Define The Great Line Review

artist: underoath date: 11/08/2010 category: compact discs
underoath: Define The Great Line
Release Date: Jun 20, 2006
Label: Tooth & Nail
Genres: Post-Hardcore, Screamo, Christian Metal
Number Of Tracks: 11
"Define The Great Line" further establishes Underoath as one of the most important and influential bands in rock music today.
 Sound: 9.3
 Lyrics: 9.3
 Overall Impression: 9.4
 Overall rating:
 9 
 Reviewer rating:
 9.3 
 Users rating:
 8.7 
 Votes:
 325 
reviews (26) 144 comments vote for this album:
overall: 9
Define The Great Line Reviewed by: xtrueparallels, on june 22, 2006
17 of 19 people found this review helpful

Sound: The first thing you will recognize about this album is that it takes us back to the old days, old Underoath. It breaks away from the melodic, catchy songs on You're Only Chasing Safety to some heavy stuff that ultimately shaped Underoath from the beginning. This album is much heavier without a doubt, and maybe Underoath will even lose fans over this? Reguardless, Define The Great Line is truely Underoath, not some studio over-done, watered down, poppy album as You're Only Chasing Safety was turning out to be. Even after turning it up a noch, Underoath was still able to call upon their roots and remain a very much Christian band. The album title alone is based upon the fact that everyone has a "line" they follow each and everyday. It doesn't nessasarily mean we have everything figured out, it just means that it is where you want to be, and how you plan to better yourself as a human being. You are constantly falling off it, and it's about knowing at the end of the day, how to get back on it. But even the 5th track on the album, Salmamir, Psalm 50 is read in Russian. Apparently Underoath is one ofthose bands that just always loves to try something new, but never forget where you come from or what you stand for. // 10

Lyrics: I think Spencer is still an amazing vocalist. Simply put, he always brings it. On Define the Great Line, you can tell he has grown as a singer and he has a lot less singing than their previous release. This cd is mostly his harsh, passionate, screaming that I have come to love. Except this time around, he has developed quite a range. As for the lyrics, they're great. They talk abot self-confrontation and freaking out when the world is about to end. They're about saying things and doing things before it's too late and defining that line you live upon. // 8

Overall Impression: As I said before, this album is very much like The Changing Of Times. It's very heavy and not quite as sing-along as You're Only Chasing Safety was. It's a different turn in the road for Underoath, but I think it is a very good move. My personal favorite songs on the album are probably A Moment Suspended In Time and Writing On the Walls. But don't get me wrong, they're all good. And for once, I don't think there was a track I didn't like, except for maybe Everyone Looks So Good From Here. If some jerk stole this CD, I wouldn't buy another one because I already have it uploaded and in the iPod. They're amazing little things, when they aren't broken, aren't they? // 9

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overall: 9.3
Define The Great Line Reviewed by: Zamboni, on june 23, 2006
2 of 2 people found this review helpful

Sound: Underoath has very clearly matured and developed their sound on Define The Great Line. With intriguing guitar riffs and interwoven melodies, they compliment the general harshness and "punch-in-the-gut" style music Underoath is famous for. Define The Great Line is also a two-part release: the regular edition CD, plus a special edition CD/DVD combo featuring a "making-of" documentary. // 9

Lyrics: Spencer's lyrics are always above average for his genre. And the combo of him and Aaron on vocals is a welcome sound, the mix of harsh screams and smooth vocal melodies. It's good to hear that Spencer has reverted to his original screaming style, instead of a Dallas Taylor-style imitation, reminiscint of his old band This Runs Through. With deeper growls and a generally more emotional touch, this is his best recorded effort to-date. // 10

Overall Impression: This is, without question, Underoath's most hailed effort, and it lives up to it's hype. With the evolved sound of Underoath's music, coupled with Spencer's insane screams, this may be the band's best album. If lost or stolen, I would rebuy in an instant, if not just for the music, but the amazing album art and DVD. // 9

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overall: 10
Define The Great Line Reviewed by: yumoses, on july 20, 2006
2 of 2 people found this review helpful

Sound: Their sound has moved from that 'popcore' sound to an awesome metal essence. I showed a friend who's been an Underoath fan for a while and he didn't recognize them at first, all he said was 'these guys are metalcore!' But what defines alot of this album is it's not just heavy music the whole way through. Tracks like Salmarnir, Casting Such A Thin Shadow, and To Whom It May Concern, all show the emotional side of the band's instrumentals. Also, the use of an e-bow on the guitar tracks for the latter two added a great effect. The way that Tim, Grant, and James put together the strings riff's in more of a style like The Chariot or Norma Jean is too cool. Aaron's drumming is like wow. Returning Empty Handed is a handful just to listen to all the different hit's he's making. Then Spencer's vox have gone from that screamo to the full on hardcore growl, reminiscent of Tim Lambesis from As I Lay Dying. Accompanied by Aaron's higher punk voice, the two never seem to clash but work together great. Overall sound is a great improval, although They're Only Chasing Safety was a great album too. // 10

Lyrics: Right away, I saw the lyrics in this album were well thought out and full of meaning. None of the songs disappointed this thought. Like To Whom It May Concern's lyrics are all about keeping your head up (as far as the intro with Aaron), which is great for all the kids experiencing depression. Music is a huge part of culture nowadays, and these guys are setting it all out in the right way. It's so cool Underoath is moving up and getting into the mainstream, with lyrics like what they have on Define, they're certain to have a good effect. // 10

Overall Impression: This album definitely has a metal feel, even more of a core feel to it, which is awesome. Spencer's vocals compare mostly to Tim Lambesis of As I Lay Dying, and Matt Heafy from Trivium. The string instrumentals compare I'd say to The Chariot or Norma Jean (who Josh Scogin shaped both, maybe he's got an effect). The drums on this album are killer, Aaron is a crazy drummer. Songs like Returning Empty Handed (my personal fav), Moving For The Sake Of Motion, and In Regards To Myself are the heaviest tracks of the album. The intro riff on Regards is complete reminiscence of Norma Jean. To me, it's too cool that they're staying with their hardcore/metal roots and still taking a huge part in the music scene. // 10

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overall: 9
Define The Great Line Reviewed by: shugo449, on january 17, 2007
2 of 2 people found this review helpful

Sound: On Define The Great Line, Underoath is as screamy, distorted, and reckless as ever. Right from the first track ("In Regards To Myself"), after a little humming, your already being bombarded by their sonic onslaught. Spencer's screaming is great, and the dual guitar work is amazing. So precise, and they have a lot of weird little melodies. My favorite tracks are "Everyone Looks so Good From Here", "In Regards To Myself", and "Writting On The Walls". The sound of the band is awesome, and all of the vocal trade offs (a screamer and a singer) are real cool to. // 8

Lyrics: On this disc, Underoath scream in despair, but they also have a lot of insight and hope. The Christian act depicts terrible times, but not without explaining how to get through them. On "To Whom It May Concern", the seven minute ender, sings of holdign your head high and moving on, a unlikely thing from a screamo album. // 10

Overall Impression: Underoath have a real cool sound. They son't really sound like anyone does. They mix it up a lot with two screamers(in which Atreyu took the idea from) and have real cool sounding down tuned guitars. These guys are amazing, and they also have positive messages to cling on to. If I lost this, I would buy it again. One of the best CDs in my collection. For any hardcore screamo fan get this. For anyone wanting to branch out into screamo, get this or Their Only Chasing Safety, their previous album to this. // 9

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overall: 10
Define The Great Line Reviewed by: unregistered, on june 21, 2007
1 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sound: Define the Great Line is my favorite Underoath album to date. The style takes you back to the roots this band was originally founded on. If you're expecting a sequel to They're Only Chasing Safety, you won't find it here. The new album is characteristically heavier, more dissonant and more passionate than its predecessors. The first track, In Regards to Myself establishes from the first second, the dissonant heaviness that is the backbone to the album. Overall, the sound seems completely new and familiar at the same time. Honestly, it will take two or three listen-throughs for the music to really catch on to your ears. // 10

Lyrics: Spencer's lyrics this time through really impressed me. He mentioned in an interview that with They're Only Chasing Safety, he was sort of put in the spot and his lack of comfort prevented him from exploring as much as he would have. This time around, Spencer has clearly come around with lyrics inspired by events in his own life. Spencer's lyrics describe the struggle within and dark situations, but sheds light on what we need to do as individuals to save ourselves. The band's christian nature shines through as Spencer explores topics including the end of the world and finding meaning in life. Spencer's vocal ability has clearly grown along with his comfort level, as made apparent by his greatly increased range. You will find screeching screams accompanied with gutteral bellows and half-singing-half-screeming vocals laid throughout the CD, much reminiscent of Spencer's performances with his previous band, This Runs Through. And as always, Aaraon delivers on the sing-a-long hooks. // 10

Overall Impression: Define the Great Line reflects Underoath's evolution as a band and the simultaneous return to their roots. The best songs on this album are In Regards to Myself, You're Ever so Inviting, and There Could be Nothing After This. Their first single, Writing on the Walls is the closest song to anything you heard on They're Only Chasing Safety, if that's what you're looking for. When I heard the album for the first time, I thought it was alright and I put it away for about two days. Then I felt the need to listen to it again, and that time I enjoyed it a little more. This process continued and now I can't believe how remarkable and amazing this album really is. I can easily say that it is one of the best and most impressive albums I have bought in the last 10 years. A true keeper, go out and do yourselves a favor and buy it. // 10

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overall: 10
Define The Great Line Reviewed by: redfalcon431, on october 11, 2007
1 of 2 people found this review helpful

Sound: So I bought this CD way back in like 7th grade when it first came out. At the time, I wasn't into screamo and I didn't care much for it. I saw the commercial for it on Fuse and for some reason I had the impulse to get it to see what this band was about because I loved the song on the commercial (Writings On The Wall). I listened to the CD and was shocked. This CD was something different than I had ever heard. I gradually listened to it more and more and by now it is one of my favorite CDs of all time. I read or saw an interview with Underoath and they said that they didn't want people to love their songs immediately but for it to kind of grow on you and learn to love the music. This statement was so true because they steer clear of the pop rock music that people listen to nowadays. The sound goes from very smooth and calm like in Salamarnir to aggresive and energetic in the opener, In Regards To Myself. The sound was very new to me but very driving and melodic. The dissonance used is not irritating but powerful in it's usage throughout the CD. Overall, this CD has accomplished being very new and different and in a good way. // 10

Lyrics: Underoath's lyrics are always very deep and are appealing to the emotions. They are christian but they sing about different things that they are feeling. The first song, In Regards To Myself opens to fire the listener up with screaming and perfect, convicting lyrics. The singer, Spencer Chamberlain, is obviously one of the best screamers out there and to counter the screaming with his high, melodic voice is Aaron Gillespie. The two make one of the best vocal duos out there. // 10

Overall Impression: Underoath has become my favorite band through this CD. The whole CD is amazing but my favorites are In Regards to Myself, You're Ever So Inviting, and Everyone Looks So Good From Here. This CD is less mainstream than their preceding CD "They're Only Chasing Safety" but almost expands on it on a deeper level. I happened to get lucky and the Special Edition with the DVD was on sale and was cheaper than the normal album price. // 10

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overall: 8.7
Define The Great Line Reviewed by: bTOMd, on june 22, 2006
0 of 4 people found this review helpful

Sound: I heard this album is supposed to be somewhat about a man before he dies. I'm usually not into this screamo music but theres something about these guys that I think are different and I don't even know what is different. I like that there are some more ambient/instrumental parts in the songs too that breaks up the screaming and helps the CD flow better. // 8

Lyrics: They're very spiritually based and even though the music sounds very angry it is still uplifting. Sometimes when there is just regular singing it is a bit too whiney but most of the time it is just right. // 9

Overall Impression: The songs I like the best are "To Whom It May Concern","In Regards To Myself" and "Salmarnir" just for a different flow of pace. If I lost it I probably wouldn't buy it again but I wouldn't for any other CD I own either so thats not saying much. I would like to hear some of their earlier music when they started too. // 9

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overall: 10
Define The Great Line Reviewed by: th4t_1_k!d, on june 26, 2006
0 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sound: Underoath has always had a great rock sound, and they brought even more to this album. The guitars and drums sound better than ever and Spencer has developed a more controled sound to his screaming. This CD is one of Underoath's best, definitly surpassing Chasing Safety. // 10

Lyrics: Spencer doesn't just do high screaming this time around but also does low screaming which seems to fit perfectly. Aaron also has a great sound on this album. // 10

Overall Impression: In my opinion, this cd is way better than Chasing Safety. The best songs on the album are probably In Regards To Myself, There Could Be Nothing After This, You're Ever So Inviting, Moving For The Sake Of Motion, and Writing On The Walls. I have always been a fan of Underoath, and I love the new album. If it were stolen, I might actually be kind of happy because then I could go buy the deluxe edition. // 10

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overall: 10
Define The Great Line Reviewed by: ClassicDisaster, on june 29, 2006
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: Well, Underoath is harder again. Not Acts of Depression hard, but this cd is definately not They're Only Chasing Safety. It's somewhere in between screamo and hardcore. When I first put it in the cd player, I thought it was Norma Jean. On the albulm they do keep some of the elements from They're Only Chasing Safety by throwing in melodies in every song, but it's great stuff, ranging from crazy Norma Jean like songs to soft 7 minute ballads. // 10

Lyrics: Great lyrics as always from Underaoth. They're basically about our life and where we draw the line on deciding what to and not to do (I don't know exactly watch the dvd that comes with the special edition Spencer tells you). Aaorn's voice has only gotten better, and Spencer's scream ranges from his distinctive high pitch shriek to some deeper, throaty metal screams. // 10

Overall Impression: I love this CD. I'm a fan of their old stuff, and out of all of Underoath's cd's, this is the best, because it shows show much range. Every song is impressive and memorable in it's own right. If I had to pick a best song, it's a tie between "In Regards To Myself" and "To Whom It May Concern," though I love every song. I love how they can be pretty crazy and then pull back with a nice harmony. If something happened to it, I would buy 5 more copies so I would always have one. // 10

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overall: 10
Define The Great Line Reviewed by: guitardo19, on june 29, 2006
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: I've come to find that Underoath is not only truly annointed by God, but on this album they proved it to the world. Not only has Spencer grown vastly in the screaming arts, but as well as the deep tones. When I first heared this album the first thing that popped in my head was where the heck did the piano go? I mean he's still there but this cd I feel was based a lot more on heavy guitars and they did a dang good job at it. I honestly don't really remembering the old Underoath sounding like this. Sometimes I'll be honest it was like they were repeating the same riffs over and over again. Don't get me wrong I love Underoath, but Define The Great Line is by far hands down, no contest the best Underoath Yet. More screaming alot less singing then on They're Only Chasing Safety. This album not only defines the Great Line, but it also defines metal, not screamo such as TOCS. This time they like what they did. // 10

Lyrics: The Lyrics are very deep and powerful for anyone who has been in a situation when they feel if God is even there. Everyone gets it. But Underoath's lyrics are always compforting because it tells you that someone else hurts the same you do, and That Our Lord Jesus Christ will see you through anything. The screamer Spencer spills his guts out onto the mic while Aaron has the emo voice to keep any depressed kid happy. And the strength in the throat's of both vocalists is so destructive it matches perfectly with the heavy guitars. // 10

Overall Impression: Personally I hate absolutely no songs whatsoever on this album because they are all so moving. My personal fav. is In Regards To Myself, Returning Empty Handed, Moving For The Sake Of Motion, and Writing On The Walls. I love the complexity that Tim and James have brought out on Define The Great Line. Like on songs such as Casting Such A Thin Shadow, and Everyone Looks So Good From Here. If this CD was jacked from me it's so worth buying 9 times over again. // 10

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overall: 10
Define The Great Line Reviewed by: Ambulance X, on june 30, 2006
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: Imagine Norma Jean meets Spencer Chamberlain's old band This Runs Through with hints of Every Time I Die and you have Define the Great Line. After the poppiness of They're Only Chasing Safety (the poppiness being a pre-cautionary move on the part of the original band members), Underoath has found their sound with Spencer. Spencer's vocals are no longer the same monotonous high screams and now he really shows off his range and improves upon his vocals in This Runs Through. His vocals range from a shrill scream to a mind-blowing guttural scream. Guitarists Tim McTague and James Smith have also grown up on this album. Their guitar style is so heavy, I was surprised to learn they didn't downtune to Drop C. They make good use of dissonance chords, especially dissonance chords on the A and D strings. The guitar style combines parts of The Changing of Times and They're Only Chasing Safety and include hints of Norma Jean and Every Time I Die. The band has really grown up and proven themselves capable of developing a sound all their own. // 10

Lyrics: The lyrics are a lot less poppy in this album and have a darker, more mature nature. UnderOATH uses drummer Aaron Gillespie a lot less as a singer in this album and Spencer really shows off his range. The vocals are probably the best part of this album. // 10

Overall Impression: Underoath has proven themselves able to produce a sound outside the faceless, corporate popcore that plagues the music industry right now. This easily exceeds any of their previous works and is a stunner. This is easily an album of the year contender and it left me and I'm sure everyone else pleasantly surprised. // 10

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overall: 9.7
Define The Great Line Reviewed by: MachineHeart, on july 05, 2006
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: Amazing. I was one of the dudes that got the cd two months before it came out, and when I got it, I started listening to it in chem class. Hearing the first track (in regards to myself) I almost started screaming my freakin head off I was so excited. theyve changed from post hardcore to more heavier stuff, to the sounds of every time I die, and norma jean (although not that heavy). the second the actual album came out, I bought it, and the album is ten times better than the burned version. // 10

Lyrics: The lyrics are good. not amazing, but decent. I happen to be an avid follower of Keith Buckley (ETID) and his lyric style, so it takes a lot to impress me, but these aren't like horrible. They're decent. I was actually expecting complete bullshit vocals after hearing him live, and seeing how he couldn't reach his "they're only chasing saftey" high pitch scream. But now he has discoverd an enormous range, from his past high scream to his crazy growling lows. // 9

Overall Impression: This album is one of a kind. I believe underoath made a very smart move, seeing there increasing popularity and creating a very underground sounding album. It makes me wanna cry they did so good. The only thing that would make me happy is to see that little emo kid getting the new album thinking its gonna be like the old one, and hearing this pluthera of noise. // 10

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overall: 9.3
Define The Great Line Reviewed by: The Spoon, on july 11, 2006
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: Wow! That was the first thing I thought when I heard the first song. This album definately sounds different. In a good way. The guitar players really came through. This album is so much more metal than their last. Some of the studio effects in this album also add a really nice touch to the CD. // 9

Lyrics: The lyrics are pretty good. I noticed how they use say "God" a lot more in this album. I love the little chorus thing in 'In Regards to Myself' where the drummer and singer scream "Pull Yourself Together! Pull yourself yogether man! What are you so afraid of?" There are lots of songs that make you wanna stand up, and sing with them as loud as you can. The main singer's screaming voice is much different from "They're Only Chasing Safety". It sounds so much better and darker. The drummer's voice also adds an amazing affect to the songs. // 10

Overall Impression: Overall, this CD is, in my opinion, some of Underoaths best. That just happens to be because I became a believer when I heard 'They're only Chasing Safety'. This CD is a change for the better. And its so much better. The only thing I really dont like about the album is the song 'Salmarnir'. I'm not sure if there's some special meaning behind it, but I cant really here any singing. Just talking. Same with 'Casting Such a Thin Shadow'. That has singing, its just 5 minutes of it is guitar playing and drums. Best songs of the album have to be 'In Regards To Myself', 'A Moment Suspended in Time', 'You're Ever So Inviting, 'Moving for the Sake of Motion', and 'Writing on the Walls'. The thought of losing this CD makes me want to burn 40 or 50 copies of it. Or maybe if it got stolen, id buy the CD/DVD version. This album is oh so satisfying. // 9

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overall: 5.7
Define The Great Line Reviewed by: gano22perez, on august 07, 2006
0 of 3 people found this review helpful

Sound: This time around you can really tell this Christian rock band means business, they have progressively became more hardcore and have pounded out more phenomenal riffs and powerchords that drive the soul to crindging in a good way. The level of frustration at one's own self is felt through Spencer's vocals, but the true message is that we need to quit joking ourselves and get it right with Jesus, especially with all the scriptures which foretell the future in the Bible coming to life in todays mideast war and Israel and Russia and Syria (EZEKIEL 38:39). Read is you will see the resembelance Gog and Magog = Russia! // 5

Lyrics: They all have the same inner struggles with overcoming something or someone you know is right or wrong, you have to make the judgement that will later be judged upon yourself by a higher being, and with lyrics like "I hope to God you" sends a message from the angels to reach out to all kinds of genre's such as this Hardcore heavy metal album. // 5

Overall Impression: I think this album will take at least 2 times to grow on you if you were expecting "They're Only Chasing Safety Part 2" but you will see and succumb to the heavier more forceful art of "Define The Great Line." The DVD is a plus if you bought it that way, it is a really behind the scenes to the guys or Underoath, You can find out how Different and How The Same The Guys Of The Band Are, it's amazing on how they all mesh together to become this epic, evangelestic source of outreach to todays war driven youth. // 7

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overall: 9.7
Define The Great Line Reviewed by: AVA_182_44, on august 31, 2006
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: Underoath owns! I love Underoath, they're my favorite band of all time, and "Define The Great Line" definalty contributed to my love. I don't even know what genre to classify them in, Metal? Christin? Screamo? And don't you dare suggest emo, I will slap you in public if you call Underoath emo. They are so far from emo, this is by far their best CD yet. Right next to "They're Only Chasing Safety" Underoath has changed so much from their first two cds, "Act Of Depression" and "Cries Of The Past" which are both still unbelivably great, but I love their new sound more. // 9

Lyrics: Aaron, (clear vocals/drummer)and Spencer (lead, throat vocals) is gifted in what they do. They write beautiful, moving lyrics that you would never know how beautiful they are in the awesome screaming Specer does. When you know what the lyrics are, you'll find that the song has a much deeper meaning then what you're listening to. They have the best lyrics in all of the bands I know. The vocals go hand in hand with the metalcore guitar, bass, and drums. Aaron has a very moving, soothing, calming voice that will relate you to the song, then Spencer's screaming will make you come back for more. Even if you're not a current fan of Underoath, and you really give them a chance, you will love their new CD. // 10

Overall Impression: "Define The Great Line" compares most to their previous album "They're Only Chasing Safety" If you were to listen to "Cries Of The Past" or "Act Of Depression" you'll see that they're talents has expanded and broadend. (Even though they now have different members) I hope that their albums continue to grow more popular, because everyone I know who's never heard of Underoath, then listened to them, loved them shortly after. My favorite songs on "Define The Great Line" are "Writing On The Walls" (of course) "In Regards To Myself," "Everyone Looks So Good From Here" and "They're Could Be Nothing After This." There's not one thing I don't like about the album. I strongly suggest you buy this album, because if you took the time to read this, I know for a fact you will love it. // 10

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overall: 8.7
Define The Great Line Reviewed by: Latino Heat, on october 16, 2006
0 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sound: I bet this album has already been listened to by probably a gillion people, but it still impresses me. I really don't take an interest in chritian-rock, but I really like this. The whole album is full of great sound, I mean, You listen to it and you're thinkin to yourself 'wow'. The guitar playing is supurb, or at least I think so. I've just recently listened to (and purchased) this album, and what caught my attention was the fact that the band sounded like they wanted you to take an interest in their album. Me and my friends really enjoyed listening to it in the weight room, it's full of hardcore beats that will get your adrenaline rushing. // 9

Lyrics: This band is a screamer band, so people really wouldn't be able to figure that this band was devoted to God, because of all the heavy metal style playing, but you listen to this guy and you really feel him. He has a very clean style scream, and when he does his thing, you want to get up and do a karoke along to the song. There are a few lyrics that I really liked, but I really liked them when it was all put together along to the music, I mean, it all fell into place. I only have a few things to say, the screamer is very good, and I don't know if he does the singing also, but the vocalist had a very nice voice. // 8

Overall Impression: I think this album will take a good run along with other bands that are selling real good, ther's only one problem with the overall album, not enough tracks(there are only 11). Another thing is that the band has one song that really makes you think that the rest of the album is gonna be relly lame. I don't know what it was, I don't know if was just an instrumental or somethin' else, all I know is that it bored the hell out of me and I didn't to the whole thing. Another flaw in the album was that some of the songs took to long to start off, and I need a song that will catch my attention fast. Besides all of the negatives, the album was freakin' awesome. I suggest that you go out and buy it yourself and see what I'm talkin about, and if you do, listen for the first song on the album, it's the best song of the CD. // 9

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overall: 9.3
Define The Great Line Reviewed by: sparkierguitar9, on december 25, 2006
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Sound: Underoath (apologises for inability to cross his o's) is possibly one of the most infuential bands on the circuit right now, and it's amazing how few people realise this. I'm in awe of everything that Underoath has produced, and from the times of Dallas Taylor to Spencer's new vocals, their sounds has changed and evolved into a creature that's frightening as much as it is spectacular. Sound-wise, Define The Great Line does deviate from They're Only Chasing Safety, and though it swings back to the harder darker past albums of Underoath (Acts Of Depression etc.) it's hardly the same. The talent is amazing, the guitars are far from the ordinary "power chord for this guy and riff for this guy" of todays music. It's intense and in your face, and you can feel the passion. The bass however, is hardly present except on a few songs such as 'Casting Such A Thin Shadow' (one of my favorites). Drums are typical of Aaron Gillipsie, the typical thing being the most powerful talented drumming possibly. Aaron has less of a vocal presence on this album, but that's okay because someone makes up for it. What can I say about Spencer? The lead vocalist, Spencer has grown so much since They're Only Chasing Safety. He's a new man with a new set of vocal chords that can't be matched by anyone. 'There Could Be Nothing After This' is the song that best testaments his abilities, and yeah, from what I can tell, he can actually sing too. They've put more work into this album then many bands I've ever seen. They're inhuman in concert. And their sound (though it may turn off some older fans) has become a force of it's own to be reckoned with. // 10

Lyrics: Lyrics are deeper then I've seen since the Dallas Taylor days. From what I can tell, it is the story of a man wandering, trying to find the truth. But I'm not a poet, and I'm not Spencer or Aaron. The lyrics go with the music well. Not perfect, but well. If it was just Spencer singing (singing, not screaming) I would say great. I love Aaron, and his vocals, but they've lost effect. Spencer is amazing on stage, he doesn't even have to sing well, he's got the best stage presence of anyone I've ever seen, ever. It probably has something to do with being a devout christian, and that makes him so much more inspirational. I especially liked his jab at Fat Mike (From NoFX). // 8

Overall Impression: Overall, they are the best thing I have music wise. They may not be the most talented, and my mom may cringe everytime she hears them. "Turn off that devil music!" "Uh mom, it's a christian band." They have their faults, but there are none I can clearly state. My choice songs are: There Could Be Nothing After This, Casting Such a Thin Shadow, Moving For The Sake Of Motion and Returning Empty Handed. I don't recommend getting the DVD/CD combo however, unless you can get it cheaper then the CD (I did). // 10

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overall: 9.3
Define The Great Line Reviewed by: screamokid, on may 17, 2007
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Sound: Heavy guitars, drums, and vocals are a familiar sound when you are listening to Underoath. In Define The Great Line, Underoath shows that you don't have to be 100% screaming to make a good Post-Hardcore CD. With songs with no vocals in Salamarnir and an almost instrumental song To Whom It May Concern. With being a Christian band, it highly influences their life style and you can see it in their music. From not being a Christian personally, I can step back and respect it for seeing how Underoath can turn it into a beautiful thing. // 10

Lyrics: Spencer Chamberlin's voice has grown a lot since their 4th CD, They're Only Chasing Safety. He went from his normal high screams to low screams and growls. This can be seen on the bands first single Writing On The Walls. There are times where it seems like Spencer's voice is getting strained and that kind of annoys me. He got vocal training so I am not sure why that is happening though. Aaron Gilipsie still has a great singing voice and it is perfect to back up Spencer in the chorus and interlude of songs. The lyrics contain much more Christian reference since They're Only Chasing Safety, and that makes me able to respect the band more. If they are going to call themselves a Christian band, they better live up to that and devote that to their music. There are some bands that call themselves Christian but don't go to church. I find that disrespectful and cheap. Underoath will never fall into that category, but it is good to see them talk more about Christ. // 9

Overall Impression: The guitar work on this CD is excellent. Especially on the opening track In Regards To Myself. The CD is excellent, mixed well. It was produced by Killswitch Engage's very own Adam D. He has a great musical talent that made the band come even more alive. Some song you need to check out are In Regards To Myself, You're Ever So Inviting, Casting Such A Thin Shadow, Moving For The Sake Of Motion, Writing On The Walls, and To Whom It May Concern. The CD is overall good, but some of the tracks sound the same after a while. If I lost it or someone stole it, it's on my iPod so I don't really care. // 9

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overall: 10
Define The Great Line Reviewed by: MusicMan101, on november 05, 2007
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Sound: This band's music spreads across many genres. Unblack Metal, Death Metal, Deathcore, Metalcore, Hardcore, Punk, And Sadly Popcore. But this CD is truely Underoath at it's best so far, finally reconciling the heaviness of the early records with the energy of the new ones. Except, this isn't exactly a combination. It's a new style of rock never heard of, that may perhaps spawn a new type of rock called Underoathcore due to it's unique awesomeness. Guitars flow so beautifully. Each song has atleast five distinct head-pounding melodies. One must think to himself, will Underoath one day be copied time and time again? My friends Underoath is already establishing itself as the most influencial post-hardcore/melodic hardcore/metalcore band ever (now understand why they need their own genre). // 10

Lyrics: Lyrics are top-rate, though complicated, the main point of each song is comprehendable. They are like no other, is the only way I can explain. Spencer Chamberline may have established himself as the best screamer in both Hardcore and metalcore genres, improving dramatically from the last CD. He is unsurpassed, and, I dare say it, possibly, maybe, better than Dallas Taylor, now I know the Old fans are going to come after me. He is extremely good at transitions, sometimes I can't tell if he's screaming or not (Your Ever So Inviting). Never enough said, Spencer is the bomb. Aaron Gillespie is amazing, being his voice doesn't even belong to the hardcore/metal genre, yet his presence still doesn't water down the band's power; on top of that he plays drums. He is no longer the supporting vocals, as now this band has two phenominal lead vocalists. Unlike many hardcore bands Underoath doesn't only follow the bland tried-but-true sing-scream-sing-scream, but never does the samething twice. // 10

Overall Impression: Seeing how I focused most of my time glofying Underoath and less time describing it, you'll probably push this review off to the side as a biased stupid report. Don't let my stupidity stop you. Listen to Define The Great Line, they are what they are said to be. I've listened to You're Ever So Inviting about fifty times in a row, I better move on to Writing on the Walls. Check out their amazing music videos for the CD, you'll be suprised. Their next CD is going to be even heavier. In a confused music world where ever band is trying to figure out what to compromise on, Underoath compromises nothing, delievering every aspect of their songs awesomally. // 10

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overall: 8.3
Define The Great Line Reviewed by: underfan15, on december 07, 2007
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Sound: The music and the screaming in this album reflect the earlier days of Underoath, back when Dallas Taylor was the lead vocalist. Very heavy guitar, and deeper vocals than the past few albums. Also, Aaron does a pretty good job with his emo-style singing. Overall, the sound can tell you all you need to know about how serious these guys are, but if you're new to Underoath, or the metal genre altogether, you may need to have the lyrics right there in front of you. At first sound, you may assume it to be "satan music", because of the heaviness. // 8

Lyrics: The lyrics have the ability to be interpreted many ways, although either way you look at it, the entire album talks about suffering, eventually leading up to the final track, "To Whom It May Concern", which pretty much tells you to forget the past, and keep going forward, because eventually, "you'll find what you've been longing for". Another album from the brilliant mind of God, through Spencer Chamberlain. My personal favorite songs would have to be "in Regards To Myself", "There Could Be Nothing After This", "Writing on the Walls", "You're Ever So Inviting", and "Moving For the Sake of Motion." // 9

Overall Impression: The impression one could get from this album is very rough and harsh. But, if they look at the lyrics, or can understand, they will be blessed. The songs are very delicate, but the music at first sound can be harsh. what I really loved about it is the way it's so deep, and it's so truthful to what the Christian life is like. But what I didn't like about it is that you sometimes had to think about what they were saying. If it were stolen or lost, I'd definately get it again. // 8

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overall: 10
Define The Great Line Reviewed by: parkerguitars24, on january 12, 2008
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Sound: This album can be summed up in one word: wow! This is a huge step up from "They're Only Chasing Safety". The maturation of Spencer and Aaron as vocalists greatly impact this album. They've traded in their pop/screamo for almost metalcore. It might be crazy to say, but that's the best way to describe it. This sounds more like Spencer finding his own voice, rather than trying to emulate Dallas Taylor. Fans of TOCS might be just a bit taken back by this album, but die hard UO fans will love it. // 10

Lyrics: Unlike a lot bands, instead of singing about struggles with relationships and fights with friends, underOath sings of struggles with one's self, which I think is on a much higher plane. Their lyrics have a deeper, christian meaning. An example of this is "In Regards to Myself". It's basically Spencer telling listeners to "come clean and get it off their chests", meaning to confess your sins, and seek God's forgiveness. And the best example: "Salamarnir" is Spencer's cousin reading Psalms: 20 in Russian. Being a Christian, I really respected that. // 10

Overall Impression: Overall, I think this is the best album UO has done. They've completely come into their own, almost escaping categorization. Crunchy riffs, like that of "In Regards To Myself" really make this album stand out among other Screamo artists. "Returning Empty Handed" and "Moving for the Sake of Motion" were easily the heaviest tracks, with completely insane drumming on the latter. "Writing On The Walls" is so emotional, it's like Spencer and Aaron put their soul into the song when they sing. This was probably the best track, behind "Returning Empty Handed" and "Moving For The Sake Of Motion". If this were lost or stolen I would more than definitely buy it again, as underOath is my all-time favorite band. Now, go out and buy this album. // 10

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overall: 9.3
Define The Great Line Reviewed by: unregistered, on february 13, 2008
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Sound: I'd heard one song, "Writing On The Walls", on I think it was "17 Christian rock hits" or something, and I started listening to it more and more, I couldn't really understand what they were saying, and the possibility of Christian heavy metal fascinated me. So, I searched for Underoath on video.aol.com, and found more and more songs from these guys, and I had the lyrics right there on the computer, so I was amazed. See, my parents had taught me that songs which you couldn't understand it, they were talking about Satan backwards. Boy, were they wrong! As I listened more and more, I finally found out they had a new CD out, so I went out and got it. I was amazed, and it didn't leave my CD plyer for a while, until I got an MP3 Player lol. So, the sound of course is very heavy, although getting more into Christian metal, I found out Underoath is actually kind of soft these days! I later found out the CD was a lot about the childhood of the screamer, Spencer Chamberlain. // 9

Lyrics: Considering it was a Christian band, I kind of expected them to talk about Christ, and not speak in cryptic metaphors etc. But even if so, the band really outdid themselves. The lyrics are actually very deep, you have to think about what it is that they're saying. If you take it word for word, you'll think they're high or something! Spencer really knows how to scream, although his deep screaming isn't really all that great, honestly. They say he was taking voice lessons, and I believe it, considering I didn't hear any low screams in "they're only chansing safety". But, the lyrics mostly talk about struggle, although "in regards to myself" is actually a song pleading non-Christians to convert, and "to whom it may concern" is about going on, moving on with your life after struggle, because you'll eventually "find what you've been (looking) for". Also, Aaron Gillepsie, the emo-voice singer, is quite good too. Considering he plays the drums, true sings, is colorblind in one eye and blind in the other, he really out-does himself. // 10

Overall Impression: Wow. These guys are awesome, they really know how to make you think, and they give a good song as well! I'd probably compare it to, say, Demon Hunter, and maybe Norma Jean's "Redeemer" CD. My favorite songs on the album are "In Regards To Myself", "There Could Be Nothing After This", "Moving For The Sake Of Motion", and "A Moment Suspended In Time". I love how they're not afraid to say, "yeah, we're a Christian band". I can't really say I hate anything about the CD. I would probably but it again, and this time this deluxe edition, if it were stolen or lost. // 9

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overall: 8.3
Define The Great Line Reviewed by: armand0, on march 10, 2008
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Sound: Underoath is one of those bands that pass and they leave a mark in music, the guys have been playing for almost 7 years and right now they released this new record that surpassed the expectatives that they imagined. The album went Gold with 98,000 copies sold the first week and stayed on 2nd place right behind Nelly Furtado newest CD "Loose". it's a new ride for those of you that try to find new sounds, you should listen to it. // 7

Lyrics: Although many lyrics are verses that talk about having faith, the songwriting leaves me with a good impression, the lyrics are complex and in a certain way you will notice that they are talkin about God. The instruments make a great company for the lyrics, since the guitars and keyboards make a great duo for creating this unique sound that all their 11 songs have. Spencer Chamberlain developed a way of screaming that impressed me, since many metal vocalists out there goes non stop screaming through the whole song, you may find many metal vocalists the same. But Spencer discovered a way to combine screaming with singing, the drummer Aaron Gillespie helps him with the melodic singing behind him and it keeps the originality of this record. // 9

Overall Impression: It has no comparison, it is a new sound that many bands out there can't get. The sound of this record impressed me, I feel that every instrument is playing but at the same time every instrument is kind of "masking" itself. To clarify my point I suggest you should listen to these songs: Writing On The Walls, Salmarnir, A Moment Suspended In Time, To Whom It May Concern, Casting Such A Thin Shadow. What I really give a lot of props in this album is the fact that all the instruments didn't have the need to sound so obvious in the record, since the majority of the time the keyboards and the drums help every other instruments and even both of them sound better. What I don't like about this record is the changing of singing and screaming of Spencer, it is too sudden and every shift leaves his voice kinda rusty. I live in Panama, and the rock scene and the metal scene slowly faded from this country, it is very small this scene over here and I had to buy this record from another country, so if I my copy gets stolen or lost I'll have the necessity to buy another one from the same country, although I uploaded the CD to my computer. // 9

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overall: 9.7
Define The Great Line Reviewed by: punkforlife93, on may 03, 2008
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Sound: This band is outright great, and as of now is one of my favorite bands. I've owned this album for the past three months, and I can't get enough of it. The guitar is incredibly effective and technical, implicating elements of mathcore in Underoath's style. Define the Great Line is heavier than They're Only Chasing Safety by a long shot, and worth a billion good listens. The band is so diverse in their musical styles, from the drum heavy Returning Empty Handed, to the cool riffs demonstrated in the song In Regards to Myself, to even the orgasmic (not a typo) Writing on the Walls. Every time I hear this CD, it impresses me in a new way. Good work, Underoath. // 10

Lyrics: The lyrics to Define the Great Line are clearly concerned with the ending of earth and Jesus coming to save his people, but also diverse subjects dealing with things outside Christianity. The lyrics wouldn't seem to work as well as they do with the music style of this band, but the execution of it is flawless. And then the singing, great as well. Spencer Chamberlain's voice is outright immense, and when I first heard the CD I thought Underoath had two screamers. And then Aaron Gillespie, just as great, in a different way. He sings the clean parts really well, and completes Underoath, along with his drumming. // 9

Overall Impression: 01. In Regards To Myself - this has one of the strongest opening riffs to a CD that I've ever heard, and it's an excellent get-pumped song. The lyrics are great too, and it is a great opening track to the album. 02. A Moment Suspended In Time - this was originally my favorite song on the album because of how Spencer and Aaron's vocals flow together so seamlessly. I still really love it, as well as the lyrics in it. 03. There Could Be Nothing After This - this song for me was good, but overall, it was the most meh song on the album. The opening lyrics are really good, but it just didn't have much of an effect on me though. The outro for this song/intro for the next one is great though. 04. You're Ever So Inviting - this song is one of my favorite songs on the album, and it has such great flow and guitar. The pace of it changes abruptly too. My #4 of the album currently. 05. Salmarnir - for a while, when I got the CD, this was the one song I skipped, because it seemed so boring. But after a while of forgetting to skip it, I got hooked. Not my favorite song, but still good. 06. Returning Empty Handed - the drumming on this song is completely amazing, as well as the killer guitar riffs. I can't get this song down on guitar, it's so fast and great and the singing/screaming is great too. Some of the effects on the guitar make me just go wow. #3 on the album. 07. Casting Such A Thin Shadow - a good song, but you have to let it grow on you. Overall a really cool song, not much to say. Very good flow. 08. Moving For The Sake Of Motion - the drumming on this song is once again completely epic. And there's some riffs that pop out at you, especially the little soloish thing and the breakdown riffs. #5 on the album. 09. Writing On The Walls - this song is amazing. There's nothing else to say. As I said before orgasmic. Seriously. My #1 on the album. 10. Everyone Looks So Good From Here - this song is freaking explosive. It's so intense and action-packed, perfect for headbangage. And the first time I listened to it (I had my big bass headphones on), towards the end there's like a 15 second pause where it's fading out. But then suddenly boom! It just completely explodes in your face, and I actually jumped. Amazing. #2 on the album. 11. To Whom It May Concern - a good song, but not very defining. Nothing to say, it just is beautiful in it's own way. If this ever got stolen, I wouldn't just buy another copy, I'd buy one, and then I'd hunt down and kill the bastard that stole it. But seriously, this is amazing, and one of my all time favorite albums. // 10

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overall: 9.7
Define The Great Line Reviewed by: martyrdood, on july 18, 2008
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Sound: How can you not love this album? With songs like "Writing on the Walls" "In Regards to Myself" and "You're Ever So Inviting" how can you possibly go wrong? I'll listen to these guys over and over and over and over and over and it never gets repetitive. Starting off with "In Regards to Myself", the riff at the start, it's what you'd expect from the likes of Underoath, never lets off for two seconds, sounds very dark and heavy, I like it. From there "A Moment Suspended in Time" blows our ass out the window, and we get another taste of heavy, rhytmic Underoath melodies. I'm just going to cover two other songs in some detail, "You're Ever so Inviting" puts our ass further out the window, while still maintaining what I call medlody and rhythm. They're not loud for the sake of it, they're loud cause they're Underoath, and it's like Spencer and Aaron were designed to sing together. This song only needs one word to describe it, perfect, "Writing on the Walls" is perfect technically, rhymically and vocally, one of their best ever in my opinion. When I play this CD I never play it quietly, I play it loud, until the police come around. The neighbours generally complain about the music I play. They say it isn't possible for a CD to sound so good, so they call the police to make me tell them where I got it from. // 10

Lyrics: If you look upo the lyrics to Underoath's songs, you'll find they actually contain really deep messages, it's gorgeous the way they make their music, they elaborate on how time is short, and include bits of pieces of their religious beliefs. Another theme covered in detail is the luster of an ex-girlfriend, and how you can't shake that feeling. They cover many more topics but I can't cover them all. The only downside is that you sometimes can't make sense of the screaming but still a 10. // 10

Overall Impression: A few of the songs puzzle me, such as "Slmarnir", I'm not to sure what's going on there, but to be completely unbiased I'd have to give it a nine, it isn't the perfect album but it is the album I will never lose, as I'd keep this thing in a safe. Underoath have produced something which is heavy but still lingers in the likes of They're Only Chasing Saftey, and it's what makes that brutal combination even better. // 9

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overall: 10
Define The Great Line Reviewed by: unregistered, on november 08, 2010
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Sound: Simply put, this cd sounds like it was produced by a whole new band. Gone are the somewhat simplistic song arrangements, guitar parts, and chord structures of They're Only Chasing Safety. Gone is the single, shrill pitch of screamer Spencer Chamberlain. In place of all these things is a sound that is vastly more mature that anything Underoath has put out in the past. Right away, the opening track, "In Regards To Myself" lets you know this band now means business. The guitar riffs are much more complex this time around, as the opening song shows. The guitarists play with dissonance in a lot of their riffs, in the opening track, and especially in the amazingly heavy "Returning Empty Handed." The keys are much more of an accent to the music this time around, adding ambiance to everything. Aaron's drumming remains a highlight. He can come up with incredible drum patterns that break the mold of conventional rhythms. As a whole, this record sounds as if every single band member was truly working to create a unified whole. Albeit, a much heavier whole. // 10

Lyrics: The lyrics are very well written. They do not possess and standard ABAB rhyming couplets or the like, but they still flow so well that they sound perfect. Spencer proves himself to be an admirable lyricist, penning words that have nothing to do with surface-level emo whining, and are all about acknowledging and overcoming our internal struggles as human beings. The interplay between Spencer and Aaron is simply beautiful, too. Many times overlapping the guttural screams of Spencer with Aaron's strong and clear singing voice, both singers demonstrate immense skill. Spencer even contributes some clean vocals occasionally. The biggest improvement in the vocal range overall belongs to Spencer. No longer is he limited to a single-pitch shriek. He now fills the record with low, gut-wrenching growls, mid range barks, forceful yells, and high-pitched shrieks. The versatility he displays is astonishing, and most of all, dynamic. // 10

Overall Impression: I have no reservations whatsoever about putting this album in my top 5 of all time. I personally don't think Underoath will ever top this one (and they most certainly didn't with "Lost In the Sound of Separation"). My personal highlights from the album would have to be "In Regards To Myself," "There Could Be Nothing After This," "Returning Empty Handed," and "To Whom It May Concern." I can't find a single thing I hate about the cd; every single track is perfect to my ears. I would buy the album again even if it weren't lost or stolen. Even if Underoath has turned you off in the past, please give this one a try. I guarantee you'll be impressed in some way. // 10

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