#1
look man... i just want an answer, don't bash or attack. & i really don't give a shit if there's another thread on this.
i just got back from lifting and i wanna flex my tiny bit of theory knowledge so help me out.

1 - 3 - 5 chords... i can construct, they're coming to me and i'm liking how it's all getting more familiar.

now then,
1 - b3 - 5

1 - b3 - b5

1 - b3 - 5 - b7
wtf are the "b3, b5, b7"? i got my info off the internet and it doesn't really explain what exactly those are. and if you can... explain why "b" was put in front of the number. thanks.
#2
The numbers 1 3 and 5 are numbers referring to the degrees of the scale.

In the key of C Major (C D E F G A B)

1 3 5 is the equivalent to C E and G.

When you take a "b" and put it in front of a number (b3 for example) it just means that you're flatting the note which would make it C Eb G.

1 3 5 = Major Chord C E G
1 b3 5 = Minor Chord C Eb G
1 b3 b5 = Diminished Chord C Eb Gb
1 b3 5 b7 = Minor 7th Chord C Eb G Bb
Last edited by dannydawiz at Oct 29, 2012,
#3
Quote by dannydawiz
The numbers 1 3 and 5 are numbers referring to the degrees of the scale.

In the key of C Major (C D E F G A B)

1 3 5 is the equivalent to C E and G.

When you take a "b" and put it in front of a number (b3 for example) it just means that you're flatting the note which would make it C Eb G.

1 3 5 = Major Chord C E G
1 b3 5 = Minor Chord C Eb G
1 b3 b5 = Diminished Chord C Eb Gb
1 b3 5 b7 = Minor 7th Chord C Eb G Bb


all i needed... thanks mate, gonna go experiment .
#4
One day when Im old... Im gonna tell my grandkids how once there was an amiable and helpful thread in MT.....
Quote by AlanHB
It's the same as all other harmony. Surround yourself with skulls and candles if it helps.
#5
I'll try not to upset the helpfulness of this thread.

The "b3" interval, with respect to chords is also termed a "minor third", and is the equivalent of 3 semi tones (and as mentioned, it produces a minor chord).

A "Major 3rd" is a four semitone interval, from the "1" to "3", and it produces a major chord.

These intervals are determined by counting up the intervals of the major scale. (minor scales too, but we won't get into that for now).

One thing that you didn't ask, but perhaps should have is this, "does the 1, 3, 5 thing, apply to the other degrees of the scale"? Yes, absolutely.

Take the key of C major; C , D, E, F, G, A, B, & C (octave).

The 1, 3, 5 formula applies to every degree of the scale. Because of the tonal spacing of the major scale, different starting notes, will form different types of chords. (Major, minor, & diminished)

So, 1, 3, 5 ,starting on C, equals C, E, G, and that's a major chord.

If we start on the D note, we still form the chord with the 1, 3, 5 formula. (All it really is, is use a note, skip a note, use a note, skip a note, and use a note.

So, starting on D in C major, we get the notes D, F, A. D to F is only 3 semitones. So the chord on the second degree of the C major scale has a b3rd, and that makes it a minor chord. (A D major chord would be, D, F#, A).
Last edited by Captaincranky at Oct 30, 2012,
#6
Quote by J2G
look man... i just want an answer, don't bash or attack. & i really don't give a shit if there's another thread on this.
i just got back from lifting and i wanna flex my tiny bit of theory knowledge so help me out.

1 - 3 - 5 chords... i can construct, they're coming to me and i'm liking how it's all getting more familiar.

now then,
1 - b3 - 5

1 - b3 - b5

1 - b3 - 5 - b7
wtf are the "b3, b5, b7"? i got my info off the internet and it doesn't really explain what exactly those are. and if you can... explain why "b" was put in front of the number. thanks.


b3 = minor 3rd
b5 = diminished 5th
b7 = minor 7th

They have a flat sign ('b') in front of them because rock/jazz notation uses the major interval (2nds, 3rds, 6ths, 7ths) or perfect interval (4ths, 5ths) as a reference point and notates other intervals in relation to them.

So a 1-3-5 chord is:

Tonic, Major 3rd, Perfect 5th (a Major triad)

While a 1-b3-5 chord is:

Tonic, Minor 3rd, Perfect 5th (a Minor triad)

A 1-b3-b5 chord is:

Tonic, Minor 3rd, Diminished 5th (a Diminished triad)

And a 1-b3-5-b7 chord is:

Tonic, Minor 3rd, Perfect 5th, Minor 7th (a "7th" chord)

Sharpened intervals are the same:

1-3-#5 = Tonic, Major 3rd, Augmented 5th (an Augmented triad)
Quote by Hail
oh shut up with that /mu/ bullshit. fidget house shouldn't even be a genre, why in the world would it deserve its own subgenres you twat