Page 2 of 2
#41
Quote by W4RP1G
I don't think their intent was portability, was it? The robot tuners would suggest that they just wanted to advance their robot line, and I guess adding more electronics makes sense if that was their goal.

But I agree, if their intent was portability, they went about it all wrong. If you can afford to use a $4000 guitar as a travel guitar, I'm guessing you could afford to travel with an Axe FX or some other such unit as well.


Maybe I'm wrong but it seems to me this is the sort of thing that would appeal more to someone on a budget or a noob who doesn't want to buy a bunh of pedals.
#42
But it's too pricey for that.

It has to be for the guy who has $$$$, but does not want to fool around getting a variety of pedals or amps.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!


alhaq369
It is very impotent to success a business.
#43
Make all the shapes you want in the end, its still going to have 6 strings etc.

How bout a real advance or leap forward and instead of steel strings, the are 6 beams of laser light that players manipulate to make music? The more I think about it, the more it could actually work!
#44
I think more needs to be looked into in terms of true temperament and the like, though at the end of the day, humans are human shaped so there is a limitation to practical and comfortable designs.

1977 Burny FLG70
2004 EBMM JP6
2016 SE Holcolmb
#45
Quote by Axe Murderer
Make all the shapes you want in the end, its still going to have 6 strings etc.

How bout a real advance or leap forward and instead of steel strings, the are 6 beams of laser light that players manipulate to make music? The more I think about it, the more it could actually work!


That wouldn't really be a guitar, though. Call it a laser harp.
#47
I like the Gibson Corvus, kind of an odd shape for a company with such a recognizable line of guitars. Also the Gibson RD, which looks like a splattered Firebird.
#48
Quote by Axe Murderer

How bout a real advance or leap forward and instead of steel strings, the are 6 beams of laser light that players manipulate to make music? The more I think about it, the more it could actually work!


Here's just a few that I know of- there are more:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4CnRsTaShUU&feature=youtube_gdata_player

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1sgdlaRv2hk&feature=youtube_gdata_player

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Md7qnLYtxqw&feature=youtube_gdata_player
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!


alhaq369
It is very impotent to success a business.
#49
The shape does not really matter,its the wood used to make it and the crafts man,what worries me is all the electronic suff added these days, and that goes wiht amps as well
#50
Quote by dannyalcatraz


Exactly. With more refinement and better technology, it could be future replacment for "traditional" guitars.
#51
Quote by Axe Murderer
Exactly. With more refinement and better technology, it could be future replacment for "traditional" guitars.


Well, maybe, maybe not.

I imagine a tremolo on one of those- after the proper programming and engineering work was done- would NEVER go out of tune, regardless of how many dive-bombs you did.

But it would take some super-sophisticated programmiforgo enable you to do natural or pinch harmonics on one of those.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!


alhaq369
It is very impotent to success a business.
#52
Quote by dannyalcatraz
Well, maybe, maybe not.

I imagine a tremolo on one of those- after the proper programming and engineering work was done- would NEVER go out of tune, regardless of how many dive-bombs you did.

But it would take some super-sophisticated programmiforgo enable you to do natural or pinch harmonics on one of those.


Probably not to be honest, harmonics are a natural function of string length and the node point you choose to deaden the string at to bring the fundamental out. Once you can find out where the finger is along the picking side of the string finding out what note the harmonic would be is relatively simple maths.

That said, I really don't see these replacing conventional instruments, at least not any time soon anyway. For a start I think guitarists on the whole are very much set in their (our) ways, and beyond that there's something primal about guitar and actually hitting the strings. I don't think normal guitars will go away any time soon for the same reason we still have real violins, pianos, drums and so on. Hell, some eastern instruments have designs going back hundreds or thousands of years and people still play those...
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Album.
Legion.
#53
Quote by Huge Guy
Maybe I'm wrong but it seems to me this is the sort of thing that would appeal more to someone on a budget or a noob who doesn't want to buy a bunh of pedals.


... but it's $6000. That could get you a cheaper robot guitar and an Axe FX.

Quote by Axe Murderer
Exactly. With more refinement and better technology, it could be future replacment for "traditional" guitars.


Maybe for modelling guitars, but the way the wood responds and resonates with the vibrating strings is a big part of its tone. Stringless instruments cannot replicate this.

It'll lead to some interesting playing styles... infinite sustain and fretless for mega slides will be easy, but I can't imagine it being easy to play. It would be quite weird not feeling if you're fretting a string and which string you're picking, and I'd struggle.
#54
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Probably not to be honest, harmonics are a natural function of string length and the node point you choose to deaden the string at to bring the fundamental out. Once you can find out where the finger is along the picking side of the string finding out what note the harmonic would be is relatively simple maths.

That said, I really don't see these replacing conventional instruments, at least not any time soon anyway. For a start I think guitarists on the whole are very much set in their (our) ways, and beyond that there's something primal about guitar and actually hitting the strings. I don't think normal guitars will go away any time soon for the same reason we still have real violins, pianos, drums and so on. Hell, some eastern instruments have designs going back hundreds or thousands of years and people still play those...


Of course! Even Strats and Tele's are pretty much the same as they were in the 50's.
#55
Probably not to be honest, harmonics are a natural function of string length and the node point you choose to deaden the string at to bring the fundamental out. Once you can find out where the finger is along the picking side of the string finding out what note the harmonic would be is relatively simple maths.


Yes & no.

While it IS a simple function of string length, the laser guitar would have to distinguish the difference between "fretting" and "deadening" the string at a given point. And it's a similar issue with things like palm muting.

Namely, the guitar's programs have to understand pressure and location at a very sophisticated and analog level, not just "the beam tuned to G was interrupted at point X, which converts into _____ note." When is a partial eclipse of the beam a harmonic or a muting action?

The Kitara does an excellent job of figuring out stuff in the axis of movement "along the string," but the axis of movement corresponding to depressing the string still seems more like a keyboard.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!


alhaq369
It is very impotent to success a business.
Page 2 of 2