#1
I am currently in a band right now (actually, we're still getting our crap together ), and our rhythm guitar switched to drums because we had a hard time finding one. Now, I'm the only guitarist. We can still play stuff like Motorhead and Red Hot Chili Peppers, I know. But I REALLY want to do War Ensemble by Slayer and One by Metallica, mainly to do the solos . But these, and a lot of other songs, involve two guitars greatly. Do you have any advice for me?
Last edited by hollowskull100 at Dec 10, 2012,
#2
Get a looper, record the rhythm track.

My local Craigslist always has a ton of guitar players. Look for someone or make an add if your comfortable with adding a new member.
Ibanez
Universe UV777 Signed by Steve Vai
Prestige RG2027X with Bare Knuckle Aftermaths
RG7621 swirled
Prestige RG1420
AEL207E
#3
you could always emphasize the bass, sort of making it pull double duty as a second guitar.

Must Not Sleep.


Must Warn Others.

Gear:
Gibson Special Faded SG
Orange Tiny Terror (Combo)
MXR Carbon Copy Delay
Dunlop Crybaby Wah

3DS friend code: 3995-7035-3562
#7
Pre-record the rhythm and play it back at the right time.

Or if not, forget the rhythm and play the lead. Maybe you can let the bass shine through at this time.
Ibanez RG2228 w/ EMG808Xs | Line 6 POD HD500 | Mackie HD1221
#8
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t0oyCXSd02U a little harmonizer once in a while and some pedal tones goes a long way

probably not necessarily the vein you're looking for, but if it's up your alley at all, HAARP machine have one guitarist as well i believe but he does a lot more overdubs and i'm honestly not sure how they pull it off live just yet
Quote by theogonia777
Hail killed MT

Quote by jongtr
I want to be Hail when I grow up.
#9
Thanks guys. The looper is a great idea, but the best way to play live would be to give the bass a bigger duty. I think he'll appreciate the spotlight.
My Equipment:
Jackson JS32 Rhoads (Hard Rock and Heavy Metal)
Fender Squier (Anything BUT Hard Rock and Heavy Metal)
Fender Frontman 25r

I know... it sucks.
#10
My advice is:

Dig down to the soul of the song, and figure out which guitar part the song really needs.

Few songs really need two guitars all the way through, and for a solo part or whatever you can find a way to make it work. But really, it's about listening and thinking, identfying what the core parts of the song are and going from there.
#11
Have not tried it myself yet but once read that you can pull it off with heavy distortion and some delay and reverb. Since you are the only guitar, effects help fill the hole in the sound while the bass and drums maintain the rhythm part. Don't go overkill with those effects, or you might end up sounding muddy.

I saw this on another site with video lessons when I was looking for ways to have a bigger a la Sabbath sound in case I played in another band without a rhythm guitarist like I always have... forgot the exact name of the site. It's the one where Kris Dahl teaches video lessons.
Last edited by CryogenicHusk at Dec 12, 2012,
#13
Quote by CryogenicHusk
Have not tried it myself yet but once read that you can pull it off with heavy distortion and some delay and reverb. Since you are the only guitar, effects help fill the hole in the sound while the bass and drums maintain the rhythm part. Don't go overkill with those effects, or you might end up sounding muddy.


My problem with this approach is that it often feels like you're faking it, which is counter-prouctive. I firmly believe that, in a performing setting, it's better to do the best version of what you can do with what you have than to try to fake having something else. One guitar won't sound like two guitars, and trying will often sound bad.

Instead, find the soul of the song and rebuild it for one guitar.

YMMV.