Ten Ways to Make Your Band More Respectable

This isn't a post about how to get fans for your band. This is about something else that's arguably just as important: how your band is viewed by the community that you need to work with. Here's ten ways to make your band appear more respectable, likeable and ultimately more professional to promoters, recording engineers, venues and more.

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This isn't a post about how to get fans for your band. This is about something else that's arguably just as important: how your band is viewed by the community that you need to work with. Here's ten ways to make your band appear more respectable, likeable and ultimately more professional to promoters, recording engineers, venues and more.

1. Be on Time

There's nothing worse than someone being late to a studio session or missing the sound check for a gig. Don't be that band! Show up on time to everything and you'll gather a reputation for being a reliable group.

2. Have the Gear

By saying this I don't mean you need to have expensive gear (that's a whole different debate), but you do need to have gear that works. If you're a guitarist make sure to always turn up with a working guitar as well as spare strings, picks and anything else you could need. It's basic logic but it's amazing how many times I've seen people turn up without any spare kit should something go wrong or need changing.

3. Support Other Bands

This may sound counter-intuitive, as aren't other bands your competition after all? Yes, but when you're part of a music scene, word quickly gets around if you're a difficult band to work with. Make sure you always treat other bands with respect. Help them out and hopefully they'll help you out too.

4. Don't Exaggerate

Don't tell your recording engineer you have a whole album ready if you don't. Don't claim to be able to play a hour long set if you can't. The people who work with you will respect you more for being honest, even if that means admitting you're not the huge act that you want to be.

5. Work for Less Money (at Least Initially)

I'm all for aspiring to make a living with music, but everyone has to start out at the bottom. That means you have to work for low pay or even just drinks money at the beginning. Forget about those big pay checks. However, also make sure you're being paid when you deserve to be. Don't let people mess you about and use you! Sadly it happens a lot in the industry.

6. Work as a Team

Make sure your band gets on and works well together. No one will want to book or work with a band that's constantly arguing and disagreeing over everything.

7. Give Tight Live Shows

Your live show needs to be well rehearsed and completely tight. Make sure everyone knows their parts and the setlist. Venues will want bands that play consistently good shows to come back.

8. Look Professional Online

Make sure your email isn't JohnSmithxxx1999@gmail.com, or no venue, promoter or label is going to contact your band. Also make sure that when you interact online it's with good grammar and spelling, you need to come across like professionals.

9. Don't Overdo Alcohol on Stage

No one wants to deal with a band so drunk that they're falling off stage. Plus venues won't appreciate you drinking all their booze if you're being paid in drinks!

10. Clean Up After Yourself

Never leave a stage or recording studio full of your mess for the owner to clean up, or they'll certainly not be inviting you back. It only takes five minutes to clean up at the end of a show or session, do it!

I hope this list helps, let me know in the comments if you have any extra tips!

About the Author: By Sebastian Schmidt.

4 comments sorted by best / new / date

    Leather Sleeves
    All great advice, but sadly, you can do all those things and it won't always matter. I've been unfortunate enough to play in a band as well as be a promoter. Some of the most popular bands in the area are also the least professional I've worked with. That being said, the top bands (ones with contracts and professional recordings) are usually very professional in their dealings. So, perhaps it would do to stress the importance of patients and steadfastness. You can do all the right things, but it may take years before anyone notices.
    SebSchmidt
    That's a very good point, all this advice is indeed totally useless without patience and perseverance!
    ghidorah89
    I like your points. If I ever knew that before, maybe my musical carrier had been more successful?! I remember that we mess the studio, drunken and bothered, cause we don't got what we wanted... Being famous and rich... XD Now, I know it better. Every young musican should regard your advices, then it should work... With patience.