Hurley Review

artist: weezer date: 09/21/2010 category: compact discs
weezer: Hurley
Released: Sep 14, 2010
Genre: Rock, Pop Rock
Label: Epitaph Records
Number Of Tracks: 10
Weezer has once again found its stride with a collection of immediately memorable pop rock tunes on Hurley.
 Sound: 7.8
 Lyrics: 7.5
 Overall Impression: 7.8
 Overall rating:
 7.4 
 Reviewer rating:
 7.7 
 Users rating:
 7 
 Votes:
 104 
reviews (4) 79 comments vote for this album:
overall: 10
Hurley Reviewed by: UG Team, on september 14, 2010
6 of 22 people found this review helpful

Sound: For many who reveled in the pop-rock perfection that was the Weezer's debut (The Blue Album), the last few years could give one pause. The quartet's previous release Raditude seemed to be an awkward stage for a band whose members were approaching their 40's. Granted, that record was met with some positive feedback, but tracks like I'm Your Daddy bounced too frequently between lovable quirkiness and forced, uninspired coolness. It seems that in 2010 that vocalist/guitarist Rivers Cuomo and the gang have finally come full circle. The nerdy innocence and infectious pop melodies have returned with a beautiful vengeance on the latest record Hurley, making Weezer a completely viable band for more than a few generations. In many ways Hurley (an album that lovingly features the visage of LOST actor Jorge Garcia) strips everything down. You get a garage rock type of vibe happening throughout most of the record, with only added instrumentation during appropriate moments. While a past song like Beverly Hills certainly felt as modern as you can get, the 10 tracks on Hurley concentrate on little more than the power of the standard band setup. Memories, Smart Girls, and Ruling Me are straightforward pop songs, but insanely likable particularly Memories, which could be deemed Buddy Holly 2.0 That's not to say that Hurley is devoid of musical creativity. The band utilizes a churchlike setup in the intro for Trainwrecks, which transitions from a solemn choral background into your basic rock tune fairly quickly. Where's My Sex, an instantly memorable track for the title alone, actually changes up the primary melody in one of the center sections. It's enough to make you sit up and listen a little more intently. The most satisfying and unexpected offering arrives with Unspoken an acoustic ballad that builds and builds into a crescendo and actually features Cuomo sounding like about three or four different guys in one. // 10

Lyrics: Thankfully the I'm Your Daddy days are gone and Weezer has returned to a more innocent, geek-fueled approach to their lyrical content. Whether it's a sweet love song in Ruling Me, an ode to cerebral-driven females of the world in Smart Girls, or the inspirational Brave New World, Weezer doesn't waste opportunities to be insightful or clever. The standout has to be Where's My Sex, of course, which reflects on a universal conundrum for the ages. // 10

Overall Impression: If you've felt that Weezer has been in a bit of a slump post-Pinkerton, you're in for a pleasant surprise with Hurley. There's a purity to the recording process that allows for the bare basics (i.e., guitar, bass, drums, and vocals) to come through without feeling like this is a band that could afford the best producer and audio tricks in the world. Sure, you have guests like Michael Cera show up to sing backup vocals and play the hurdy gurdy on Hang On, but the spotlight is still on the usual quartet. Some may argue whether it lives up to the impression originally made by Weezer (The Blue Album), but this is one reviewer who believes that Hurley lives up to that hype and more. // 10

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overall: 5.3
Hurley Reviewed by: Paul*Stanley, on september 15, 2010
1 of 3 people found this review helpful

Sound: Hurley has a pop sound that should be familiar to Weezer fans, but is more syth-heavy than their past albums. If listened to from beginning to end, the songs all kind of just blend together, and not in a good way. Except for the lead single, "Memories," it's all pretty forgettable, especially compared to some of Weezer's older work. It almost sounds like their label said, "Put out an album before September 15th. GO!" It isn't a terrible album, but it feels like the maturity and comfort that Weezer demonstrated so well with The Red Album is completely gone and now they're pandering to the radio listeners. // 5

Lyrics: Weezer's most recent self-titled album (the Red Album) was said to be Rivers Cuomo coming to terms with reaching middle age and having a child. Raditude, their other most recent release, was said to be his reflection on his younger days. Both of them felt like natural evolutions for the band. Hurley feels somewhat out in left field, however. There really isn't a lot of the catchy melodies that Weezer is known for here. // 6

Overall Impression: Hurley might not absolutely ruin your opinion of Weezer, especially if you enjoyed the way they experimented with synthesizers on Raditude, but feels bland and forgettable. Cuomo might be losing his touch with his amazing songwriting skills, because there's just not a lot here to satisfy Weezer fans. Expect to hear a lot of Hurley on the radio, but don't expect to be wowed by it. Download "Memories," but the rest of the album isn't worth it. // 5

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overall: 7.7
Hurley Reviewed by: unregistered, on september 16, 2010
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: There's been an elephant in the room for geek overlords Weezer for some time - will there be another album as emotionally honest as 1996's high point "Pinkerton"? And with 2009's "Raditude" receiving a mauling from both fans and critics alike, Rivers Cuomo promised Hurley to be a "raw, unpolished rock record." And, partly, he's right. The two openers, "Memories" and "Ruling Me", are both musically pitched between the heavy thump of 2002's "Maladroit" and the pop of "Raditude", and are, alas, far too polished to make it old school Weezer. Thankfully, though, as soon as "Trainwrecks" roars into view, the album becomes their most consistent since "Maladroit". Angry guitars, screechy vocals and thumping choruses are firmly back on the menu. The finest track, "Unspoken", begins as a tender acoustic lament similar to "Butterfly", before revving into an agitated rocker reminiscent of "Say It Ain't So". Weezer are connecting to their past, and in such a convincing way, and the hardcore riffs of "Run Away" and "Hang On" offer plenty to provide a smile to any exasperated Weezer fan. The pounding "Where's My Sex" is also a highlight which is close to a contemporary version of the "Blue Album". // 8

Lyrics: Lyrically, Cuomo finally offers a slightly more personal approach to "Hurley", a trick he hasn't applied since "Perfect Situation". "Run Away" is one of the tracks close to the soul-searching of "Pinkerton", as does the Ryan Adams co-write "Unspoken". Lines such as "and if you take this away from me / I'll never forgive you" and "over and over / We swore it was over" sound considerably more characteristic of Cuomo as opposed to "I can't stop partying". Alas, Cuomo does indulge in his trademark woeful vignettes from time to time, though these are usually kept for "Smart Girls". "Where's My Sex" provides comic relief a la "The Sweater Song", in which Cuomo simply changes the word 'socks' for 'sex', creating a frustrated diatribe of sexual frustration, which cleverly changes tack halfway through into a snotty punk anthem. // 7

Overall Impression: "Hurley" is indeed a full on rock record from start to finish, and though not as raw as Cuomo would have you believe, it's still a huge relief to hear them turn up the amps and channel the rocky spirit of "The Green Album" and "Maladroit", the two albums this LP best resemble. "Unspoken" and "Run Away" are both the highlights here, both sounding like Weezer offcuts from the '90s, which, as we know, is certainly no bad thing. Though not as good as their first 3 albums, it's certainly their best work in nearly a decade, and let's just hope the next album plays down the polish even further. No Lil Wayne, either. // 8

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overall: 7.7
Hurley Reviewed by: unregistered, on september 21, 2010
0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Sound: There's been an elephant in the room for geek overlords Weezer for some time - will there be another album as emotionally honest as 1996's high point "Pinkerton"? And with 2009's "Raditude" recieving a mauling from both fans and critics alike, Rivers Cuomo promised Hurley to be a "raw, unpolished rock record." And, partly, he's right. The two openers, "Memories" and "Ruling Me", are both musically pitched between the heavy thump of 2002's "Maladroit" and the pop of "Raditude", and are, alas, far too polished to make it old school Weezer. Thankfully, though, as soon as "Trainwrecks" roars into view, the album becomes their most consistent since "Maladroit". Angry guitars, screechy vocals and thumping choruses are firmly back on the menu. The finest track, "Unspoken", begins as a tender acoustic lament similar to "Butterfly", before revving into an agitated rocker reminiscent of "Say It Ain't So". Weezer are connecting to their past, and in such a convincing way, and the hardcore riffs of "Run Away" and "Hang On" offer plenty to provide a smile to any exasperated Weezer fan. The pounding "Where's My Sex" is also a highlight which is close to a contemporary version of the "Blue Album". // 8

Lyrics: Lyrically, Cuomo finally offers a slightly more personal approach to 'Hurley', a trick he hasn't applied since "Perfect Situation". "Run Away" is one of the tracks close to the soul-searching of "Pinkerton", as does the Ryan Adams co-write "Unspoken". Lines such as "and if you take this away from me / I'll never forgive you" and "over and over / We swore it was over" sound considerably more characteristic of Cuomo as opposed to "I can't stop partying". Alas, Cuomo does indulge in his trademark woeful vignettes from time to time, though these are usually kept for "Smart Girls". "Where's My Sex" provides comic relief a la "The Sweater Song", in which Cuomo simply changes the word 'socks' for 'sex', creating a frustrated diatribe of sexual frustration, which cleverly changes tack halfway through into a snotty punk anthem. // 7

Overall Impression: "Hurley" is indeed a full on rock record from start to finish, and though not as raw as Cuomo would have you believe, it's still a huge relief to hear them turn up the amps and channel the rocky spirit of "The Green Album" and "Maladroit", the two albums this LP best resemble. "Unspoken" and "Run Away" are both the highlights here, both sounding like Weezer offcuts from the '90s, which, as we know, is certainly no bad thing. Though not as good as their first 3 albums, it's certainly their best work in nearly a decade, and let's just hope the next album plays down the polish even further. No Lil Wayne, either. (c) sam lambeth 2010. // 8

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More Weezer reviews rating latest review
+ Pinkerton 9.5 11/25/2009
+ Weezer (Blue Album) 9.7 11/20/2009
+ Raditude 7.2 11/13/2009
+ Maladroit 7.9 07/24/2009
+ Christmas With Weezer 7.8 12/22/2008
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