#1
Basically, I no longer have my computer. I have decided to get a laptop and will transfer Ableton etc over to it.


Im still recording at home, but plan to just to the demos at home then go to a studio to do the finished product so it can have drums/be done in a correctly treated room.


However, recently I've been getting more into trance/electronic music. Can anybody recommend a pc good for this? as in, one that won't get all laggy, can handle a lot of WAVs playing at once etc


Budget wise £300 would be ideal, could possibly go a little more if it was REALLY worth it. Im clueless with electronics so its a new area for me.
#2
£300 won't get you much but here's what I'd look for spec wise:

-At least a Core i5 Processor if not Core i7
-At least 4gb of RAM. If you're ordering like a custom Dell, get as low as possible and upgrade on your own
-A 7200RPM Hard Drive. Gonna be hard to find at that price but if you can, do it.
-Dedicated Video Card (nVidia or ATI). The Intel onboard graphics usually piggybacks off the CPU and your RAM. A Dedicated one doesn't

You may need to step up your budget but that's what I'd look for.
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#3
I'd say processor: over 2.3GHz if you don't want lag. Close all other programs too, to help.
RAM - 3 of 4GB. Agree with a high-speed hard drive.
I would advise looking for good deals under £400 - Christmas is a great time for getting good deals!
#4
Quote by lockwolf
£300 won't get you much but here's what I'd look for spec wise:

-At least a Core i5 Processor if not Core i7
-At least 4gb of RAM. If you're ordering like a custom Dell, get as low as possible and upgrade on your own
-A 7200RPM Hard Drive. Gonna be hard to find at that price but if you can, do it.
-Dedicated Video Card (nVidia or ATI). The Intel onboard graphics usually piggybacks off the CPU and your RAM. A Dedicated one doesn't

You may need to step up your budget but that's what I'd look for.



The budget is negotiable - I could go more but it's got to be worth it.


Why do you need a video card for audio?


Was planning to have a separate hard drive incase the laptop broke - then I'd still have all my stuff.


http://www.argos.co.uk/static/Browse/ID72/33014243/c_1/1|category_root|Technology|33006169/c_2/2|33006169|Laptops+and+PCs|33007795/c_3/3|cat_33007795|Laptops+and+netbooks|33014243/r_001/4|Brands|Toshiba|1.htm <<<some deals on there, but none really hitting your specs.


Quote by AcousticMetal99
I'd say processor: over 2.3GHz if you don't want lag. Close all other programs too, to help.
RAM - 3 of 4GB. Agree with a high-speed hard drive.
I would advise looking for good deals under £400 - Christmas is a great time for getting good deals!



Exactly why I was going to buy one now - plus I started my new job so I have the option now.
#5
I work at Best Buy and I will tell you this. Go for ASUS brand computers. They have the lowest return rate out of any other computer brand we sell because they design and build most of their own parts. They actually sell their parts to Dell, HP and even Apple. All of my coworkers and I love them. Honestly do it.

If you need to then Samsung will work as well and if you must go with Toshiba.

And also don't be afraid to get AMD brand processors either, go for A8 (Intel i5 equivalent) or A10 (Intel i7 equivalent) processors. One plus of getting AMD is that the graphics will be better in them than the Intel computers around that budget. Only because AMD uses their own graphics cards and they work well because they'll be dedicated. But if you won't game on there or watch full HD movies while doing other things then it won't even matter.

But in terms of specs and everything those guys ^above me^ already nailed it.
Last edited by Z0S07657 at Dec 5, 2012,
#6
Quote by Z0S07657
I work at Best Buy and I will tell you this. Go for ASUS brand computers. They have the lowest return rate out of any other computer brand we sell because they design and build most of their own parts. They actually sell their parts to Dell, HP and even Apple. All of my coworkers and I love them. Honestly do it.

If you need to then Samsung will work as well and if you must go with Toshiba.

And also don't be afraid to get AMD brand processors either, go for A8 (Intel i5 equivalent) or A10 (Intel i7 equivalent) processors. One plus of getting AMD is that the graphics will be better in them than the Intel computers around that budget. Only because AMD uses their own graphics cards and they work well because they'll be dedicated. But if you won't game on there or watch full HD movies while doing other things then it won't even matter.

But in terms of specs and everything those guys ^above me^ already nailed it.


I have no brand preference - I just want something that will do the job. And the laptop will be for music and a bit of web browsing - HD movies and Super Blue+Green+Purple Ray don't matter to me, got the tv for that.


Main issue I've had in the past is the shit load of lag and slowing down, if I can stop that, get something that works with Ableton and can always get a separate hard drive then I'd be happy - it's just an area where people say stuff to me and I have literally no ****ing clue - like beyond clueless.
#8
Alright then just honestly go for ASUS, or Samsung brand computers. For every computer you get you just need to maintain it. I mean simple things, every fews weeks clean out the disk drive, just search for it in the computer, defrag the computer every once or twice a year (doing it too much can damage the hard drive) and get a program called Tune-Up Utilities which will pretty much just do all that and more automatically.

I'll try to actually explain the stuff too as best as I can.

The processor is the brain of the computer, it processes the information. The speeds are read in GHz or gigahertz. They range from 1 to about 4 GHz (that's what you'll usually find in a store generally.) When you read a tag it'll say something like Intel i7 processor running at 2.6GHz and what that means is that the processor will comfortably run at that high of speed when it needs to.

Intel basically has 3 kinds of processors

i3 (Suited for general people just surfing the internet)

i5 (Suited for people doing more intensive things like audio engineering, photo editing)

and i7 (suited for intense gamers, people doing HEAVY music production, video editing, etc.)

But the thing to remember is look for the GHz, for you you'd be fine with an i5 or i7 that can run at about 2.4 Ghz and up.

RAM is basically like a table, the bigger the table is the more stuff it can hold on there. In other words more RAM = more programs you can have open at one time.

I was actually transferring about 56GB of files and programs and whatnot on from one hard drive to another, with Google Chrome open, and I had iTunes open. That only took about 3 Gb of RAM. So for you 4 GB or even 6 will be plenty.
#9
I really need to impress on the importance of a 7200rpm hard drive. This is the primary factor that will determine whether or not you will get, in your own words, "a lot of WAVs playing at once."

The bus speed to an external hard drive is insufficient. A 5400rpm drive that is built into about 99% of all laptops is also going to be mostly insufficient.

The reason for the dedicated video card is this: A dedicated video card has its own memory, and will therefore not access the RAM that is part of your computer. An integrated video card (basically, a chip on the motherboard) does not have it's own RAM, and will therefore use up a surprising amount of your system RAM on generating graphics.

I second the motion that you get a desktop. WAY more bang for the buck. Literally any off-the-shelf desktop will do what you need it to do, and will cost you about $300.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#10
Quote by axemanchris
I really need to impress on the importance of a 7200rpm hard drive. This is the primary factor that will determine whether or not you will get, in your own words, "a lot of WAVs playing at once."

The bus speed to an external hard drive is insufficient. A 5400rpm drive that is built into about 99% of all laptops is also going to be mostly insufficient.

The reason for the dedicated video card is this: A dedicated video card has its own memory, and will therefore not access the RAM that is part of your computer. An integrated video card (basically, a chip on the motherboard) does not have it's own RAM, and will therefore use up a surprising amount of your system RAM on generating graphics.

I second the motion that you get a desktop. WAY more bang for the buck. Literally any off-the-shelf desktop will do what you need it to do, and will cost you about $300.

CT



I was wanting a laptop more for its portability and lack of wires. My room is pretty small. Obviously though, I want the best thing for my music.

Quote by Z0S07657
Alright then just honestly go for ASUS, or Samsung brand computers. For every computer you get you just need to maintain it. I mean simple things, every fews weeks clean out the disk drive, just search for it in the computer, defrag the computer every once or twice a year (doing it too much can damage the hard drive) and get a program called Tune-Up Utilities which will pretty much just do all that and more automatically.

I'll try to actually explain the stuff too as best as I can.

The processor is the brain of the computer, it processes the information. The speeds are read in GHz or gigahertz. They range from 1 to about 4 GHz (that's what you'll usually find in a store generally.) When you read a tag it'll say something like Intel i7 processor running at 2.6GHz and what that means is that the processor will comfortably run at that high of speed when it needs to.

Intel basically has 3 kinds of processors

i3 (Suited for general people just surfing the internet)

i5 (Suited for people doing more intensive things like audio engineering, photo editing)

and i7 (suited for intense gamers, people doing HEAVY music production, video editing, etc.)

But the thing to remember is look for the GHz, for you you'd be fine with an i5 or i7 that can run at about 2.4 Ghz and up.

RAM is basically like a table, the bigger the table is the more stuff it can hold on there. In other words more RAM = more programs you can have open at one time.

I was actually transferring about 56GB of files and programs and whatnot on from one hard drive to another, with Google Chrome open, and I had iTunes open. That only took about 3 Gb of RAM. So for you 4 GB or even 6 will be plenty.


Thanks for explaining that man, it makes a bit more sense - I'm not anti-technology, I'm just not very good at adapting to it - I play acoustic most of the time because amps tend to break and piss me off lol I feel like a caveman.
#11
I'm coming at this thread with a new angle:


Rather than ask for a laptop, why don't I say what I want to do and run and then ask for a choice based on that right? So


I mainly use Ableton, occasionally Massive and Nexus as additional plug ins.

I want to make electronic music which may have a lot of tracks going at once - say 30.


Suggestions based on this? Budget wise let's say £600 tops.