mdc
UG's Mr Chord Man
Join date: Feb 2008
722 IQ
#2
It's nice, dude. Listened to the whole thing. Your intonation is slightly flat on a couple of bends.

The chord changes at 2:09 - 2:13 you handled fairly well, though.
Last edited by mdc at Dec 18, 2012,
Seddon1707
Registered User
Join date: Nov 2009
872 IQ
#3
Quote by mdc
It's nice, dude. Listened to the whole thing. Your intonation is slightly flat on a couple of bends.

The chord changes at 2:09 - 2:13 you handled fairly well, though.


Cheers man, the bending thing's something I get a lot, been trying to work on it
AeolianWolf
Tonal Vigilante
Join date: Jul 2009
186 IQ
#4
train your ear more to work on your bends. also, you might want to work on keeping everything smoother - much of your phrasing is very detached, and it doesn't seem like you're intentionally going for that effect.

you take the time to breathe every now and then, which is good. but ultimately, your phrasing is not very memorable. you need to utilize more repetition and variation, instead of just hurling lick after lick at us.

remember that while we often think while we're improvising, the listener is not usually aware of what's going on at such a profound level. because of that, you want the listener to walk away with something memorable.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
food1010
Bassist
Join date: Jun 2007
1,660 IQ
#5
I like how you're trying to use some note choices that are a bit out of the box, or so to speak. However, your lead doesn't really imply the chords very well in some spots. If we were to mute the backing track, we should be able to guess what chords you're playing over based on the way you use tension and release in your solo (and obviously what arpeggios you use).

Try to study chord tones and extensions. Even though you're not going for a jazz sound, you could really benefit by studying some jazz.

Keep up the good work.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Seddon1707
Registered User
Join date: Nov 2009
872 IQ
#6
Again, cheers guys, that's really helpful I'll look into some more theory (sure there'll a good lesson on here somewhere)
evolucian
Registered User
Join date: Jul 2008
682 IQ
#8
Not bad. Though do remember you have to tell a story. For some ideas as to how to go about it, you could post a link to the backing track and let a few members jam on it. Perhaps some will come out of their hidey holes and rip it up. Griff would do some nice stuff on there (from what I can remember), perhaps food would grace us with a bass solo Kind of make it a christmas MT jam
food1010
Bassist
Join date: Jun 2007
1,660 IQ
#12
I should have some time tomorrow. The question is, whether I should do a bass solo or a guitar solo. Maybe both...

Edit: I'll probably forget, since I usually only check UG at night. I'll try to remember though.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
chronowarp
Registered User
Join date: Feb 2012
43 IQ
#13
It honestly sounds like you're just playing random bs. I mean that in the most endearing way possible.

There is no fluency or connection with what anything you're playing. There's no motif, development, or dynamic change.

Also your bends are really terrible. The biggest mark of a novice is your bends and vibrato, both of which could use a considerable amount of work. I feel like your tone and picking technique/touch are also contributing to the amateur vibe.

Think in terms of ideas rather than "these notes fit in this box hehe so i play them". You really STOP or complete an idea. Listen to what you're playing and build on what you're hearing, don't just keep trudging through the backing track.

Think about rhythm. You're not playing off the beat, but you're not locked into the track or grooving with it at all. You're also not doing anything exciting rhythmically, which is probably the biggest issue that most beginning guitar players have. The note choice isn't paramount, it's the execution, rhythm, and relationship to the other things around it.

Keep practicing dude.
food1010
Bassist
Join date: Jun 2007
1,660 IQ
#14
What do you know... I forgot.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Hail
i'm a mean bully
Join date: Jan 2010
431 IQ
#15
Quote by chronowarp
It honestly sounds like you're just playing random bs. I mean that in the most endearing way possible.

There is no fluency or connection with what anything you're playing. There's no motif, development, or dynamic change.

Also your bends are really terrible. The biggest mark of a novice is your bends and vibrato, both of which could use a considerable amount of work. I feel like your tone and picking technique/touch are also contributing to the amateur vibe.

Think in terms of ideas rather than "these notes fit in this box hehe so i play them". You really STOP or complete an idea. Listen to what you're playing and build on what you're hearing, don't just keep trudging through the backing track.

Think about rhythm. You're not playing off the beat, but you're not locked into the track or grooving with it at all. You're also not doing anything exciting rhythmically, which is probably the biggest issue that most beginning guitar players have. The note choice isn't paramount, it's the execution, rhythm, and relationship to the other things around it.

Keep practicing dude.


+++

i'm always dreading listening to these, then everybody "wow that was pretty good dude!"

and every time i'm disappointed
Quote by theogonia777
Hail killed MT

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I want to be Hail when I grow up.
Seddon1707
Registered User
Join date: Nov 2009
872 IQ
#16
Quote by chronowarp
It honestly sounds like you're just playing random bs. I mean that in the most endearing way possible.

There is no fluency or connection with what anything you're playing. There's no motif, development, or dynamic change.

Also your bends are really terrible. The biggest mark of a novice is your bends and vibrato, both of which could use a considerable amount of work. I feel like your tone and picking technique/touch are also contributing to the amateur vibe.

Think in terms of ideas rather than "these notes fit in this box hehe so i play them". You really STOP or complete an idea. Listen to what you're playing and build on what you're hearing, don't just keep trudging through the backing track.

Think about rhythm. You're not playing off the beat, but you're not locked into the track or grooving with it at all. You're also not doing anything exciting rhythmically, which is probably the biggest issue that most beginning guitar players have. The note choice isn't paramount, it's the execution, rhythm, and relationship to the other things around it.

Keep practicing dude.


Bit harsh, but helpful Thanks
griffRG7321
Theory buff
Join date: Sep 2007
999 IQ
#17
Quote by evolucian
Griff would do some nice stuff on there (from what I can remember)


HotspurJr
Registered User
Join date: Jul 2011
191 IQ
#18
Quote by chronowarp
It honestly sounds like you're just playing random bs. I mean that in the most endearing way possible..


I think this post is harsh but accurate.

The real problem is that there isn't a theme here, is there?

What's the melody of this improvisation?

Look, I don't want to be too harsh here because everybody goes through a phase like this. But there's an old saying: you have to be able to play a melody before you can play a solo.

There are a few moments of this which feel like they might be hinting at a theme, melody, or even just a motive, but you never develop it or do anything with it.

Yeah, you know, the bends are a little off sometimes. I'm not that worried about that. That'll come with experience and working on your ear. The bigger thing is giving me a reason to listen - to move beyond noodling around from one lick to the neck.

Take a look at Duane Allman's solo in "Blue Sky." Notice how he states that first theme, and then each subsequent 8 beat phrase is building off of the previous 8 beat phrase. By the end, it's hardly recognizeable (Duane's solo ends which the two guitars start doubling each other, after that it's Dicky Betts who does his own thing) - but you can feel how each 8-beat phrase feels connected to the previous one.

Here's a more complicated example of the same idea, in a radically different context:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NO-ecxHEPqI

In some of the variations, the original melody is obvious, but notice how in some of the variations the original melody is almost invisible unless you know it's there. But it's still informing all of the note choices. Masterful stuff. Variations 7, 8, and 11, for example are radically different transformations of the theme. If you didn't know, would you recognize the underlying melody? But when you hear them in context, you can hear how they're informed by the original tune.
Seddon1707
Registered User
Join date: Nov 2009
872 IQ
#19
Ah, alright, yeah I get what you mean, i'll have a gadge at the Allman solo
food1010
Bassist
Join date: Jun 2007
1,660 IQ
#20
Alright I was able to lay down a quick improv over this. I didn't do a fantastic job with dynamics/developing the "story," (i.e. where the song picks up, how it cycles through various melodic ideas), but I did try out a few different themes and demonstrated how to take a relatively simple melodic idea and develop it by adding syncopation and other rhythmic alterations or just extending part of it. There were a few times I would revert to just playing a bass line just to ground myself to the groove a bit better. This was kind of awkward since there was already a bass line in the song, but in a guitar solo, backing off to some chords can really help you feel out the progression. It also gives you some time to think ahead to the next dynamic change, groove change, or just shake off some stale melodic ideas and help you move on to something bigger, better, groovier, or whatever it may be. It also helps relieve the listener a bit and let some themes sink in.

Sorry for my tone, I was kind of digging in so that my fretless acoustic would be audible. I wasn't playing through an amp or going direct into some software, I just had the backing track playing through some speakers and my iPhone picking up both.

Edit: I should probably post a link, give me a second.

Here you go: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/f6dxyv8giwpqvfr/9DIc-_t_fz/20121225%20183211.m4a
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Dec 25, 2012,
Demian1695
Registered User
Join date: Dec 2011
89 IQ
#21
Nice jam, i think you would work on your bends, david gilmour from pink floyd is a big master of that technique!! i learn a lot of him
IbanezMan989
Registered User
Join date: Jan 2012
575 IQ
#22
Like above , Your rythem is good and your hittin the pocket.

I think you got alot of talent but we need to work on your skill if we are gonna get you to be one of the best.

Check your guitar first of all. Make sure it is in tune and that everything is set up right.

Bends are a big part that can get a guitar player in trouble or make him sound amazing. Do not bend to a spot you are not confident in to impress others, work on it! you can do it!

Stay in key. This will make is so u dont have that typical bad guitarest sound. Tho alot of your playing you are in key.

You dont have to play fast, yes i said it. Play something from your heart. Get to know the notes in the pentatonic scale first like the back of your hand. then go on to a mode you enjoy.

Good luck my friend, and i would jam with you anytime