Disbelief. Part Ten

An unexpected face does not bode well for Paul as Disbelief perform at Fuse.

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Ultimate Guitar
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Midnight was only minutes away now. That was when their first chord was due. Together, the members of Disbelief were assembled on a small and cluttered stage beneath the crimson glow of the floodlights. The DJ had ended his night already, handing over to the opening act a crowd that was neither patient nor quiet. The lighting covering everybody on the cramped dancefloor, coupled with their demanding shouts and gestures, made them all seem like the bloodthirsty cast of a zombie film. Paul relished the sight of it. The reckless demand for more entertainment seemed violent and carnal. These people couldn't care less who was playing, they just wanted to make sure that the money they had spent at the door and at the bar had not been wasted. These were Fuse patrons, and they were honest people. They wanted what they wanted, and they were damned sure going to get it.

Everything set up and arranged, Paul had taken to taunting them. He was stood, his bass in playing position, at the very front of the stage, behind the microphone. He was also completely ignoring his audience, choosing instead to stand perfectly still and stare at his watch. His laptop was already counting down the seconds. He knew this, but with each passing moment he could feel an increase in the fury of their spectators. The intensity was nearly overwhelming. Paul loved it, so much so that he was hard pressed to keep the smile from his face. That, unfortunately, would give the game away.

He could imagine the expressions of his friends without having to look at them. Adam would likely still have fear etched in every line of his face. His confidence had been shaky all day, leading to numerous speeches explaining nothing but terror. These people horrified him to his very soul, but Paul had convinced him to stay and play. Adam's nails had been chewed right down to the quick. His hands would be shaking and his eyes would be darting back and forth across the faces of the crowd.

Jace would be watching Paul; alert and ready in case of danger. Whether Paul liked it or not, Jace had always been there to act as his guardian. The mass of enraged bodies did not bother him at all. His concern was Paul's welfare. Likely this was quite justified considering Paul's constant mockery of their audience. Nevertheless, Paul felt quite at ease.

Ed, as usual, seemed quite unfazed by this mob. He had marched through them to reach the stage. Even now Paul suspected that Ed would be wearing his typical benevolent smile, looking out like a king would look over his subjects. His hands in place, his fingers ready, Ed would only need a moment's notice to launch into Disbelief's chosen opener.

A new addition to their usual presence, just for today, was the purple-haired and short-skirted Ally. Placing her behind them, out of the reach of their aggressive audience, had been absolutely essential. Her own attempted 'rock chick' style was nothing compared to that of the everyday Fuse patron. This place inspired fear amongst the ignorant masses of society. Ally had been seated behind the laptop by Paul so that, hopefully, she would at least look busy.

She jumped in her seat when midnight finally came and the laptop let out a brief, loud and clear alarm. Paul wasted no time. He leaned in close to the microphone and inhaled sharply. In perfect unison, Disbelief came alive. The sudden blast of volume that came from the first touch of their instruments drowned out each and every sound from their crowd.

It all slipped so smoothly into place. The notes melded together as perfectly as the members of Disbelief itself. The power of Paul's vocal lines were complemented by the subtle notes sung by Adam. The tension was high, as was the energy. It all flowed through Paul, driving his hands and pushing his voice to a vicious outcry that Adam did not even try to match. Euphoria had set in, and Paul was helpless against it.

Ed ripped through the solo after the first chorus with a practised precision. As always, their lead guitarist made every note look practically effortless. His movements were fast, but so very smooth. It was as though the guitar was merely an extension of him, answering always Ed's very will and thought.

As they entered the second chorus, their spectators began to sing along. It came across more as a mass of noise, but the pleasure of Disbelief's drunken audience was marvellously evident. Paul raised the volume of his voice in answer, calling out so that everybody listening could hear every note.

The song came to a close with Paul's vocal cords aching. Nevertheless, there was no respite. As planned, after only four seconds of pause, Jace began to strike a familiar beat. As the crowd roared their approval, Paul took the microphone stand in hand.

"We're Disbelief," he announced, "that was Avenged Sevenfold," he continued, "and this is Iron Maiden," he completed at the same time as his two guitarists began to bend their strings in unison.

It quickly became clear that they could not have chosen a better song. Every single person looking up at them knew this song inside and out. The numerous voices that rose to accompany Paul were perfectly in time.

The DJ, having stayed to watch the show, began to lead the many voices further towards making a melody. He stood atop his booth, just to the left of the stage, holding out a microphone and shouting along to the music. When the vocals paused and the melody changed, the DJ took to clapping his hands with the rhythm. Under his example, the entirety of the dancefloor followed suit. Watching the DJ, Paul nodded his approval, and, when seeing it returned, an uncontrollable smile overtook his face.

Though not a particularly heavy song, the way Disbelief played it, coupled with the active participation of the Fuse patrons, gave it an energy all of its own. Paul relaxed his vocals, letting the roar of voices from all around the room pick up the slack. In the brief pauses between lyrics, he glanced first at Adam, then at Ed. As usual, his two guitarists were so completely different. He had never known two musicians with such polar opposite styles. Despite this, they worked so well together. Paul found it amusing.

It was as the excitement of the song peaked that Paul recognised a face in the crowd that he was not expecting to see. There, leant on the bar, raising his drink in response to Paul's look of surprise, stood Matthew Cooper. However, a movement of the crowd obscured him from view.

Fear washed over him for a moment, but he quickly achieved control over it. Quite suddenly, Paul felt dreadfully exposed and vulnerable. The image of a murderer caught in a line-up played in his mind, grappling for purchase. He rejected it fiercely as overdramatic, but it left behind a nagging feeling of self-doubt. Determined not to let it faze him, Paul entered the last chorus with all the strength his voice could muster.

Their spectators responded with an equal outpouring, dragging Paul straight back into the energetic excitement he had helped to create. The song ended in much the same way as it had begun, with the speakers behind Disbelief warring for dominance against the voices of the furious and ecstatic audience.

Still sticking to the plan, the members of Disbelief allowed themselves a few moments with which to ease their aching limbs. Covering for his friends, Paul returned to the microphone:

"I'm glad to hear you like Maiden too," he said calmly, he then paused to allow room for the cheer that followed.

"Thank you, thank you," he eventually continued. "Unfortunately, we're just the opening act, so we only get to share one more song with you. We thought long about what song, but we'll get to that in a minute. At this point comes the shameless self-advertising which, fortunately, we do a little differently."

Confident that he had their attention, Paul waved Ally to the front of the stage. She came quite happily and stood beside him to curtsey sarcastically to the audience. After that, she simply stood there, politely awaiting Paul.

"This is Ally," he stated simply. "She's a friend of ours. She's going to help us with a little demonstration, just to cement our band name in your heads. Go ahead Ally."

Looking shrewdly across the crowd, she casually placed her hands on the hem of her t-shirt and began to lift it. The small action was nonetheless watched very closely. Those that waited with baited breath however, were disappointed. She stripped off her t-shirt to reveal a tight-fitting tank top, worn to amplify her cleavage rather than show off her breasts. She let her hair fall as it would, then pushed it back, out of her face and away from her chest. Still, judging by the cheers and whistles, some people were quite satisfied by this.

"You are currently experiencing a feeling of Disbelief," Paul continued. "If you will now focus on Ally's chest, you will see the name of our band, just to remind you."

Looking down at her own tank top, Ally pulled it taut from the bottom. This served two purposes. First, it made the fabric straight, bringing the word emblazoned there into clarity. Second, it made her chest bulge against the material. Either way, it worked marvellously. In truth, Paul did not think he would need to draw any more attention to Ally's chest, but he did so just in case.

"And now," Paul added, "if we could draw your attention to Ally's arse."

Briefly, the crowd was silent. Then, Ally turned around, bent over slightly, and pulled up her skirt. The sight of her black underwear, with 'Disbelief' in white letters across her backside, caused quite an uproar.

"So does anybody know what we're called?" Paul queried.

The answer seemingly came from everybody in the room. Quite content, Ally dropped her skirt to cover herself again, then turned to give another curtsey. Her cheeks were bright red now, but her smile was wide.

"Everybody say thank you to Ally," Paul requested of his audience, who complied happily. Still blushing furiously, Ally rushed back to her seat, sharing a wink with Paul as she did so.

The advertisement over, Ed began to play again. This lead Paul's attention away from Ally's beautiful red cheeks and back to the audience.

"We hope you've been enjoying the show," he said, "but it's not over yet. This is Metallica."

54 comments sorted by best / new / date

    Steven E
    I Like this but (i dont know if anyone has mentioned this) there is a german death metal band called disbelief
    Kroaton
    Great writing , loved every bit of it , is Disbelief still alive or did it break up?
    Diablo1986
    I like the fact that no song titles were used because I guarantee every one of us thought of a different songs based on our tastes... Kinda makes the story yours.
    sergiume
    "It was as though the guitar was merely an extension of him" absolutely brilliant
    Tonganation
    Good edition, funny and entertaining. Song titles would have been nice, though it does make you use your imagination more. I would guess the Metallica song is Master of Puppets, but I guess I'll find out next time.
    Colohue
    Rockstar729 wrote: Okay, I may have missed this, but who's Matthew Cooper???
    Check out part 6, 7 and 8.
    6_Feet_Below
    blink_fan wrote: I liked this one, but why no original songs by disbelief?
    ya i expected the last song to be an original its definetely good though, if a little short. btw, is the A7X song Beast And The Harlot?
    Colohue
    Correct. The first song was 'Beast and the Harlot', the second was 'Run To The Hills'. Good work people. Paul decided against playing originals to a crowd who don't know them. They have a simple point to prove before they go any further, and it's that they're worth hiring.
    BigPaws
    There were no originals because their originals would have cleared the place out. Once a cover band always a cover band.
    BigPaws
    I was referring to the German band of this name. They would seriously clear the crowd with any covers of Maiden.
    Quantonyne
    it was a really dynamic read, i felt the words and could feel the crowd...this one is better then the rest...Colohue you are getting better are these.
    blood_and_gold
    sthall wrote: I do not have any problem with the editing, I was merely making note of a few things to help the author. Having written quite a few pieces myself, I know how difficult it can be to catch all of the mistakes. However, I also know that to be cognizant of one's errors makes them less likely to be repeated in the future. If I mentioned something in my earlier post (at the request of the author, mind you), that had already been brought to his or her attention, then I apologize for that. In no way did I intend to offend the author or you with my comments. Incidentally, none of what I mentioned were related to colloquial grammar. In an effort from stepping on yours or anyone else's proverbial toes, I will refrain from making any further comments.
    You didn't offend anyone sweetie. The back up is appreciated. I won't go into the colloquial grammar because, well, the difference between colloquialisms is vast across regions, so I imagine it will be very different between countries, even if we do speak the same language. Now, I haven't yet taken the time to praise my writer's efforts this week. Fabulous, don't you all agree? The descriptive language especially.
    pandora_grunt
    Awesome. Your even leading up to the official story rather then just background info. Can't wait!
    Jay2007
    Brilliant. It was short, but it was told in a really powerful way Looking forward to the next part colohue - 10/10
    Jango22
    10/10 man. Awesome job, LOVE the creative advertising XD But no song titles? And it was a tad short. I know everyone says 'it's too short' one week, and when you make it longer they say 'it's too long' but this was still a bit short, though it was a good place to end for this week.
    sthall
    Overall I've been enjoying the story. I hate to be the guy that says it, but you've got to spend some more time editing before submitting. 8/10
    Colohue
    sthall wrote: Overall I've been enjoying the story. I hate to be the guy that says it, but you've got to spend some more time editing before submitting. 8/10
    If you can explain why, without using the fact that I'm English against me in some way, then I shall begin to do so.
    Colohue
    CapnKickass wrote: they played run to the hills, didn't they?
    Indeed they did yes
    sthall
    colohue wrote: If you can explain why, without using the fact that I'm English against me in some way, then I shall begin to do so.
    Being English doesnt bother me. What I am referring to are simple mistakes such as typos, tense disagreement, etc Examples: P10: He was stood, his bass in playing position.. carried in a wave of students to Roadkill, a bar not fat from the campus the table they were sat around.. (this one isnt technically incorrect, but is very awkward) as he attempted to navigate this labyrinth, and find Matthew Cooper's office. Paul closed the door behind him, drawing Cooper's attention. Surprisingly, Cooper's face broke into a wide smile at the sight of Paul. He closed his book without looking at it again, and places it upon a pile of letters on the desk. Please dont take my comments the wrong way. Your story is good and well written; I am enjoying reading it and watching the plot unfold. I am simply offering a tad of constructional criticism. If you arent clear on what I am pointing out with the examples, feel free to PM me.
    23dannybhoy23
    Colohue's just annoyed because someone who was probably a yank told him to check his spelling in the last one.
    Maiden-Canada
    Agreed ^ Still, other than minor typos this story is getting better every time; keep it up, dude!
    Colohue
    23dannybhoy23 wrote: Colohue's just annoyed because someone who was probably a yank told him to check his spelling in the last one.
    Check my TyG articles actually, especially the first one. Numerous people complaining that I spell practise wrong, when my editor and I have been quite thorough in checking it. Sthall, you did as I requested. I shall do my best for you.
    blood_and_gold
    sthall wrote: colohue wrote: If you can explain why, without using the fact that I'm English against me in some way, then I shall begin to do so. Being English doesnt bother me. What I am referring to are simple mistakes such as typos, tense disagreement, etc Examples: P10: He was stood, his bass in playing position.. carried in a wave of students to Roadkill, a bar not fat from the campus the table they were sat around.. (this one isnt technically incorrect, but is very awkward) as he attempted to navigate this labyrinth, and find Matthew Cooper's office. Paul closed the door behind him, drawing Cooper's attention. Surprisingly, Cooper's face broke into a wide smile at the sight of Paul. He closed his book without looking at it again, and places it upon a pile of letters on the desk. Please dont take my comments the wrong way. Your story is good and well written; I am enjoying reading it and watching the plot unfold. I am simply offering a tad of constructional criticism. If you arent clear on what I am pointing out with the examples, feel free to PM me.
    If you have any problems with the editing, please take it up with me in private, as that is my job. AndI appreciate you pointin this out but it has been noted. We realised this after it had been put up. The problem with having a once weekly deadline is I only get chance to do one edit, and as you can see mistakes can slip past easily, especially when word processing is involved. I am only human... Incidentally, I allow a bit of leeway when it comes to colloquial grammar. It maintains the realism of the piece. If you would like to debate me on this, I will encourage it heartily. :p Thank you.
    sthall
    colohue wrote: Sthall, you did as I requested. I shall do my best for you.
    Thanks for understanding my comments and not taking them the wrong way.