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#43
Watching the video you posted, it appears you play a lot of notes with your fingers quite straight and your hand straying a fair distance from the neck. Also it was already mentioned but bend the treble strings towards the middle of the neck rather than the edge. You should also try to add one or two fingers to the next two frets behind the note you are bending, it will help to control how quickly and how far you bend.

The "bat-grip" method is very restrictive to your stretching range and really limits the chord shapes you can fret. Personally, I very rarely use this hand position and not with the thumb wrapped around to the front as pictured, but with the thumb braced at the side of the fretboard to pull against for string bends mainly. Also I sometimes use the thumb to mute the low E string for some open chords.

In my experience, the most versatile and comfortable way to hold your fretting hand is to imagine holding an orange or whatever in the palm of your hand with the fingers and thumb wrapping around the surface - place the thumb against the middle of the back of the neck and arch your fingers over the fretboard, with your fingertips against the fretboard. Best thing I can recommend is to work on fretting with your fingertips rather than the pad region.

The picture you posted looks like your hand is quite tense and the point of your thumb is turning white from tension. You should be using the padded surface of the thumb, it will then be able to pivot and slide around much easier. You need to be able to adjust your hand position (eg. for chord shapes or scale runs etc) and have your thumb quickly adjust to remain opposed to the force from your fingers, or your tone will suffer.
#44
Depends on what you're playing. If you're going for fast leads, the first way is going to be quite limiting. In the second picture, If you're playing a lot of barre chords, your thumb is going to be killing you after a while if you are constantly pressing against the back of the neck like that.
#45
This isn't the greatest picture of hand position but try to do this, with the thumb flat and wrist near straight. Notice the tilted up position which I mentioned before.
http://i43.tinypic.com/1z36vx4.jpg
Last edited by tenfold at May 8, 2009,
#46
You need to learn to comfortably play both. Your way is rock and metal but the other is blues and acoustic however if you come across a chord like this

-x
-3
-4
-5
-x
-3

you have to use your thumb to push down on the low e. So get comfortable using both position to the point where you naturaly switch between then two when necessary, if you have to think about it, practice some more
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Quote by SvnStringMaster
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#47
Quote by Elusive
You need to learn to comfortably play both. Your way is rock and metal but the other is blues and acoustic however if you come across a chord like this

-x
-3 - 2nd finger
-4 - 3rd finger
-5 - 4th finger
-x
-3 - index

you have to use your thumb to push down on the low e. So get comfortable using both position to the point where you naturaly switch between then two when necessary, if you have to think about it, practice some more



what do you mean you need to use your thumb?
#48
Quote by Casualist
what do you mean you need to use your thumb?


now go play purple haze using that fingering method. I guess if you prefer it that way but when I play Ac/Dc or Hendrix then I use my thumb to fret the low e string
Bring Back the Music

I am a gear whore... Any little odds and ends that is in the middle of nowhere, I am coming for you

UG Missle Silo

Quote by SvnStringMaster
It sounds way hot, fuzzy, and like i shoved a mic up my ass and ran up the stairs.
#49
Quote by From_The_Ashes
I'm not that talented. I can't play with my thumb wrapped around the neck to save my life.


You should learn how to, even if just a bit. It helps if your playing open chords and need to mute lower strings

BTW, your guitar is hawt. I was gonna buy that exact one for my brother so he could learn how to play but my parents said it was too expensive... I wish they would have let me, because I just KNOW my brother would play it if I woud have.
#50
There are cases when both are appropriate....bends/vibrato you should have it like position 1 for more leverage, but classical technique will give you better range for scales/soloing. Watch videos of Eric Johnson for flawless technique. Your pic 2 is incorrect classic form though as there shouldnt be a sharp bend in your thumb joint. As another poster pointed out, put the pad of your thumb on the neck, not the tip.
#52
in your first picture, i use that for when im playing chords or whatever that dont use the low e string, and my thumb is right there to mute it. the second picture is good to have lots of reach on the low e string.
#53
I hold mine in classical style like you, though for bends and vibrato I switch to the other style you showed us.
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#54
It is fine, its different for different people, its whatever is comfortable. I hold my guitars like you as well. So, its fine.

Good Luck and Have Fun
Gear:

Guitar: Oscar Schmidt Acoustic

Piano: Yamaha EA

Microphone: CAD U37
#55
in this pic im holding my guitar neck like this is bad Im holding like this ? Im from india and my english is bad sorry I didnt find good guitar teacher before 10 years so that I learned by my self now I found a good teacher but he told me that the way Im holding is wrong but I cant play the classic style I cant change ithe my style Im so suit of it but will this become a problem on the feature? im already 28 years old now I think I dont have enough time to restart the lessons what will I do please guys? I wish to hear your guys opinion so please help me. this is the pic
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#57
Quote by dNWaKE
Here's a video i made (sorry for the bad playing) to show you guys my technique. how can i improve the way i hold the neck? is it wrong? sometimes my wrist feels strained.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a0cspuBj3SQ

1) Ouch! I think you're biggest issue (and cause of discomfort) is your elbow. It shouldn't be tucked in against your body like that. That is what is causing the severe angle, torque, tension, and discomfort. It should be out and away from your body.

And no, which grip you use HUGELY matters! It is not just a preference.

The MOST important thing to consider here is mechanics.
The guitar is NOT played by the thumb. It is played by the fingers of your left hand.
The only purpose of your thumb, wrist position, AND elbow (arm) is To support proper use of your fingers (on the fretboard)
The thumb provides proper support for the fingers to press against the fretboard, that's it.
90% of the time this means a "classical" hold where only the pad is touching.
Why? because only a little pressure/contact is needed.
Why? because that little contact provides the least amount of friction when you need to quickly move the thumb from one supporting position to the next.
If you have too much friction you will have a tendency to let the thumb "drag behind" and it won't be in it's optimal support position.

The ONLY time you should switch to "baseball-bat" grips is temporarily to execute a bend (or sit in a position and execute a phrase with a lot of bends in it but no jumps to new positions) When done, get off it, and go back to normal open grip.

As you get more advanced you will find that you don't even have to shift to "baseball-bat" grip if you are strong enough to properly execute the bend from standard grip. You just move the thumb's resting spot further toward you around the C to get more "diagonal" resistance.

Also, when bending, you should only wrap your thumb around the neck if you need to (need the extra power). If you don't, don't - don't make this your default for everything.
Many times your thumb can be "wrapped" but still curved under the neck without coming up over the fretboard (it's on the side of the C instead of under the neck).

However, if you have a really flat neck profile, you have no choice but to wrap as you have no C to get leverage against.

The only other time to wrap your thumb around the neck is to use it as an extra finger to fret the 6th string (or sometimes to mute)

So, yes, you can come out of standard "classical" grip, but do it for a reason and know that you are sacrificing your optimal grip for position transition speed.

Happy Jammin!
Last edited by InfiniStudent at Jan 11, 2013,
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