Nothing Is Sound Review

artist: switchfoot date: 04/19/2013 category: compact discs
switchfoot: Nothing Is Sound
Released: Sep 13, 2005
Genre: Alternative Pop/Rock, Post-Grunge
Label: Sony
Number Of Tracks: 12
With "Nothing Is Sound" Switchfoot have realized that with universal success comes being all things to all people.
 Sound: 9.5
 Lyrics: 9.1
 Overall Impression: 9.4
 Overall rating:
 9.2 
 Reviewer rating:
 9.4 
 Users rating:
 9 
 Votes:
 84 
reviews (15) 3 comments vote for this album:
overall: 8.3
Nothing Is Sound Reviewed by: UG Team, on november 01, 2005
6 of 10 people found this review helpful

Sound: This may seem like a classical Cinderella-story about a band that became famous over one night. It may, if you forget about endless touring and three indie albums they released since 1997 before their 2003's break out "Beautiful Letdown." With so much experience behind, no wonder that their new record turned out to be so strong. Being busy with non-stop touring, the band recorded the new album on the road -? Switchfoot set up their instruments and equipment in the dressing room and did record sessions in between interviews and concerts. Apart from not being rushed during recording, that gave them a lot of other advantages, like the opportunity to test the tracks -- before recording, the band tried the songs out on the audience during concerts and that helped them to figure out the right sounding. You can never guess though it wasn't recorded in a proper studio due to its polished production, created by the band itself and "Beautiful Letdown" producer John Fields. Melodic alternative rock and power pop, topped with philosophical social reflections, fitted in 12 songs creates the band's fifth studio album "Nothing Is Sound," out September 2005. The record is quite similar to its predecessor break-out "Beautiful Letdown," though with more depressive mood. The band managed what others tried and failed -? they saved their style and their music, but created a new different record. They're still singing about politicians, nation, finding order in life's chaos, their music is still guitar-driven, but this time there are less electronics and more raw guitar rock, distortion guitars sound rougher which add bitter to the sound and the mood of the record is darker. Rhythm section creates a solid base for lots of layers of guitars (this, being the main theme in the music, even requested a new guitarist, Andrew Shirley) and in most songs guitars work in synchronization with it. Barrel drums create a deeper sound, boasting into quiet choruses with acoustic effects to make the sound volume. The opener high-powered "Lonely Nation" is an ode to the generation of "cyber kids" -? communication for them is so easy through numerous instant messengers and text messages, but people become more and more lonely. "Happy Is A Yuppie Word" is the centerpiece of the record and has the catchiest melody. It's one of the darkest songs on the album, but it brightens up towards the end. "The Blues" is the closest track to "Beautiful Letdown" and has a melancholy mood. It's another song about lonely people, lost in questions and answers. // 8

Lyrics: It's obvious the guys are maturing and you can see that through their lyrics -? if songs on "Beautiful Letdown" were mostly happy, proving, that "live is still worth living" (careless happiness, which is peculiar to youth), here the desperation is almost in every song -- "happy is a yuppie word" (disappointment after realizing everything is not so perfect they've imagined it was). Still, there's a ray of hope behind every depressive line. It's just different happiness Foreman's singing about -? "Blessed is the man, who has lost it all." Jon Foreman finds millions of questions for you that make you think. No wonder -? that's the way Jon writes music -? he asks himself questions and then answers them. Therefore the music appears more like an essay about "what my life is?" -- "Is this the new year or just another night?" Doesn't matter what he's singing about, those are honest and thoughtful words. // 9

Overall Impression: What I like about the band is that they analyze what happens to them -? instead of singing "this girl on the cover of the magazine looks so fine is her sexy lingerie," they go "sex is currency/she sells cars, she sells magazines." They can actually think and make some conclusions to create songs from them later, unlike most rockstars, who feel too lazy to make good lyrics. This lead-up Switchfoot use not only to writing lyrics. Their sound is unique as the band isn't chained by their music influences. Instead of just copying them, Switchfoot learn from them, which allow the band to vary the sound in millions of ways and create their own style. They infuse the record with personal moments and feelings, which makes it unique. Try asking yourself questions you hear in the songs and think about what the band's singing about, and you might as well, find out something very important about yourself. Sorry to say there's a lack of beautiful ballads and catchy melodies that I liked about Switchfoot. And where did all the joy go? // 8

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overall: 8.3
Nothing Is Sound Reviewed by: takenthecannoli, on april 19, 2013
5 of 7 people found this review helpful

Sound: San Diego's Switchfoot began as a modest rock/pop group in the mid-nineties, identifying with but never fully integrating into the Christian contemporary music movement. Their early releases dealt with a mixture of spiritual and personal themes, from 1996's "Legend Of Chin" and a few silly debacles with girls to 1999's feel-good but melancholy "New Way To Be Human" and 2000's ever-searching "Learning To Breathe". In 2003, the band overwent a sonic remodel and found a platinum hit with "The Beautiful Letdown". Though a definite product of the MTV age, it reached levels of power and profundity few artists even (especially?) in the CCM community have ever hit. The album's titanic single "Dare You To Move" receives considerable airplay a decade later. Though some in the Christian community clung to Switchfoot as the band that might finally dignify the genre to mainstream audiences, the band still communicated with imagery and intimated at a striking emotional depth something many artists of faith have struggled to do without preaching. If intending to front a religious band at all, singer/lyricist Jon Foreman has relied more heavily on principle than ritual. "The Beautiful Letdown" certainly sounded secular for its time, and its success rocketed Switchfoot beyond the staple of CCM. The follow-up to Switchfoot's flagship release, 2005's "Nothing Is Sound", is the product of extensive touring and exploration for the band. Much of the record's lyrical content deals with experiences written very much from the heart: "The Shadow Proves The Sunshine"'s alludes to struggling African communities and "Happy Is A Yuppie Word" is Foreman's interpretation of a Rolling Stone interview with Bob Dylan. The musical composition follows suit, bringing the post-grunge of "The Beautiful Letdown" to greater heights and sculpting a bigger and darker sound. From the outset, the band is bitter, desperate, and evidently "breaking up inside." The introduction of guitarist Drew Shirley expands "Letdown"'s great riffs and melodic guitar work. However, it leaves much less room for bassist Tim Foreman, who led one of "The Beautiful Letdown"'s strongest cuts, "This Is Your Life". It's a bit disappointing to see bass-driven tracks dropped, though the instrument itself is still mixed very well. "Lonely Nation", quite opposite to "Letdown"'s triumphant opening, is indeed as lonely as anything Switchfoot has ever released. The guitars sound massive, Chad Butler is a powerhouse on the drums, and Tim Foreman rumbles on bass guitar. The chorus is unbelievably loud, and acts as a perfect precursor for the riff on "Stars", one of the album's lead singles. Throughout a fantastic opening run, the heavy reliance on guitar is part of what made bands like Nirvana resonate. Switchfoot achieves this to a stellar degree, blasting through the p-ssed-off "Politicians" and bursting into the only-too-catchy chorus of "Easier Than Love". Lessons learned from "Letdown" are certainly carried into "Sound", but rather than being used to correct any previous mistakes (here's to you, "Gone"), they're implemented into a sound completely new to the band. Softer moments are just as deeply moving as the crunch of the guitars, with "The Shadow Proves The Sunshine" exhibiting a world-weary Switchfoot at its most vulnerable, but most motivated. "The Blues" is a dreary and condescending stomp with the most dynamic sound of any song the band had created leading up to it. "Golden" is poppy but sensitive, taking the most nods from "The Beautiful Letdown" of any track here. Perhaps the two most striking tracks are "The Fatal Wound" and "Daisy". Both are near the end of the album, with "Daisy" acting as a closer and "The Fatal Wound" coming two tracks earlier. Both are primarily driven by the acoustic guitar. "Wound" is Switchfoot's darkest track to date, with seeping electronic moments and ominous whispering behind Foreman's subtly manipulated vocals. The song, especially considering its subject matter, is tempestuously black. "Daisy" is the balls-out emotional staple of the record, outstripping even the inspiring "Sunshine" and "Lonely Nation" with a build from quiet acoustic guitar to a rousing explosion of a coda. Where "Twenty-Four" flowed on the last record, "Daisy" soars. For the leaps and bounds Switchfoot made in its creation, "Nothing Is Sound" isn't without its weaknesses. While "We Are One Tonight" is a fun piece of rock/pop, there isn't much to it musically especially after "The Fatal Wound". Though not nearly as cheesy as "Gone" from the last record, it serves the same radio-friendly purpose. At other times, however, Switchfoot isn't quite friendly enough "Golden" is muddled in places and "The Setting Sun" drags the sound of "The Blues" out into a chipper bounce. Both are great tunes, and "The Setting Sun" has a great riff and beautiful instrumentation, but in the context of the record they do seem a bit slow. For the material it deals with, "Nothing Is Sound" seems to supply these tracks as pit stops to anyone wanting a break from the despair. Neither really detract from the overall experience, but neither add much other than more goodness to the band's repertoire. "The Beautiful Letdown" set an unprecedented standard for Switchfoot, and yet "Nothing Is Sound" dismisses it as though they've been writing the record for years. The sound is bigger, more complex, and markedly more interesting. The record knows when to be big, when to be intimate, when to be claustrophobic, when to be threatening, and even when to break. It has a linearity and a completeness that no release before it could boast. "Lonely Nation" and "Daisy" perfectly bookend a slew of Switchfoot at their best, and one could hardly have hoped for a better follow-up to an impressive breakthrough. // 8

Lyrics: The sound isn't the only dramatic change Switchfoot made for "Nothing Is Sound"; Jon Foreman steps up in the lyrical department with nary a hiccup. "Lonely Nation" is... well, lonely, and introduces a much more engaging message than "The Beautiful Letdown"'s scattered material. "Nothing Is Sound", though far from a concept album, has purpose and thematic definition. Ironically, this album is the real "beautiful letdown", clarifying the previous album's title track and its statement about "the drop-outs, the losers, the sinners, the failures, and the fools". Where "The Beautiful Letdown" dealt with broad ideas and positive outcomes, "Nothing Is Sound" is down in the dirt with the scum of the earth. Foreman's philosophy has an intriguing and fundamentally dark circle. "Stars" deals with blame, self-pity, self-doubt, and self-discovery simultaneously. "Happy Is A Yuppie Word" and "Politicians" are more outward in scope, but generally come back to the same problem: the self. They start at the symptoms ("Everything fails/Everything runs its course") and work steadily inward ("Everyone buys/Everyone's got a price"). Foreman's profound understanding of the human heart is most apparent in the album's airier tracks, especially "The Shadow Proves The Sunshine". Humanity is boiled down to "We are crooked souls trying to stay up straight/Dry our eyes in the pouring rain where/The shadow proves the sunshine" yet concludes with breathtaking strokes coupled with wonderful musical movements of hope: "Two scared little runaways/Hold fast to the brink of daylight where/The shadow proves the sunshine". Similarly, "Happy Is A Yuppie Word", even in observing the "time and a place/For all of this love and war", concludes ultimately that "nothing is sound". The master stroke of "Nothing Is Sound", even beyond Foreman's remarkable dissection of the human struggle, is the move into more mature subject matter. On one hand, this can be dismissed as a nice way to have broken from the stereotype of Christian or otherwise religious lyricism. At second glance, however, the record opens in dozens of directions previously glazed over. Already established is Foreman's ability to deal with internal battles of the human conscience, but when darker themes such as suicide, sin, and sex are thrown into the mix, he unwittingly elevates to the same level as conceptual masterminds such as Roger "WWII" Waters. "Easier Than Love" addresses the materialistic nature of sex in pop culture, but also recognizes the inner desire for love being at the root of "the monster we've become". He even goes as far as a bout with the devil in "The Fatal Wound", which is full of hints at satanic imagery without ever presenting the character as anything but something of a gunslinging rogue much like some of the best depictions of Lucifer himself, he advertises himself as a solution, rather than the problem. It's the gray area few dare venture, especially in the market Switchfoot had fashioned itself for. Hints are made at spirituality, though they are on such a marvelously human level that they put the best of Kutless and Jeremy Camp to shame. Just like depression, humiliation, greed, lust, and a multitude of other subjects, Foreman addresses spirituality as just another (albeit important) aspect of the human existence. No conclusions are made, but every question is asked. Foreman comes off as less an orthodox Christian in the 21st century and more a 21st century fan of the man Jesus Christ and, for that matter, any figure promoting the same values. Lines like "Oh, Lord, why did you forsake me/Please, Lord, don't be far away" are very human cries for help, rather than ritualistic prayers. Most importantly, Foreman is simply relatable, and presents spirituality as a winding road rather than a definitive path. "The Blues" states it most bluntly with a touching nod to the religious imagery of the hand of God and Kingdom Come: "Is this the finger/Or just another fist? /Is this the kingdom/Or just a hit and miss?" There is no preaching. There isn't even suggestive ushering to the church or the Bible or any such debate. He simply asks the questions with the audience. Vocally, Foreman's also stepped up. In the same vein as Bono, he possesses a powerful baritone range with brilliant performances especially in "The Blues", "Daisy", and "The Shadow Proves The Sunshine". There are few weak moments (all on tracks already outed as less interesting than the others), but at every moment his heart and soul are melted and poured into every note. As a great leaf taken from the last record's cut, "Ammunition", Foreman has some very powerful moments with the introduction of screaming most effective in "Lonely Nation" and "Daisy". As in the case of every previous release, he is personable in the intimate moments and soulful on the louder cuts. // 9

Overall Impression: Either Drew Shirley or Jon Foreman is the best thing ever to happen to Switchfoot take your pick. "Nothing Is Sound" was sculpted by the phenomenal performances from each of them as well as their band mates. The heavier sound lends itself well to the darker themes, and exploration on sonic and lyrical terms provides Switchfoot with a dynamic soap box. It comes as a bit of a shock that most of the material was composed by the band while on the road, though "The Setting Sun" certainly has a buddy road-trip feel to it. It was time well spent, and the result is Switchfoot's best up to its own creation. Nothing from "The Beautiful Letdown" is forgotten, but risks and adventures never before possible for the band are trudged through with a grim outlook and amplifiers that sound stories tall. Not only a musical thrill, "Nothing Is Sound" is a thematic masterwork. Some of the imagery is so horrifically dark, yet what few conclusions Switchfoot draws defies (or defines?) the human condition in a bright ray of hope. Likewise, the record itself opens Switchfoot to unlimited possibilities. If shallower cuts such as "We Are One Tonight" (which really is rather dull) can be avoided, the band may yet sculpt an even bigger hit.

// 8

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overall: 10
Nothing Is Sound Reviewed by: unregistered, on september 13, 2005
3 of 4 people found this review helpful

Sound: This albums sounds amazing. Not as slow as their previous albums, Nothing Is Sound really delivers, with songs like The Blues, Easier Than Love, Golden, The Setting Sun, and my favourite, Stars. In Stars, they rock it up a bit more, and in The Blues, the sound really reflects the mood of the lyrics, with simple chords and slow piano. Listening to this CD is a really enjoyable experience. Well done to Switchfoot for managing to spruce up their sound another level while keeping their layed-back sound that distinguishes them from everyone else. // 10

Lyrics: The lyrics in Nothing Is Sound are really good, some of the best I've heard in a while. Without overpreaching, these guys can really get their message across. Foreman is an awesome songwriter. // 10

Overall Impression: Overall this really good. I know this sounds like a really superficial, glowing review, but thats how good this album is, seriously. I have all their previous albums, and this is by far the best. They've made some changes to thier sound, enough to amaze, but not enough to change who they are. If I lost this album, I would definitely buy it again. // 10

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overall: 10
Nothing Is Sound Reviewed by: henryt-bags, on september 20, 2005
3 of 5 people found this review helpful

Sound: Switchfoot have really evolved soundwise, they used to be rockers who knew things about music, and occasionaly sang good songs. Now they are one of the greatest christian bands alive, if not the greatest band alive. The sound in this album is amazing, with really good guitar riffs, awesome basslines, and talented drumming, all blended beautifully together. My only qualm with this album is that the songs The Setting Sun and Lonely Nation almost sound the same, but aside from this, it's awesome. // 10

Lyrics: Foreman has always expressed a Christian message or view in all of his songs (which I'm not opposed to, I'm a christian), but in this album, their are no direct lyrics aimed at people who need to do this or that or whatever. Their lyrics are more subtle, and they were made so that anyone could relate to them. This is an improvement, so my friends are starting to get into them. Their lyrics are honest, and all have different stories or messages. // 10

Overall Impression: This is certainly their best, and it really got me into them, I've now bought Legend Of Chin, Learning To Breathe, and Beautiful Letdown. They've now reached international stardom, and they have proved their skills with awesome riffs that blend in with beautiful lyrics, and amazing chord changes that acompany the messages behind each song. The highlights are Lonely Nation, Stars, The Blues, and Golden. // 10

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overall: 9.7
Nothing Is Sound Reviewed by: ampersandrocks, on october 10, 2005
2 of 4 people found this review helpful

Sound: This CD is very good. It has great guitar and great vocals in it. I saw them play their CD live in concert and it was great too. Some of the best songs are "Stars," which was their single release in the summer, "Lonely Nation," "Stars Acoustic," which is a iTunes exclusive song, "Politicians" and "Golden." // 10

Lyrics: Their singer/guitarist Jon Foreman is a very good singer and writes very well. The lyrics are good and appropiate with no bad language (it is not a Parental Advisory album). // 9

Overall Impression: It is definitely the best album of their 4 albums. I have learned to play many of their songs on the guitar and they are easy to learn but sound good. I also have most of the songs on my mp3 player. I would suggest you to get this CD but if you can get it on iTunes so you can get "Stars Acoustic." It is a great CD. // 10

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overall: 10
Nothing Is Sound Reviewed by: unregistered, on september 19, 2005
1 of 3 people found this review helpful

Sound: I love the direction that switchfoot is going in. Their early stuff is top notch, but I have fallen in love with this new grudgy, harder, down to earth rock tone that they have developed over the years. This CD is the picture you find in the dictionary under "great music." At time is feels raw and lazy, other times it feel joyous and light, and yet still other times it is just plain energetic. The instumentals are top notch and blend magnificently with the lyrics. Switchfoot's cds have always been ones that I can pick up and I love every songs, and this CD is no exception. // 10

Lyrics: I love Jon Foreman. He is so honest and you can really see his emotion shine through his songs. He speaks the truth to a world that has lost sight of how it got where it is today. In our world today, nothing really is sound, save Christ. I love how if you read Ecclesiastes in the Bible, and then listen to happy is a yuppie word, it is very apparent that he took from it. Jon and Tim really are in a league of their own when it comes to lyrics. I'm glad to see a band that has meaning to their songs. // 10

Overall Impression: I love this CD. From the beginning top the end, it is amazing. The Setting Sun is simply put, beautiful. Happy is a yuppie word is raw and honest, it makes me think and challenges me. Stars "makes me feel like myself," the blues is lazy, and lonely nation makes me wanting more. This CD makes me think of nature, and the beauty of God, funny how so many songs have title that deal with nature. If this CD was stolen or lost, I would have to buy it again. Because it is all I listen to. // 10

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overall: 7.7
Nothing Is Sound Reviewed by: unregistered, on october 31, 2005
1 of 4 people found this review helpful

Sound: It's an extension of their previous album's grungy alt-pop sound. There's very few acoustic numbers as compared to TBL. It's very much an autumn feel as opposed to the summer feel of the last album. There's kind of a rushed feel about the whole thing, however, like they're trying to fit a 90-minute show into 45 minutes. // 9

Lyrics: This is where the album loses some points with me. Jon seems to think he's got his ear to the socio-political grapevine, except that he doesn't quite. He tries to go with too much politics and not enough Jesus. He's trying to impress too many people. // 6

Overall Impression: This is the one that should have been titled The Beautiful Letdown, as that is exactly what it is. I had high expectations and was excited at the sound clips, but I judged the book by its cover. It has taken a few listen-throughs to genuinely like it. Still better than average, and its forgiveable seeing as this is its sophmore album as a megaband. // 8

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overall: 10
Nothing Is Sound Reviewed by: aquaknight3, on november 22, 2005
1 of 2 people found this review helpful

Sound: I think the sound of this album is awesome! The more I listen to any of the 12 songs, I start to like it more and more. Most artists come out will albums that get old after the few times you listen to it all the way through. Well, this one is different; the music hardly gets old fast. Listen carefully to each song, the music seems to have secrets of it's own that tell a story that goes right along with the lyrics. I give this a 10, not to be cheesey, but because I believe it deserves it. // 10

Lyrics: Jon Foreman simply writes wonderful music. Look closer at lyrics from songs like Daisy, Golden, The Blues, and Stars. It fills your mind with a million things he could be singing about. The music harmonizes perfectly with the words and goes along perfectly with the mood of the song. You can tell if the next song you listen to is going to be emotional, fun, or anything else before you get to the vocals and lyrics. It's a wonder how he does it. But ya know. I'd like to know how many question marks there are throughout all the lyrics. // 10

Overall Impression: My overall impression? "Nothing Is Sound" rocks. Everyone I know has this album and my band and I can play almost every song on it. A lot of people we perform for come up to us and tell us exactly which songs we played from them. I think Jon gets much more in-depth with his lyrics than in "The Beautiful Letdown." It really gets you thinking. Almost too much! Well, I know that there is one thing bad about this album though, it's hard to tab. // 10

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overall: 8.7
Nothing Is Sound Reviewed by: wild1610am, on november 24, 2005
1 of 3 people found this review helpful

Sound: The music on Nothing Is Sound is far better than any of their previous albums. They have removed most of their "artificial sweetener", mostly just guitar, drums and bass with the occasional piano (The Shadow Proves The Sunshine) are on this record. The first track "Lonely Nation" is harder than anything from Switchfoot before. Sonically, the strong points are "Lonely Nation," "Stars," "Easier Than Love" and "We Are One Tonite." They fall short however on "The Blues," this is a boring song overall with nothing really special. Definatly not what many have come to expect from a band like Switchfoot. However, the sound of Switchfoot is not what has so captivated listeners in the past or present. // 10

Lyrics: The lyrics are what drive the band. Jon Foreman's lyrics are amazing and so deep in thought and emotion. The song "Golden" has the most beautiful lyrics on the album. It is speaking to people that are feeling down on themselves, telling them that they are important and made perfect. "She's been staring down the demons in her mind that are screaming she's just another so and so, but your golden, a golden child, don't let go, don't let go tonight." All songs have excellent lyrics, typical of a Switchfoot album. You won't be disapointed atall by the content of lyrics. They are clean, encouraging and beautiful. However, the lyrics aren't as proficient as in "The Beautiful Letdown" or "Learning To Breathe." // 7

Overall Impression: This album is alot grittier than "The Beautiful Letdown" or "Learning To Breathe." The lyrics aren't as good the their previous efforts either, but the music is alot better. I love Jon Foreman's voice and his ability to write music. The one low point on this album is "The Blues," a rather disapointing song for this band. 01. Lonely Nation - gritty song, captures the "live" essence of the band 10/10. 02. Stars - the first single, great lyrics about how our problems seem so small when we think about the "big picture" in God's creation 10/10. 03. Happy Is A Yuppie Word - slightly repetitive, poor lyrics for Switchfoot, another low point on this album 6/10. 04. The Shadow Proves The Sunshine - very soft, pretty sounding song, the piano and Foreman's lyrics in this recording make it really nice to listen to and enjoy 9/10. 05. Easier Than Love - fast, upbeat song about how the world uses "sex as currency" in advertising. Very catchy chorus. Low point of this song is when foreman yells out the word "numb" after the chorus each time, it is slightly annoying 9/10. 06. The Blues - low point of the entire album, it is a very plain song with poor lyrics. Switchfoot has done many slower songs in the past and they sounded really beautiful, not the case in this one 3/10. 07. The Setting Sun - this track I found interesting. It goes away from the "live" sound of this album. It sounds alot like a song from the Beautiful Letdown like "More Than Fine" 7/10. 08. Politicians - another gritty track, really heavy guitar in this one, good lyrics in this one as well, catchy chorus 9/10. 09. Golden - my favroite song on this album. Beautiful lyrics, good song to listen to when you are feeling sad. It never fails to make you feel better. The chorus is wonderful 10/10. 10. The Fatal Wound - kind of a throw-in type of song, makes good use of a harmonica though 6/10. 11. We Are One Tonight - the musical talent of the band really shines in this one. It has great lyrics as well. It is quite a long song, but really good quality 10/10. 12. Daisy - a pretty song to start, just Foreman on an accoustic guitar. But it ends with a yelling foreman and a chaotic outro, which is un-called for in this song, they should have made this one a really slow, accoustic song 5/10. // 9

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overall: 10
Nothing Is Sound Reviewed by: unregistered, on september 14, 2005
0 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sound: Switchfoot is back again with their 5th album. The San Diego based Christian rock band has put everything they got into this album and it shows. Through-out there other 4 albums their sound has really begun to mature and this hard hitting rock album shows it. With powerful guitar riffs and headbanging drumb beats followed by a smooth bass line this album is perfect in every sense of the sound department. // 10

Lyrics: The lyrics are stronger than many of their other albums. I think Jon Foreman is one of perhaps the best rock vocalist out there and he can match any chord you can throw at him. Though the lryics are deep, they aren't as deep as most of Learning to Breathe, or about half of the Beautiful Letdown. They are catering to a larger audience now, so naturally some of their lyrics have turned that way as well, even so, I can still say flawless! // 10

Overall Impression: As for the way it compares to their other albums I'll definatley put it right up there with Learning to Breathe and The Beautiful Letdown. I'm sure with time it'll surpass both, because it truly is an amazing album. I can't yet pick a favorite song, but Stars, and Lonely Nation definatley rock out loud. A great album from a great band! // 10

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overall: 10
Nothing Is Sound Reviewed by: unregistered, on september 15, 2005
0 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sound: The sound on this CD is different than the others in that it has a heavier tone in the harder songs. The sound is about the same when it comes to the lighter songs. The sound is just unbelievable in my opinion in this record with awesome riffs and nice melodic cords. // 10

Lyrics: The lyrics of this CD are very good as they blend really welll with the music, although Switchfoot's lyrics have always been good in all of thir CDs. // 10

Overall Impression: This is right up with being the best album they have release so far, right next to the beautiful letdown. Politicians and happy is a yuppie word are the best songs on the cd in my opinion. The CD is just awesome. If it was stolen or lost, I would sure buy another one. // 10

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overall: 10
Nothing Is Sound Reviewed by: Stealthbass, on december 12, 2005
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: The sound of this CD is much higher than the Beautiful Letdown. This CD is pop/rock with Christian rock mixed in. They combine a way better melodic sound in this album. Each part and instrument is brought out soo much more in this one. They have a harder punch and a bigger effect on drawing in crowds of people. It flows much nicer. The bass is much more pronounced and the guitars have a bigger variety of sounds. // 10

Lyrics: The lyrics are better too. They fit the music better. They are even more energetic. They are far less repetitive and are covering a better circumference. They aren't all the same like before. You can hear them better. Jon has improved on his skills and it has shown in this CD. His lyrics are some of my favorite. // 10

Overall Impression: This CD is much higher than normal pop-rock CDs. They put more work into this CD. The most impressive songs from this cd are: Lonely Nation, Easier Than Love, and Politicians. I love the blend of each instrument and the melodic lyrics. Their isn't any bad part of this CD. If it were stolen/lost I would definitely buy it back. // 10

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overall: 9.7
Nothing Is Sound Reviewed by: RachelRC, on march 11, 2006
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Sound: I've always loved Switchfoot because they push the boundaries with their sound, they don't settle for a "rock" sound or an "indie" sound, they do whatever they feel is good for each song and I believe that's the way to do it instead of making every song sound the same. I was really looking forward to this album because I got a taste of it live because they made it while on the road and then played the new songs for the audience to test them out. I was excited to hear the studio versions of songs like "Daisy" which had been out for a little while before as an acoustic radio show performance. // 10

Lyrics: Jon Foreman is my favorite lyricist, his words are true and maybe sometimes cliche but they're honest and he writes from what he knows. Asking questions like "Where is my soul?" and "Are there any left who haven't kiss the enemy?" are the greatest things about these songs, I like his socratic method that is in a lot of Switchfoot's songs. I've always looked up to Jon Foreman and I love his voice and the way he sings on certain songs. I like the fact that he always has emotion in his voice, you know that what he is singing is what he really means and that's he's being true. // 9

Overall Impression: When Switchfoot makes an album, they make an album. You truly can't find another artist that even compares to Switchfoot. My favorite songs on this CD are "Golden," "Setting Sun," "Politicians" and "The Blues," completely honest songs with words of hope and change. I love that Switchfoot put a song like "Politicians" on this record, even though it is not aimed at politicians, more so at ourselves and how we are, I feel like it's one of the strongest rock songs I've ever heard. When you hear a sound like Switchfoot's, you know right of the bat that there's nothing else like it. Jon Foreman is an incredible singer and man. His words are intelligent, unique, and honest and that's what our lead singers need to be these days; honest. I feel that this is one of the best records of the year. // 10

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overall: 8.3
Nothing Is Sound Reviewed by: ZeppelinFan3890, on april 28, 2006
0 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sound: Nothing Is Sound is Switchfoot's follow-up album to The Beautiful Letdown, which broke them into the mainstream with singles Dare You To Move and Meant To Live. Nothing Is Sound is a good follow-up to Letdown, sounding much like it. This is both good and bad. It continues Switchfoot's sound that they do well, but does not bring much new to the table. The highlight songs of the album are their two mainstream hits (so far) "Stars" and "We Are One Tonight." Possibly the best thing about this album is that all the heavier songs are extremely catchy and will get stuck in your head for days. "Politicans" was in my head for awhile. In additon to these songs, the album offers slower ballads. Some of these are enjoyable, and others don't really do much. Switchfoot is clearly better with the more upbeat songs. Overall, the album's sound is good, and the order of songs is unique, transitioning from fast to slow songs. It works. // 8

Lyrics: Many people do not know, but Switchfoot can be considered a Christian band, with allusions to God in their music. Their lyrics range in meaning, going from looking at the stars to the efficiency of sex compared to love. Nevertheless, Jonathan Foreman is a great songwriter, and his voice fits with all twelve songs on the album. The words appropriately give the music emotion and Foreman leads the band wonderfully. Overall, some of the better lyrics you'll see these days. // 9

Overall Impression: Nothing Is Sound is chapter two of Switchfoot's mainstream era, even though it is their fifth album. Like I said earlier, it is in a sense The Beautiful Letdown Part Two, but it is a great album nevertheless. It's not superspectacular, but it's better than the majority of music you will find out there these days. It's a good album to listen to pretty much anytime, and a good diversity of songs exists that will satisfy a wide variety of listeners. If this album was stolen, I would definitely buy it back, and bitchslap the guy who stole it from me. // 8

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overall: 9.7
Nothing Is Sound Reviewed by: Learn_to_fly, on april 28, 2006
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Sound: Their sound has grown since Legend Of Chin, and it has proven that these guys know what it takes to progress as a band soundwise. Of course, doing this tends to alienate their original faithful fans, and also sound always seems to become more pop-influenced to reach more audiences. I, as one of their old fans, am happy to say Switchfoot did neither. I've been to listening to their songs since early days, and unlike the stereotyped attitude on this site, I actually prefer their new stuff. While songs like "Let That Be Enough" and "The Loser" may stay with me forever, it's songs like "Lonely Nation" and "Stars" that really make you appreciate how far they've come. Carrying on from the stlyle of "A Beautiful Letdown", the sound is a lot more rocky. There is no other way to describe change from a surfer/garage band to a multi-platinum stadium band. The single "Stars" is no doubt the most hardcore song on the album, followed closely by the riffs of "Polititians" and "Easier Than Love", and the rythm of "Lonely Nations" and the pop beat of "We Are One Tonight". Although there aren't as many ballads as ABL, Nothing Is Sound provides with quality in the form of "The Blues", and "Daisy". Although not as good as beautiful "24" in ABL, these slow songs really reflect the overall theme of the album, and the piano compliments the lyrics and John's voice. // 10

Lyrics: A lot of christian bands these days are critized of only making music so they can sing over it - saying that the 'message matters more than the music'. This is the last phrase I would use to describe Switchfoot. While their music is crafted carefully, it is not written for the lyrics, nor is it a second priority. Their lyrics, even though they blend in marvelously with the music, are also treated separetely. In saying that, what makes a good lyricist? I have found that a goodsongwriter is not someone who you agree with, but someone who manages to pen his/her thoughts in such a way that it makes us think and it challenges us to see things from other percpectives. Writers also question life and existence itself, which is exactly what John does best. He questions himself about why we're here and does it in such a way that we can't help but wonder - even if he does answer himself by the end of the song. Unlike the previous album however, this record seems to be the darkest record these boys have made. As the name of the record implies, this album is about how twisted and flawed our beautiful world is. What will be left "when the world caves in?" (The Blues), they "pledge allegience to the country with no politicians" (Politicians), and "everyone you look so lonely, so empty" (Stars). // 9

Overall Impression: Their best album? Yes. Best album of the year? One of them. For everyone? No. For all you people who can't stand christians, I still encourage you to listen to this, as it's the music that counts (well, to you anyway). As for everyone else, buy this CD, put your stereo to 11, and get ready for Switchfoot to rock your world. If you're the same person before and after you listen to this record, you're a retard. // 10

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