#1
My strings seem to have become "twangy" I don't remember them being this bad before. Time for change?
"Music is the only thing that makes sense anymore man, play it loud enough it keeps the demons at bay." - Jojo from ATU
Currently Own:
Ibanez GAX70
Peavey VYPYR 15.
Mitchell Acoustic M0100
Johnson Acoustic JG 100
#2
Every time you tune up do a quick intonation check, it only takes a few seconds. As soon as it drifts you change your strings.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#3
Thanks Cath. I can't remember when I last changed these things. Granted I have 2 guitars that cycle between my dorm and home so I just recently started playing this one again. Also, pretty sure my intonation has been off by a little bit the way this is setup but I don't trust my tuner enough to try to fix it lol
"Music is the only thing that makes sense anymore man, play it loud enough it keeps the demons at bay." - Jojo from ATU
Currently Own:
Ibanez GAX70
Peavey VYPYR 15.
Mitchell Acoustic M0100
Johnson Acoustic JG 100
#4
You don't need a very good tuner to check intonation. Buy a new set of strings, set the intonation and then keep your eye on it.

As for a tuner - do you have a smartphone?
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
Last edited by Cathbard at Dec 5, 2012,
#5
Thanks again man. I have an Ipod touch. Also have a cheap tuner that can with my starter pack acoustic.
"Music is the only thing that makes sense anymore man, play it loud enough it keeps the demons at bay." - Jojo from ATU
Currently Own:
Ibanez GAX70
Peavey VYPYR 15.
Mitchell Acoustic M0100
Johnson Acoustic JG 100
#6
I'm an android man. If the Ipod has a built in mic, search the app store for a tuner app. I know nothing about Apple stuff but a quick search shows a few of them available.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#7
^+1

I've been using "Cleartune" on my iphone for a year or so, you have to pay for it, but it's more than worth the small cost!
#8
If you are considering starting a thread to ask if you need to change your strings then you need to change your strings...

Cath - I've never heard, or personally noticed, that strings getting old affects intonation. Interesting. I'll have to watch for that. I assume this is a confirmed phenomenon for you?
Quote by Cathbard
Quote by Raijouta
Unless its electronic drums.

BURN THE WITCH!!!!!
Last edited by tubetime86 at Dec 5, 2012,
#9
Quote by tubetime86
If you are considering starting a thread to ask if you need to change your strings then you need to change your strings...

Cath - I've never heard, or personally noticed, that strings getting old affects intonation. Interesting. I'll have to watch for that. I assume this is a confirmed phenomenon for you?




Eagerly awaiting answer, as this appears to presume that strings stretch at different rates along their length...
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#10
Quote by tubetime86
If you are considering starting a thread to ask if you need to change your strings then you need to change your strings...

Cath - I've never heard, or personally noticed, that strings getting old affects intonation. Interesting. I'll have to watch for that. I assume this is a confirmed phenomenon for you?

Yeah, I had old strings on my guitar and the intonation was way off. Then I changed my strings and the intonation was good again. I actually adjusted my intonation with the old strings but they didn't intonate really well, no matter how I tried so I changed the strings and the intonation was different. Adjusted it again and now my guitar has good enough intonation.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#11
Quote by Arby911


Eagerly awaiting answer, as this appears to presume that strings stretch at different rates along their length...

Exactly. I'll second the popcorn.



Quote by MaggaraMarine
Yeah, I had old strings on my guitar and the intonation was way off. Then I changed my strings and the intonation was good again. I actually adjusted my intonation with the old strings but they didn't intonate really well, no matter how I tried so I changed the strings and the intonation was different. Adjusted it again and now my guitar has good enough intonation.

Hmmm. A bit flimsy without any other evidence, but I'll accept this as Exhibit A. I'd like to hear a theory on the why though.
Quote by Cathbard
Quote by Raijouta
Unless its electronic drums.

BURN THE WITCH!!!!!
#12
Thanks for the input. I found a free Ipod tuner that had good reviews so I'll try that and compare it to my other tuner and see what happens. Also, I know I need to change the strings anyway but I figured I'd check to make sure it would fix the issue rather then change them and find out I needed to do something else first
"Music is the only thing that makes sense anymore man, play it loud enough it keeps the demons at bay." - Jojo from ATU
Currently Own:
Ibanez GAX70
Peavey VYPYR 15.
Mitchell Acoustic M0100
Johnson Acoustic JG 100
#13
I discovered the intonation thing when I was having trouble with my first guitar (ultimately I had to move the entire bridge about 5 mm). When the strings were old I'd run out of adjustment.
It does make sense though. As the strings get older they are no longer of uniform density along the length of the string due to corosion and mechanical wear against the frets. Pretty obvious when you think about it, huh? A thinner string is a higher pitch.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
Last edited by Cathbard at Dec 5, 2012,
#14
These things need changing desperately but my intonation is spot on. Afraid to mess with it now lol
"Music is the only thing that makes sense anymore man, play it loud enough it keeps the demons at bay." - Jojo from ATU
Currently Own:
Ibanez GAX70
Peavey VYPYR 15.
Mitchell Acoustic M0100
Johnson Acoustic JG 100
#15
Quote by Cathbard
I discovered the intonation thing when I was having trouble with my first guitar (ultimately I had to move the entire bridge about 5 mm). When the strings were old I'd run out of adjustment.
It does make sense though. As the strings get older they are no longer of uniform density along the length of the string due to corosion and mechanical wear against the frets. Pretty obvious when you think about it, huh? A thinner string is a higher pitch.


No, not really.

I mean yes, of course mechanical wear and corrosion can and will affect anything susceptible to same, but I'm skeptical that the amounts that we normally see on guitar strings have a significant impact.

Maybe if your strings were 5 years old and crusty, but I can't see it with any reasonable cleaning and changing regimen.

I might buy that strings continue to stretch over time, which will (must, in fact) thin them out, but it should happen in a relatively uniform fashion along the length?

I've also considered that the 'picked' area may work-harden over time, causing it to have different resonant characteristics than the rest of the string, making intonation impossible.

I guess my point is I can see several mechanisms that MIGHT cause the phenomenon noted, but I can find nothing that supports any of them, excepting only anecdotes.

And perhaps it doesn't matter, because strings are cheap, so if you think it helps, change 'em?
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#16
Well if they are going to stretch in a non-uniform way then wouldn't it happen throughout the life of the string? Inconsistencies in production, or any number of factors could contribute to that, but I just haven't ever noticed it. My intonation is pretty much static for months at a time, with many string changes and varying degrees of string wear.
Quote by Cathbard
Quote by Raijouta
Unless its electronic drums.

BURN THE WITCH!!!!!
#17
Do you check the intonation every time you change strings? I do. It isn't uncommon to have to make minor adjustments.
Start checking it on a regular basis and you'll see I'm right, old strings drift.

Arby, the top E string is the one that drifts most. That is only 9 or 10 thou, so a very small dent or amount of corrosion amounts to quite a lot relatively to the thickness of the string. The fact that the thinner strings suffer more supports my hypothesis of non uniformity causing drift.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
Last edited by Cathbard at Dec 6, 2012,