contrast. It moves away from the manic instrument pieces of the rest of Scars and takes on a more traditional power chord hardrock guitar. However, Malakian changes his lyrics from intricacies to twisted offensiveness. It is a welcome pause from all the rhythmic craziness of Scars to a more traditional song. It is the most "normal" song musically, but lyrically, it is by far the most outrageous. Appreciate the hidden intricacy. // 9

Lyrics: When I flipped through the lyrics booklet, I was rather shocked. Compared to System, Malakian has taken on a much more minimalistic approach to his songwriting. System songs would be varied in their lyrics, with multiple bridges and short choruses. Scars lyrics go no more than a few lines. But that doesn't hold the song quality back at all. In fact, Scars seems to thrive on simplistic lyrics. SOAD had lyrics to provoke thought. Scars uses their lyrics as backing to their music, not vice versa. For example, the song "Cute Machines". It is one of the most musically entertaining pieces on the entire album, and according to Malakian, is getting a great reaction when played live. But the entire song consists of no more the eleven different words. But it Scars somehow pulls it off. As for the style of Malakian's lyrics, they are much less politicized than when he wrote for System. "Enemy", "Universe", and "3005" are the most consciencious songs on the whole album; whose lyrics deal with humanity's slow destruction of the planet. If you want typical, spastic SOAD style lyrics, listen to "Serious" and "Stoner Hate". The lyrics don't really go anywhere specific, but they are very similar to later SOAD. The Scars approach to lyrics: Short and Sweet. And how sweet it is. // 9

Overall Impression: A solid first album, and hopefully the first of many. I am not by any means encouraging the duo of Scars on Broadway to completely distance themselves from SOAD, because they worked so hard to build it. My hope is that System will rise again, but when the time comes that System is no more, Scars will be here to keep us listening. Malakian stated that he wanted Scars to be something totally new. He definitely succeeded at that. But what's better is that most fans of SOAD will enjoy this album, and new fans are sure to be won. Malakian created something new. But the best part about it, is that it's excellent. // 9

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overall: 9
Scars On Broadway Reviewed by: upchuck51, on september 04, 2008
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: The band scars on broadway has a very unique sounds it not like anything I have ever heard. I bought the album because I was a huge fan of S.O.A.D. but Scars on broadway did not have the sound I thought they would have. I as under the impression it was gonna be the same heavy sound with the deep meaning just without the vocals from surge. suprsingly it was more gentaly and had a semi "hiippie" flow to it. It is a completly origanl sound. I have never heard anything that follows along the same lines // 9

Lyrics: The lead singer Daron still amazes us as he busts out amazing lyrics while still play his amazing guitar. I was under the impresion that the songs were gonna be under heavy political influence. They were not the lyrics were more posing questions to get it's listeners to think. The main overall message I retrived from this album was that we need to think about change in our future I really liked the thoughts that this CD produced in my mind. The only flaw I saw was that some songs seemed to get repetitive. // 9

Overall Impression: Overall this is a must get album. I really absoutly love the songs 3005, They say, and kill each other/ live forever. I am not a big fan of the song serious. That may just be because of the fact that my friends completly overplayed that song and killed it but I started to feel the repetitive feeling first with this song then I felt it in Funny and then babylon. If some one were to come up and punch me in the nads and then steal this CD from me besides being extreamly pissed and bent over currled up on the ground I would of course go out and buy this CD again. // 9

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overall: 7
Scars On Broadway Reviewed by: Prisoner5, on october 21, 2008
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Sound: I am too cheap to go out and buy the CD so I heard They Say a few times before I went and finally got a copy, and I was quite optimistic. And thus, I was disappointed. Drums, bass, and guitar were nothing special nor exceptional, although they did retain a certain System feel from the drummer. However, once Daron took over as main singer, his melodic guitar completely dropped off the face of the album. The guitar is bland rhythm, with some decent melodic lines, but nothing nearly as interesting as the work Daron did under System. The Eastern European feel too has somewhat disappeared, except with one song that I can't remember off the top of my head. All in all, I feel that Daron took the System songs that were less melodic and didn't counter-balane them with anything else. // 6

Lyrics: I have a joke about System of a Down, said with all the love in the world: They make up 3 2-line phrases, and use one for the verse, one for the chorus, and one for the bridge. This applied to this album as well as Serj (although less so for Serj, since he decided that lyrics and logic no longer mix). One song (Chemicals), I simply could not listen to because of the way the begining was sung. While the lyrics are nice, and memorable, there are not nearly enough of them. One thing they do have going for them is the melodic singing combined with some of Daron's awesome vocal harmonies. // 8

Overall Impression: I must say, I was absolutely delighted when I heard that Daron was doing his own thing too. I had listened to Elect the Dead by Serj, and after about a week of dubiously playing it, really warmed up to it. If you combine this album and Elect the Dead, you get a System of A Down album, with the Scars providing drive and rhythm, and Serj providing lyricism and melody. I don't think anyone can compare this to a System album favorably. However, some songs were good, and some where memorable, and so, I keep it in my collection. I only hope that by keeping the title of the album eponymous, they don't mean to suggest tht this is all they have to offer. // 7

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overall: 8.7
Scars On Broadway Reviewed by: StonerHater, on december 16, 2008
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Sound: From System to Scars, Daron Malakian has made the best quality metal that has left people awed, excited, raged or disturbed. The music he and his fellow band mates write is very unique with both haters and lovers of it. Daron and Serj Tankian(system of a down) both have brought meaning to the world of Nu Metal, and even though they have gone on possibly a "permanent hiatus", they continue to make their stage-raging music to the max. // 9

Lyrics: Scars On Broadway's lyrics are a bit different than that of SOAD's. System focused on putting hidden meanings to their songs, and using their work as a message of what they believe. Daron has gone on another way of writing his music. By writing to the tone or aggression of their songs, Scars On Broadway's lyrics fit perfectly for putting people in the mood they want them in. Plus, from Daron's unique voice, it's not just some regular guy singing with the same old Sevendust kind of band. His high-pitched voice and highly excited songs are a perfect match. // 8

Overall Impression: Malakian has been able to create a sound for Scars that is so unique it's uncomparable. Scars music sounds very metal, dark, and rock n' roll when you hear it. But the surprise is that they do not distort the guitars very much at all. This is a very uncommon thing to see in a metal/rock band such as this. Songs like "Stoner Hate", "They Say", and "Serious" are perfect examples of how dark these guys can make their music sound without a ****load of effects put on the tracks. And the soft songs they have, such as "Funny", "3005", and "Whoring Streets" all are great songs that you have to hear to believe. The only thing you may not like about this album, is you may have to listen to it a few times to start to get a feel for it. It is a new style of music, but once you hear Scars on Broadway's first album, you'll only be wanting the second. // 9

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