Gman98664
Registered User
Join date: Sep 2008
177 IQ
#1
Guitar God's,

I have a song I wrote with the verse having a 'A B Dm A' progression. Having problems coming up with a decent lead. The chorus has a 'A F G A' progression. Any body know of other songs that use the verse chord progression? I am looking for ideas, licks, and leads.

Thanks, Gman
amonamarthmetal
Registered User
Join date: Aug 2008
1,808 IQ
#4
Quote by Peaceful Rocker
It's gman. With gman, all chords are powerful

I think im gonna quote that and sig it, but replace gman with my name
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food1010
Bassist
Join date: Jun 2007
1,660 IQ
#6
What sort of harmonic rhythm are you using?

You're going to want to look at how the notes in each chord transition.

E  F# A  E
C# D# F  C#
A  B  D  A
When you lay it out like that it helps you visualize your target tones and how they move. Start with one note per chord and just play chord tones. Try some steps vs. leaps (i.e. C# B A A vs. A F# F A).

Then from there you're just going to add ornamentation and some rhythm.

Looking at the melody in Her Diamonds, the chorus revolves around G A and B (A B C# transposed into A). Really, it's just a way to avoid the dissonance of the Dm by letting the chord just slip by and using the A chord tones in anticipation of the A chord.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Nov 6, 2012,
RealUnrealRob
Lazy Physicist
Join date: Sep 2008
263 IQ
#7
Or screw around with it till you find a nice melody
Last edited by RealUnrealRob at Nov 6, 2012,
food1010
Bassist
Join date: Jun 2007
1,660 IQ
#8
Quote by RealUnrealRob
Or screw around with it until you find a nice melody
Fool proof. I like it.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
ibanez1511
Registered User
Join date: Feb 2008
282 IQ
#10
This is I to II IVm I

lydian mode would work for the 1st two chords.
Then D melodic minor for the Dm and A , would sound nice.

in lilypond (www.lilypond.org) code here are some target notes


\version "2.16.0"
\relative c'
{
\clef "treble_8"
| cis2.\3 e4\3 |
%bar1
| dis1\3 |
%bar2
| d2\3 a4\4 b4\3 |
%bar3
| cis1\4 |
%bar4

}
HotspurJr
Registered User
Join date: Jul 2011
191 IQ
#11
Quote by Gman98664
Guitar God's,

I have a song I wrote with the verse having a 'A B Dm A' progression. Having problems coming up with a decent lead. The chorus has a 'A F G A' progression. Any body know of other songs that use the verse chord progression? I am looking for ideas, licks, and leads.


Play your progression.

Listen.

What do you want to hear?

Don't just jam away, hoping you'll find something. LISTEN first. Sometimes it helps to loop the progression and listen to it without your guitar in your hands - sing.

Don't look for licks, look for a melody. You can embellish the melody with licks later, but find the melody first. And find the melody in your head before you try to find it on the fretboard. If that's hard, work on your ear.
MaggaraMarine
Slapping the bass.
Join date: Oct 2009
3,473 IQ
#12
Quote by ibanez1511
This is I to II IVm I

lydian mode would work for the 1st two chords.
Then D melodic minor for the Dm and A , would sound nice.

in lilypond (www.lilypond.org) code here are some target notes


\version "2.16.0"
\relative c'
{
\clef "treble_8"
| cis2.\3 e4\3 |
%bar1
| dis1\3 |
%bar2
| d2\3 a4\4 b4\3 |
%bar3
| cis1\4 |
%bar4

}

That's not a good idea. I mean, you don't need to change scales. The progression is in A major, so use A major and accidentals. But you must learn how different notes sound over different chords. And this isn't a diatonic chord progression so there are some notes that don't fit the all the chords that well. They do fit if you know what you are doing. You can make all the notes fit all the chords if that's the sound you are looking for.

Try to find a melody to fit the chords. It's easier to find it in your head if you don't know what to play over the chords on your guitar. And still you should know what you are doing. If you sing, you aren't going to end up playing scales up and down at the light speed. The melody is going to be much more melodic and sound more like your guitar is singing. It won't sound like a typical guitar shred solo. (If a shred solo is what you are after, then don't sing, just shred.)
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
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MaggaraMarine
Slapping the bass.
Join date: Oct 2009
3,473 IQ
#14
Quote by ibanez1511
i can see how this way of thinking would produce a more vocal approach. sometime combing scales things could sound very stepwise and well scale like

I see your point in changing scales and that's the easiest way to do it. But yeah, many times that kind of thinking makes you play certain kinds of stuff and kind of limits you. You can play whatever notes over whatever chords if you want and sometimes dissonance sounds good. It kind of gives more tension that wants to resolve somewhere. If you want to shred, then thinking in scales might be the best way. It's all about what you are after. But this progression sounds like you want it to be more melodic.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Gman98664
Registered User
Join date: Sep 2008
177 IQ
#15
Thanks to everyone that responded to this post. I got a few ideas. I actually think I already new the answer myself but your posts helped me think the lead through.

gman98664