Practicing Guitar: Self Discipline Or Fun?

Most guitarists have lots of fun practicing, but are not highly disciplined, or try to be very disciplined, but find it boring or unfulfilling when they do so.

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Do you find it difficult to fully enjoy the process of highly disciplined practicing? Most guitarists either have lots of fun practicing, but are not highly disciplined, or try to be very disciplined, but find it boring or unfulfilling when they do so. So most people make a (conscious or unconscious) choice to sacrifice "fun" for discipline, or discipline for fun. Making sacrifices with your guitar practice is not only unnecessary, but can be counterproductive to becoming the guitar player you want to be.

Let me show you why

There was a time many years ago when I was not enjoying practicing. My learning sessions were not fun and I began to think of them as an unpleasant chore. I tried to make practicing more enjoyable, but my efforts slowed down my progress more than they helped. I responded to this by becoming more self disciplined and practicing very hard every day hoping that bigger progress would come. Unfortunately that didn't make me much better at playing, and only made the learning process feel even less fun. I talked about this to the teacher who I was studying with at that time, and he made me realize that practicing shouldn't be seen only from one perspective, such as all fun or all discipline. The key to success is the right balance of both elements in practicing. Once I understood this, he and I could start working on creating the appropriate practice schedule and improving my mental approach to practicing to finally get me on the right track to becoming the musician that I am today. In other words, I learned that there is a way to do serious practicing that produces real results while enjoying that process at the same time. This success comes partly from the practice routine itself and partly from your mindset and attitude during the process.

You will get more from the rest of this article, if you have a better understanding of how effective you are now at making serious practicing "fun" without reducing the results. To test yourself, take this short survey. Let's now take a closer look at each of the two components that you must balance in order to enjoy the process of practicing and see consistent progress. I will also share with you the common mistakes people make that lead to an imbalance of these two elements.

Serious/Purpose Driven Practicing (Self Discipline)

Many people assume that sheer self discipline and persistence will make them as good as they want to be. Unfortunately, most guitarists do not understand how to discover and sustain "the right kind" of discipline.

In order to sustain your motivation for a long time, your work must be "fulfilling". If you don't know the reason why doing something is in your very best interest, you will not be fulfilled, and will be unlikely to continue for long. On the other hand, if you do feel the reasons very strongly, you will be able to pull out the needed intensity and discipline from within yourself without trying very hard. Start looking at practicing as something you do in order to achieve a benefit (become a better player). This will automatically create a meaningful reason (beyond simply having fun) to be involved in the activity and not treat it as a chore that you dread doing every day. This may seem obvious and insignificant, but even a small change in thinking will bring about big changes in results!

Some people stereotype this kind of practice as boring or "requiring too much work". However, it is not the practice approach that is "boring", it is often your mental state during practice that makes the process seem tedious. Of course, sometimes the opposite problem can occur and your practice approach may cause you to mindlessly go through the motions of practice. It is very difficult to get yourself to enjoy such activity. In this case, your learning strategy would need to become more effective. For more information about this, read this article.

One of the biggest mistakes regarding focused practicing that I see regularly is excluding variety and fun from the learning process. This happens frequently, especially when you are not under the guidance of a teacher who fundamentally understands this issue. You may think you are doing all the things necessary for fast progress, but your practice approach could still be susceptible to improvement. One such change may be including more variety into your practice. This will help avoid mental burn out and frustration.

Incorporating variety into your practice does not mean a lack of focus, or doing things that are inconsistent with your goals. It simply means that you have multiple approaches for learning, applying and integrating musical skills. I call this "intelligent" variety. This is much different from "random" variety that involves mindless jumping from one item to another in your practice, with no sense of direction.

Another issue that makes it difficult to see discipline as "fulfilling" is that results usually do not occur immediately and the small gains made along the way might seem insignificant. This delayed gratification will make it hard for you to practice well on a consistent basis unless you learn to enjoy the process (more about this later).

Improper application of the idea of variety can also lead you to working on weaknesses that don't really matter. For example, let's assume that your goal is to become a highly advanced metal player. Since this style doesn't require you to fuse elements of other musical genres, it wouldn't be worth your time to work on finger picking or Segovia fingerings for scales (for example). This is because these skills are not necessary for you to reach your goal. So don't waste time on them! It will take you so much longer to reach your goal if you keep getting distracted by working on unnecessary playing elements.

Enjoying The Process (Having Fun While Practicing)

Many guitarists think (on some level) that one cannot have fun learning guitar and get results at the same time. This thinking arises from an idea that "having fun" means random, disorganized practicing with no clear direction and no goals. While it is true that such an approach will not produce significant results, it is still very possible to have fun while working on your playing. Having fun means being able to enjoy the process of practicing. There are many things that go into this, and here is a short list:

  • Experiencing consistent, measurable results throughout the learning process
  • Having confidence that you will reach all of your goals with time
  • Avoiding boredom by knowing when to make adjustments in your practice schedule
  • Fueling your desire to reach your goals by surrounding yourself by what inspires you
  • Practicing application and integration of new skills (together with the old skills). The ways in which we practice mastery, application and integration are totally different and naturally provide a source of "intelligent variety" into your practice routine.

    If I told you that you would get to experience all of the above (and much more) by creating an intelligent, relevant and flexible practicing program, wouldn't you suddenly feel motivated to practice longer and harder in order to see these results? If you answered yes, then you must understand everything I wrote above about how discipline naturally develops from fulfillment!

    Summary: 7 Steps To Effective Balancing Of Discipline And Fun

    01. Make your practice fulfilling! Without the feeling of accomplishment, your motivation and desire will fade. If are having trouble achieving fulfillment, try the following:

  • Soak yourself in inspiration - think back to what made you want to play guitar. Relive the excitement you felt when you got your first instrument. Finally, look ahead to the day when you will have the skills you desire! Focus your mind on the satisfaction of reaching your goals instead of obstacles!

  • Become self-reliant - even if you are working with the very best teacher, you are still practicing on your own most of the time. You must make sure that whatever instructions your teacher gives you (or that you assign yourself) get carried out correctly and consistently!

  • Never give up! Remember You can learn to play guitar as well as you want to, if you have all of your fingers, a strong desire to improve and follow an effective approach to practicing! Never give up!

    02. Have specific goals. You have to be absolutely clear about what level of playing you want to achieve and what you plan to do with these skills once you have them! This is not only critical for guitar playing, but also for everything in life. You need to identify where you want to arrive before you can get there. This means keeping the goal in the Forefront of your mind in order to enable yourself to harness the power of your intentions and desire. Set goals for your practicing, find out how to reach them, and take consistent action to get yourself there.

    03. Incorporate intelligent variety into your practicing. Doing this will help you prevent boredom and burn out. At the same time, by "structuring" your variety in an intelligent way, you will be able to make consistent and measurable progress. Both things can be achieved if your practice schedule is efficient and effective (and proper mindset is applied).

    04. Find an effective way to measure your progress. This is useful for many reasons. First, it is fun to compare your current skill level to your playing from several weeks, months or years ago, and second, it will help to keep you on track toward reaching your goals. Few people do this consistently; most wander aimlessly with no clear sense of direction. This leads to inability to make significant progress.

    05. Keep your mind focused on the item you are practicing until you go on to the next thing on your practice schedule. Don't switch between different things at random. If you understand the reason why practicing a specific item is important for your goals, this becomes easy to do.

    06. Design an effective and flexible practice schedule. You need to organize all the things you want to learn in a system that is effective enough to bring results and also one that can be adjusted to introduce variety. If you cannot do this well on your own, there is help for you here.

    07. Find ways to apply your musical tools.

    The easiest way to have fun while practicing is through application of skills to real music. This sounds obvious, but far too many students think that practicing should be all about "learning new things". Because of this, they don't schedule time for application, integration and mastery of what they already know. As a result, many end up with lots of isolated things "they can do", but no ability to actually use their skills. Learning more things is important but it shouldn't be your top priority all of the time. It is also not much fun to practice things that you can not really integrate with your other musical skills in a real musical context. Great players aren't great because they "know more", it's usually because they can integrate and apply more than the common player.

    Above all else, remember to keep at it! Use the advice from this article to make your practicing both fun and focused in order to decrease the time needed to reach your goals! If you haven't yet taken the survey mentioned at the beginning of the article, you can do so here.

    About the author: Tom Hess is a professional touring guitarist and recording artist. He teaches, trains and mentors musicians from around the world. Visit tomhess.net to discover highly effective music learning resources, lessons and tools including free online assessments, surveys, mini courses and more.

  • 158 comments sorted by best / new / date

      RenegadeDave
      he has some good points and manages to highlight stuff I don't think I'd otherwise think about. You can't yell at him for wanting to cash in on the internet, what if he linked to sites that weren't his where they just barraged you with ads rather than a subscription service?
      ReiDSaN
      I do get slightly sick of him linking to his own website all the time. I appreciate what he's trying to do in terms of improving my playing, yeah, but do you think I'm going to subscribe to another website just so I can be told how good or bad Tom Hess thinks I am at practicing?
      robam
      Well here we go again, I'm not even gonna bother reading this one, because I can already predict the outcome of the article... Take my survey Take my lessons Take my Mark of the Beast That's like at least three articles that His self-righteous ass has released since November 26, 2007. The dreaded day when Tom Hess went away, never to return to UG, because he was probably tired of getting trolled on by people who actually have a half a brain and the ability to use it. Unfortunately a lot of people here seem to have a full brain, but the inability to use it. I mean the last part of this "post" of his says, you can get a free assessment. Is this guy a ****ing used car salesman or something! JESUS CHRIST. "How much do you suck and how much are you going to have to pay? Look I made a chart that you might be able to understand, if not I have a survey followed by an assessment test we can do, do not worry!" The facts remain: Tom Hess inactive for 9 months Tom Hess posts articles frequently Tom Hess writes to get customers not students Tom Hess has a yahctjet, that he is upgrading for trans-galactical space flight. And before all of you cats from before start clawing into me with your great claims of fame and the respect of all the people around you, know this. Every time you support the ever-knowing Tom Hess, God kills a kitten. Although I will give this, someone, and I say someone because god knows Tom didn't post this, actually remembered to crop out the copyright date on this one so we don't know if it's new bullshit or that stale old 06 shit he was selling last time. **** you Tom Hess
      Valekt
      Okay, I take that back - Youth Against Fascism isn't the simplest guitaring I can think of - anything by Neutral Milk Hotel. Sonic Youth's all about the feedback. Apologies for the double post.
      shreddyboy
      valekt, you couldn't tell that the Youtube video looked like a casul jam session, not organized gig or people playing songs? have you ever been to a jam session with good musicians? and why do people always say that people who play their instruments well are emotionless shredders? this is a common bullcrap statement. imo these type of comments are usually from people who cant play well themselves and need to trash other players who obviously worked hard to get to where they are at. those players invested their time and money into becoming great musicians and no one should be knocking them because they play their instrumenst well. i heard blues, jazz and shred all in their, played well and those guitarists all seemed to have their own unique voices (regardless of comments made to the contrary). this past section wsa not intended as apersonal attack on anyone, just thinking out loud here. i think ug is a great site and there is a lot ot learn here, but it seems that many people prefer to attack something they don't agree and make personal attacks on others with rather than discuss it rationally and maturely.
      Flamin' Mania
      shreddyboy wrote: and why do people always say that people who play their instruments well are emotionless shredders? this is a common bullcrap statement. imo these type of comments are usually from people who cant play well themselves and need to trash other players who obviously worked hard to get to where they are at.
      Sure you can be great techniquely but that doesnt mean what your playing sounds good or has any emotion. I think that is what they usually mean. There are heaps of people here who love shredders. Its just a matter of finding ones that can do it right. As for everyone else, its like we have a group of people who are very anti tom hess because he sells himself like a cheap hooker and yet there also seem to be a group of people who love tom hess so much they wanna bend over and make themselves his bitch. Seriously though, get over it. The arguement that he needs to make money because hes a musician is crap. He keeps talking about all this fame he has and how accomplished he is, so why cant he show us for free? Other well known guitarists gave out lessons and tips all the time and they didnt make you pay 50 bucks to hear what everyone was already preaching. Surely if hes so great he should be able to live off his music like everyone else. Now if he came to my house and actually sat down with me, showed me what was going on and was an actual teacher, then maybe he'd be worth paying for. I didn't mean any offense when I said that although it is kind of obvious where my feelings on the matter lie. Finally, dont ask me to post stuff proving how im better than him. I'm not saying I am. I'm not saying he's a bad guitarist. I'm not even talking about his abillities here. thats about it
      Lemoninfluence
      Sure you can be great techniquely but that doesnt mean what your playing sounds good or has any emotion. I think that is what they usually mean. There are heaps of people here who love shredders. Its just a matter of finding ones that can do it right.
      emotion in music is only down to the listener. the player can feel an emotion while playing something and a person can feel something when they listen to that playing but there's no guarantee that it's the same emotion, and it isn't inherently IN the playing. so when you say someone has/doesn't have emotion, what you're really saying is that you don't feel any emotion when listening to that piece of music. and those 2 things are different. also... checked.
      duexe
      tommaso.zillio wrote: They all sound the same, yet...
      Disagree... I count at least four to five different styles in that video with different approaches to the fretboard (and thus a different sound). Metal, Blues, Jazz, Funk, and a really nice emotional piece at the end of the video (how anyone can say they didn't get any emotion from that needs to check themselves for a pulse). Nice bass playing btw ;
      tommaso.zillio
      duexe wrote: tommaso.zillio wrote: They all sound the same, yet... Disagree... I count at least four to five different styles in that video with different approaches to the fretboard (and thus a different sound).
      Duexe, I actually agree with you... "they all sound the same" in my comment was to be intended ironically...
      E-dogg66
      So don't waste time on them! It will take you so much longer to reach your goal if you keep getting distracted by working on unnecessary playing elements.I must Disagree I think if you learn other playing styles, it will only help you feel your way around the guitar and boost your Confidence, As well as an understanding of how that Particular style is comprised.
      hamsy_is_tall
      i dont think its possible to get awesomely good at guitar if you dont like it, lets face it, who plays purely for the discipline of playing??? NO ONE. the more you enjoy an activity, the more you will wish to do it, thats why good guitarists all say I LOVE PLAYING, not YEAH ITS A DRAG BUT I DO IT! music is a gift, not an obligation. thats how i see it
      Coach CON
      lol, these comments far outweigh the content of article... hahaha, how infamous can 1 human be on the internet... hahaha, hilarious. =)
      Quinj
      Palpatine MD wrote: duexe wrote: Where is Palpatine MD? He must not be wearing his Hess detector helmet (or one of you frequent posers..er posters forgot login under an alternate). Its just not the same without him. lol I'm here bro. Behind the grassy knoll with Robam, Fusion and all my other aliases "Improper application of the idea of variety can also lead you to working on weaknesses that dont really matter. For example, let's assume that your goal is to become a highly advanced metal player. Since this style doesnt require you to fuse elements of other musical genres, it wouldn't be worth your time to work on finger picking or Segovia fingerings for scales (for example). This is because these skills are not necessary for you to reach your goal. So don't waste time on them! It will take you so much longer to reach your goal if you keep getting distracted by working on unnecessary playing elements" As a huge metal fan I have to say that this part of the article shows stunning ignorance. How can musical styles possibly progress if players adopt this mentallity? Once again only follow Hess' advice if you want to be a boring, unoriginal guitarist who follows like a zombie clone in the wake of the real musicians. You know the ones I'm talking about.
      I agree with this dude, thats not something a REAL guitarist would say. Metal, as a genre itself, is influenced by so many different things its hard to be original sometimes, so learning techniques that are not "suited" for Metal can help break that barrier. Besides, this is yet another sales pitch. Oh, and i watched that youtube clip someone posted, and seriouly dude, wtf? Dont get me wrong good players, but as boring as **** man. Where was the attitude? The passion? i couldnt see a trace of it. But anywoo, my advice? DO NOT listen to this sales pitch. You want help practicing? then look to your idols. For me, that would be John Petrucci, find out how they practice, their regime, and work that into your own practice regime. But at the same time, try to learn at least 1 new song a month, just to keep things intresting and fresh. And backing tracks are always a good idea to help you use stlyish licks in the context of a song. Well anyway, Peace Out!
      rocknrollstar
      Alot of similiar articles. But guitar is at the end of the day, what you personally make from it. If you want to shred, you'll put in the hours to obtain the skill. For me right now im working on getting my Hendrix down. I want to get the blues rock down before i start the more modern stuff. Theres so much music, sometimes i feel ive got catching up to do
      Valekt
      hamsy_is_tall wrote: i dont think its possible to get awesomely good at guitar if you dont like it, lets face it, who plays purely for the discipline of playing??? NO ONE. the more you enjoy an activity, the more you will wish to do it, thats why good guitarists all say I LOVE PLAYING, not YEAH ITS A DRAG BUT I DO IT! music is a gift, not an obligation. thats how i see it
      Have you seen Robert Fripp play? That guy is the most amazing guitarist, but never looks like he's having fun... In fact, he has an album called Discipline... Personally, I prefer early Crimso stuff, but that's neither here nor there. As an aside, I hate emotionless shredding, which is about all I saw in that youtube video of Hess' students. I'd much rather listen to Youth Against Fascism (simplest guitar part I could think of) than people jerking off their guitars, because there's actual heart in it. Though something so intangible is so hard to measure or define. The mysteries of life and music huh?
      duexe
      nick_b wrote: you're close friends with malmsteen and you can't spell his first name? Y-N-G-W-I-E
      duexe wrote: Lol, Fusion, I dont know Vai or Malmsteen personally. But seriously, I can maybe think of 20 players that may exceed Hess' ability. None of which I know personally. None in my circle are that good.
      Attention to detail is a virtue..
      Paul Tauterouff
      I disgaree with you Crocoscar. Without any defined goals it is really difficult to get to where you want to be. That holds tue in music business and life in general. As far as the ongoing argument about studying different styles, my opnion is that it really depends on what your personal goals are. I like rock and metal, but I also have blues and jazz/ fusion influences and want those to come out in my own music too. If you want to learn a bunch of different styles go ahead, but if you have limited time and want to master one style in particular your time would be best spent focusing on that one. If you don't want to master any or only want to play for your own enjoyment that is cool too. We all have our own levels of desire and our own goals.
      Guitarfreak777
      His article is VERY redundant. To much of a read for the same thing over and over. My advice, shorten these articles if ya want people to really get something from them.
      f1sk
      hess whats with the creepy suit
      robam wrote: Take my Mark of the Beast
      that true?
      IvanGroznij
      Hey this is cool! the intelligent variety stuff really got me thinking, i think I am guilty of using too much of the random kind anyway good read
      Cartilage
      chox wrote: For example, let's assume that your goal is to become a highly advanced metal player. Since this style doesnt require you to fuse elements of other musical genres, it wouldn't be worth your time to work on finger picking or Segovia fingerings for scales (for example). This is because these skills are not necessary for you to reach your goal. So don't waste time on them! It will take you so much longer to reach your goal if you keep getting distracted by working on unnecessary playing elements. this is not something that a real guitar player would say -.-
      +1 i meen seriously im sure most if not every guitarist knows that you have to embrace every style of playing to be an accomplished guitarist Kristofer Dahl is the only online instructor that's worth paying attention to IMO
      dandan321
      Tom Hess is awesome, I read this on his website, and as soon as I read the title, I thought of him.
      tommaso.zillio
      Cartilage wrote: i meen seriously im sure most if not every guitarist knows that you have to embrace every style of playing to be an accomplished guitarist
      I don't know, I think both sides of the issue can make a convincing case in theory. In practice, I see that most of the guitarists I like are not polymaths. I doubt that Gilmour, Slash, Clapton, Santana, Blackmore (just to name a few) actually know how to fingerpick properly. To 'embrace every style of music' seems to imply that a classical guitarist should know how to tap like Van Halen (or Jennifer Batten...), or sweep pick like Gambale... I agree with you that a guitarist that knows more styles is more versatile. But I think that the things you choose to study should be oriented in the direction you want to pursue. If you want to be proficient in more than one style, then study more than one style - but that's your choice. If you want just to become a straight-ahead metal player, then fingerpicking may be useless, depending on the sound you want to achieve.
      crocoscar
      I hate Hess' way of thinking, much too amercian for me :p . It's all about having a precise and final goal and making everything that is possible in order to achieve it Not at all about discovering new things or getting more creative ...
      duexe
      Cartilage wrote: chox wrote: For example, let's assume that your goal is to become a highly advanced metal player. Since this style doesnt require you to fuse elements of other musical genres, it wouldn't be worth your time to work on finger picking or Segovia fingerings for scales (for example). This is because these skills are not necessary for you to reach your goal. So don't waste time on them! It will take you so much longer to reach your goal if you keep getting distracted by working on unnecessary playing elements. this is not something that a real guitar player would say -.- +1 i meen seriously im sure most if not every guitarist knows that you have to embrace every style of playing to be an accomplished guitarist Kristofer Dahl is the only online instructor that's worth paying attention to IMO
      You can be well rounded or focus on a particular area of skill. Nothing wrong with either method. I think what Hess is hinting at is to focus on your goals. If you goal is playing speed, your not going to want to spend as much time training for difficult jazz chords.
      zero27
      how can you not have fun practicing? if im playing guitar... im having fun. but maybe im crazy and should just start focusing on making money.....
      Night_Lights
      lestat1836 wrote: Maybe Broken Fusion, Robam and his other bogus user names should watch Tom's students play at his site, or on his students' own websites. I found this at youtube today
      that was horrible! They just sit there showing off to each other.
      rich420
      This guy's an @sshole, finally get to the end of his test about your practice habits and an email address, first name and last name are all required.
      TECh2o
      At first, I thought it might be helpful. I looked at his site and went through it until I found out he wants $50+ from me. Screw that, I don't need to pay for lessons to be better at guitar, and I don't need to do everything he says to get better.
      Gorilla Fingers
      This guy might be trying to help people get better. But he's still running a business and these "articles" are nothing but large winded ads.
      Gopher1409
      Once you have the basic fundamentals down (picking, chords, and etc.) isn't it time to have fun? As long as you just make it a point to just play at least once everyday you will get better. I just like to have fun and if I come across a riff that I like, I try to develop it into something better. Then maybe add some sort of melody to go with it and so forth until you've got a song. Then you practice the song. I like to think of it as similar to a circle more than a "Y" Basically "JUST DO WAHT WORKS FOR YOU"
      forget_forever
      Tom you got a good point. Good job. Shedding light on the situaton I'd just liketo shout out to the beginners reading this article; Make sure that when your practising that you do have fun or else you'll give up really quickly. My advice to practise for you beginners is to listen to lots of your favorite music, get help from a friend of whom is advanced in guitar skills and or fiddle around in your free/non-practising time. But one thing is for sure, if you get bored with this routine, and begin looking into instructional videos, make sure you don't get any of those useless Wal-Mart bullshit videos, get a good solid video made and instructed by a proffesional because if you get anything else its an absolute waste of time and money.
      Blasphemylol
      You can apply these principles to anything in your life. this guy is probably some motivational speaker and cant even play guitar
      dash_right
      i do scales and some finger stuff most days to keep my fingers crisp then i jam this is how i play guitar my point A is present time my point B is when i am a guitarist in the next second i jus live day by day if you enjoy guitar you wont have to surround it with so many rules and bullshit im not sure hwo to explain but i have found my balance
      Sanitarium91
      What is this guy? A musician or a psychologist? I just play and try to get more difficult stuff down every once and a while. Sure, I want to be good, but I still want to enjoy playing, which is more important to me than being really good.
      Randy Johnson wrote: My name is Randy Johnson
      lol
      lestat1836
      wrote: vortexpassion wrote: "checked" means the moderator read all the posts on the thread, it does not mean he/she agrees with the post directly above. If you have not used Hess's products or programs then you are not qualified to comment on them. to bad I have...
      I doubt it, what is your real? Lets ask Tom to verify if you were really a student or not... And if you are weren't then you are risking "libel".
      vIsIbleNoIsE
      still reeks of advertisement. but at least this time he put the substance of his article at the end so that it didn't feel like he was leaving you hanging as much
      duexe
      wrote: to bad I have...
      Actually, this is interesting. What course were you taking? What kind of materials (CD, Audio Downloads, Forum access, etc)? I would love an insider view of someone whom has taken Hess lessons and not liked them. I have yet to see someone who has.
      alienboy18241
      Reading practice articles makes me feel like I'm the only person that doesn't doesn't have a set practice schedual is actually good. I'm nothing special, but I know I'm good, and it didn't come from running drills, it came from just sitting back and playing a lot. Can someone explain to me why people need to tell me that this is wrong?
      axe_man
      ReiDSaN wrote: I do get slightly sick of him linking to his own website all the time. I appreciate what he's trying to do in terms of improving my playing, yeah, but do you think I'm going to subscribe to another website just so I can be told how good or bad Tom Hess thinks I am at practicing?
      yer i think its a bit unessecery i filled out the questionaire then realised u had to sign up 2 his website and just didnt bother its not worth he should at least state next to the link you have to subscribe to his webpage. Despite what it seems i am not moaning this is very useful to me as i have neither really thought about practice structure before cheers