#1
When playing leads over a quick chord progression how do you go about really hearing the notes you are playing (intervallic relationships/passing etc.) over the chords? I always need to be at least 85 % aware of the relationships because if I am not , I just get lost of what I am hearing in a sense.

So if the chords are moving too fast what should you do? If you just say use one scale then in a sense you are just playing with your fingers hoping for something to sound good...because the chords are just moving too fast and you cannot possible be aware of everything.
Last edited by Unreal T at Nov 16, 2012,
#2
Plan ahead, use your ears. At some point it should stop being "x intersects with y therefore I should play this note" and become "I'm going to play this note over this section in 10 seconds because it will be cool". It sounds like a step backwards buts it's simply an integration of the approach. The further you can plan ahead, the easier it becomes over quick changes.
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#3
You just need to be aware of what is happening and plan ahead, like the gut above me said. However, if you don't want to play modal over chord changes, and stick to one scale, just accentuate the chord changes with a note within the scale. For example: If you'r in the key of a minor and your first chord is an A, just begin with the A note of the scale and if the next one is a C chord, make sure you land on a C note when the chord is played. You could also use arpeggio's to accentuate the chords en fill em up in between with lead licks. Hope this helps
#4
Quote by AlanHB
Plan ahead, use your ears. At some point it should stop being "x intersects with y therefore I should play this note" and become "I'm going to play this note over this section in 10 seconds because it will be cool". It sounds like a step backwards buts it's simply an integration of the approach. The further you can plan ahead, the easier it becomes over quick changes.

This pretty much, I'd summarize this by saying "don't overthink it and just play what you hear in your head"
#6
Quote by z4twenny
This pretty much, I'd summarize this by saying "don't overthink it and just play what you hear in your head"


+1 to this and Alan's comment.

There are no rules for being "epic" - you have to be able to come up with an epic melody.

If you're still consciously thinking about intervals and chord relationships, that's fine, it's a normal stage of development, but it means you're thinking too academically still. Work on your ear (functional ear trainer from miles.be - different from any other ear trainer out there!) so you can let go of the academic labels and think in music.


(Just to be clear: I like the academic stuff. I'm a big fan of learning it. You will be glad that you know it. But now that you know it, you need to make it intuitive.)
#7
good advice in this thread so far. what hotspur said is key - to really progress, it's important to delve into the academics of the whole thing. but what's even more important, as he pointed out, is making the academic concepts intuitive. knowing how to construct an Fmaj9 chord is all well and good, but if you don't know how to make use of it (or what it will sound like in context), you don't really own the information to the level you want to get to.

remember that a good technique is often slower in its early stages. at this point, just keep at it. get more experience.
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#8
This is a great thread and I have a very similar problem. My band plays some up tempo power chord riffs during the solo breaks and I find it difficult to come up with meaningful solos as I usually panic and return to pentatonioc and minor scale shapes
#9
Quote by Kerbache
This is a great thread and I have a very similar problem. My band plays some up tempo power chord riffs during the solo breaks and I find it difficult to come up with meaningful solos as I usually panic and return to pentatonioc and minor scale shapes


Work on your ear!

You don't want to be thinking in terms of scale shapes, you want to be thinking in terms of music.

When in doubt, start with the melody of the song. You can't play a solo if you can't play the melody - but if you can't instantly play the melody of the song you're playing, then your ear needs work.
#10
I know this sounds dumb, but try playing with your eyes closed. I used to always be in a box when I played, but I realized I listened more when I closed my eyes. It has helped me to develop my ear and pay more attention to it when things like this come along.
#11
^ Not dumb at all. My jazz teacher used to make us improvise in class.... in the dark. Serious.

Lights off, blinds down. Two or 3 of us at a time, chords, melody, improvisation.

It made us rely on our senses and how to react to changes in rhythm, pitch, dynamics, without being able to see.
#13
a DAW helps too

play something, record it, play it back to yourself. it becomes obvious very quickly what sounds inspired and what sounds like wanking back and forth
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#14
To add onto what Hail said, you should know your material, hands down no problem. Know not just what you're supposed to be playing, but figure out what kinds of cues are given for, or when exactly the chord changes. Maybe the drums have a snare or cymbal hit, or the rhythm accentuates the last beat before the change happens.
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#15
Quote by mdc
^ Not dumb at all. My jazz teacher used to make us improvise in class.... in the dark. Serious.

Lights off, blinds down. Two or 3 of us at a time, chords, melody, improvisation.

It made us rely on our senses and how to react to changes in rhythm, pitch, dynamics, without being able to see.

I used to do that all the time. I'd turn off the lights and jam to either homemade backing tracks or a song from a cd or radio. It was great for ear training
#16
Quote by a0kalittlema0n
I know this sounds dumb, but try playing with your eyes closed. I used to always be in a box when I played, but I realized I listened more when I closed my eyes. It has helped me to develop my ear and pay more attention to it when things like this come along.


I've just started doing this, and really does help you listen more instead of just playing in box's to much
#17
some quick advice.

the quick progressions are collection of epic solos that already exist.
if you know the tones of each chord you can target and connect them.
also certain runs reoccur so if you know how to handle them in one key, you should be able to reapply them in another.
the correct scales will help you add extensions to the progression.