STIRMling
Registered User
Join date: Aug 2012
1,032 IQ
#1
So, last night I was tuning my acoustic Ibanez Champion, when much to my dismay my G string broke (no pun intended haha). I went out to the garage to see if I had any spare strings but I didn't, so I put the guitar up and went to bed. This morning when I woke up, I begain playing on it just for fun when I realized that it actually sounds really good without the G string!! As long as you are pklaying mostly open chords, it sounds awesome. Even bar chords sound cool, as long as you have a few open ones in there to be able to distinguish between major and minor. Leads are kind of cool too, as you can switch back and forth between high's and low's very distinctly. Has anyone ever heard of someone making a guitar that can do this full time? A five-string acoustic that has no G string? All I have heard of is Keith Richards' 5-strings.
KG6_Steven
Eats ponies for breakfast
Join date: Nov 2006
3,129 IQ
#2
I've never heard of anyone intentionally doing this. Only problem with not having a G string, is on a root 6 barre chord, that string is providing the 3rd or flat 3rd interval. If you're up on your theory, this is the tonality that provides either a major or minor quality to a chord.

On a root 5 barre chord, it's an octave of the root chord, but a fairly important note if you intend to play a major 7 or 7 quality.

On open chords it's a toss up of what you're missing out on - no 5th, no 3rd, no flat 3rd, no 7, no major 7... it just depends on which open chord you're playing.

Would I intentionally remove the G and play without it? No. Here's a cool story and then I'm out. Back when my son and I were taking lessons from the same instructor... We went to our lesson one Saturday morning as usual. Well, my son always had this carefree, lazy attitude about his lessons. We each brought our own guitars as usual and my son was up first. He sits down and proceeds to tell the instructor that one of his strings had broken. He asks if he can borrow my guitar and I told him "no." I had let him borrow my guitars in the past for his lessons, until he started complaining about them and how he couldn't play them, because they were different. They weren't different, it was just his playing. Anyway, the instructor told him to suck it up and play the lesson with his guitar. The instructor told him it would be good practice in case he ever broke a string on stage. He played the guitar with the broken string, but you could tell he was struggling.

Bottom line... I want all 6 strings on my guitars. I have no problems switching back and forth between highs and lows.
STIRMling
Registered User
Join date: Aug 2012
1,032 IQ
#3
I would encourage you to try it sometime. It's not really that I have a hard time switching, but it just sounds very cool. And I do know about the major/minor dilemma, I mentioned it in the original post. But if you listen for it, you can tell what they are in context.
Captaincranky
Registered User
Join date: Sep 2011
288 IQ
#4
Quote by KG6_Steven
I've never heard of anyone intentionally doing this. Only problem with not having a G string, is on a root 6 barre chord, that string is providing the 3rd or flat 3rd interval. If you're up on your theory, this is the tonality that provides either a major or minor quality to a chord.
Indeed. If you delete the G string, and play a barre chord using the E major open shape, without the G string, what you have left, is a 5 string "5" chord, alias, "power chord" Power chords are very cool, are they not?

At the 3rd fret, (G5):

e-1 (3) G root
B-2 (3) D 5th
G-3 (missing)
D-4 (5) G root
A-5 (5) D 5th
E-6 (3) G root
STIRMling
Registered User
Join date: Aug 2012
1,032 IQ
#5
I did mention this, and in context it sounds fine.
KG6_Steven
Eats ponies for breakfast
Join date: Nov 2006
3,129 IQ
#7
Quote by Captaincranky
Indeed. If you delete the G string, and play a barre chord using the E major open shape, without the G string, what you have left, is a 5 string "5" chord, alias, "power chord" Power chords are very cool, are they not?

At the 3rd fret, (G5):

e-1 (3) G root
B-2 (3) D 5th
G-3 (missing)
D-4 (5) G root
A-5 (5) D 5th
E-6 (3) G root


In the correct context and not overdone, they are cool. For me, power chords get a bad rap, due to the fact I see nothing but power chords every time I go to Guitar Center and walk past the electric guitar/amp section. Too many kids only know how to play power chords and nothing more. To me, that's kind of like getting in a car, but you only go 10 feet forward, then you go 10 feet backward and repeat. I need a little more variety. Sorry for the partial rant on power chords, but I will promise you this - if I ever happen to break a string on any of my guitars, I'll give it a go and see what it's like. Unfortunately, I have yet to break a string and I've been playing for quite awhile.
STIRMling
Registered User
Join date: Aug 2012
1,032 IQ
#8
Yeah, I know. Power chords can be very cool, but thery need to be used sparingly.
Captaincranky
Registered User
Join date: Sep 2011
288 IQ
#9
Quote by STIRMling
Yeah, I know. Power chords can be very cool, but thery need to be used sparingly.
Ya think?