Róka Hasa Rádió Review

artist: Thy Catafalque date: 04/07/2010 category: compact discs
Thy Catafalque: Róka Hasa Rádió
Released: Apr 2009
Genre: Avant-garde metal, Post-Black metal, Folk metal
Label: Epidemie Records, Soyuz Music
Number Of Tracks: 9
This album is pretty unique in it's styling, has the dark atmosphere of black metal but with some keyboard melodies that often border on cheesiness, which isn't helped by the sounds used for them.
 Sound: 7
 Lyrics: 6
 Overall Impression: 6
 Overall rating:
 6.3 
 Reviewer rating:
 6.3 
 Users rating:
 6.3 
 Votes:
 7 
review (1) 7 comments vote for this album:
overall: 6.3
Róka Hasa Rádió Reviewed by: metallicafan616, on april 07, 2010
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: This album is pretty unique in it's styling, has the dark atmosphere of black metal but with some keyboard melodies that often border on cheesiness, which isn't helped by the sounds used for them. Some of the songs are quite heavy with sections that upon first listen sound like pure noise, others that sound like cheesy music from space and parts that even sound like pop music. It's quite varied to say the least. The band is Hungarian, so despite there being an apparent concept to the story - I don't actually know what that is. Something about a Radio and the Universe. It's quite hard to describe the actual sound of the band without you having heard it - but like all Avant-Garde music it's mostly a love or hate kind of thing. The instrumentation aside from keyboards and synths can be a bit unclear at times, the bass and guitars are very fuzzy and over distorted whilst the drums can be a bit hard to hear sometimes. However, they contrast the keys very well - although at times the simplicity can be tedious. // 7

Lyrics: There are many different vocal styles used on this album. Each and every one of them is perfect. The calm female singing is so sweet it almost sounds like pop music, the rasps and other noises sound awesome and unique at the same time - despite not being the best I've heard. There's also some clean male singing which is great in it's own way too. As I previously mentioned, the band is Hungarian, so it's hard for me to comment on the lyrics. However, using google translate to get a rough idea, I can tell you easily: The lyrics are ridiculous. Űrhajk Makn's lyrics are about wizards as yellow as the moon invading from space or something. Seriously, Tams Ktai, what were you thinking? Granted, so long as you don't understand them the sound of the syllables is fun to listen to, so it works in my ears. // 6

Overall Impression: I can't think of a single album similar, even their previous efforts were quite different. The best songs would be the first Szervetlen and third Kd Utnam. The atmosphere is very consistent throughout the album and Tams Ktai is hopefully on the way to a promising career, but this is definitely no Magnum Opus. The fourth song Űrhajk Makn seems to have thought 'this sound is unprecedented, it must be included on the album!' because of the majority of metalheads ignorance towards pop music and thus not realising that it actually sounds like cheesy pop in the middle of an experimental black metal album. If it we're lost or stolen I'd probably buy it again eventually, but other Avant Garde albums are higher up on my list than this album. Listen before buying - hell, if nothing else it could act as a link straight from pop music to black metal! // 6

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