cakekindel
Registered User
Join date: Dec 2012
21 IQ
#1
Just wondering if someone who's played guitar for years, and therefore tunes and retunes often and has to hear differences to get the optimal harmony from the strings, would then be better at hearing differences in sounds/notes/frequencies (pitch perception). I'd like to hear personal opinions AND any and all scientific backing to this topic. Thanks!
Hail
i'm a mean bully
Join date: Jan 2010
431 IQ
#2
once you get a good tuner you just stop giving a shit tbh

plus you're talking about training for something similar to perfect pitch which, honestly, is just about useless. if you have a decent relative pitch, you can do anything your heart desires short of annoy your musician friends at parties where, frankly, if it's so boring that you feel the need to show people that you have the ability to interpret a pitch outside of the context of its intervallic relationship with another pitch, you should feel really bad for yourself and the kind of company you keep.
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iSouLeZz
Registered User
Join date: May 2012
222 IQ
#3
I mean.. I guess, if you can tune your guitar very well without any tuner, you'd have a pretty good pitch perception..

But at the same time, if you have a good perception on pitch, you should be able to tune well anyway..

As Hail said, I don't think any of this is very relevant once you have a good tuner..

It's a nifty little thing to be able to tune well and accurately hear a pitch, but I wouldn't stress it as the most important thing..

I don't think there would be much scientific research on this..

But it makes sense, if you can accurately identify the correct pitch, you should be able to tune correctly as well
Hail
i'm a mean bully
Join date: Jan 2010
431 IQ
#4
i wonder if there's a video somewhere on the internet of somebody with perfect pitch trying to tune a guitar with poor intonation and blowing their brains out

cause i'd really like to see it

and also dub it over to be about modes because i'm original and edgy
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Hail killed MT

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I want to be Hail when I grow up.
iSouLeZz
Registered User
Join date: May 2012
222 IQ
#5
Quote by Hail
i wonder if there's a video somewhere on the internet of somebody with perfect pitch trying to tune a guitar with poor intonation and blowing their brains out

cause i'd really like to see it

and also dub it over to be about modes because i'm original and edgy



LMAO.
I could only imagine the frustration on that poor souls face haha
will42
UG's bassoon-master
Join date: Aug 2010
1,093 IQ
#6
Quote by Hail
i wonder if there's a video somewhere on the internet of somebody with perfect pitch trying to tune a guitar with poor intonation and blowing their brains out

cause i'd really like to see it

and also dub it over to be about modes because i'm original and edgy



This is the life of my college roommate actually. He has perfect pitch and he tunes by ear, but his acoustic guitar has awful intonation and can't be adjusted without a serious overhaul. It bothers him.

Back on topic, I knew a guitarist who didn't have perfect pitch, but could tune his guitar without reference pitches very well. I tested it once and he was just a few cents flat overall. So it can be done, but honestly its barely worth it.
Strauss!
"I am hitting my head against the walls, but the walls are giving way." - Gustav Mahler.

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absolutely what will said

Yay, my first compliment!
macashmack
Maskcashmack
Join date: May 2011
3,359 IQ
#7
Why not just train relative pitch and maybe tonal memory over middle C? It's a helllllllll of a lot easier than trying to get perfect pitch (which may not even be possible past the age of 4).
HotspurJr
Registered User
Join date: Jul 2011
191 IQ
#8
Quote by cakekindel
Just wondering if someone who's played guitar for years, and therefore tunes and retunes often and has to hear differences to get the optimal harmony from the strings, would then be better at hearing differences in sounds/notes/frequencies (pitch perception). I'd like to hear personal opinions AND any and all scientific backing to this topic. Thanks!


The more time you spend working with music in any capacity, the better you'll get at developing your ear.

However, you can develop your ear much faster if you put work into it specifically, by working on transcription, or using the functional ear trainer (from miles.be, a great free resource). Many people - self included - only develop their ear when they started working on it. Kids who start playing young generally develop their ears with less dedicated work.