#1
Hey I'm new to this and I think this is the right forum.

How do I figure what is a Tonal Center? I think I have figured some:
Crazy Train-F#m shifting to A
Stranglehold-A(Mixolydian if you want that, but I leave it in A)
Mr. Jones-Am shifting to C
Electric Gypsy-Db
God Is Crying-G

Yes?
But I have this progression:
e:12--9--7-9
B:10-12-7-9
G:11-9--6-9
D:9--11-7-7
A:
E:
I don't know it, so I suppose that I don't know how to figure it out.
#2
The chords are B7sus4 C#m7 A69 Amaj7. It could be C#m but I'm not sure about it if I don't hear the song.
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#3
It's not a song or anything just a progression I made but to think of a rhytmn would be:
Quarter, half, quarter silence, quarter half, quarter silence at some 140bpm
#6
you use your ear?

figure it out the same way you figured out the other ones. obviously you have some idea what you're doing because you were able to figure out the keys of other songs.
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#7
Quote by AeolianWolf
you use your ear?

figure it out the same way you figured out the other ones. obviously you have some idea what you're doing because you were able to figure out the keys of other songs.

They have either a droning note(A in Stranglehold for example) or the progression is typical. I know how to differentiate modes/scales that's how I know Stranglehold isn't Phrygian for example. But progressions like that, with more harmonic content seem to be a wall for meor progressions that don't start on the l.
Last edited by satchfan9 at Dec 28, 2012,
#8
Quote by satchfan9
They have either a droning note(A in Stranglehold for example) or the progression is typical. I know how to differentiate modes/scales that's how I know Stranglehold isn't Phrygian for example. But progressions like that, with more harmonic content seem to be a wall for meor progressions that don't start on the l.


i suggest you forget what you know and start learning theory, then. ultimately this method of analysis you're employing is going to be of extremely little use to you.

also forget modes. for now.
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#13
I find it's significantly easier to find the tonal center without even looking at the changes.

Just sit there and play a note until you find the one that sounds best. That's probably the root or the fifth of the tonic. problem solved. If you can't hear what home sounds like, then that's a bigger issue than being able to infer the tonal center from a set of chords.
#14
Thanks guys, appreciated the help
Will study cadences.
The tonal centre was A I suppose, though it probably sounds good cause most of them had it ._.
#15
Quote by satchfan9
I know the theory on musictheory and other assorted what do I learn now?


so if i asked you what the vi was in Eb major, could you tell me off the bat?

if not, that might be something to work on. it's all well and good to be able to work it out, but ultimately you're going to have a lot of trouble applying it if you don't truly own the information.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#16
The tonal center has less to do with the actual chords and more to do with the note that the song want to resolve to. Training your ear will help you identify the tonal center more than theory. Don't get me wrong, you should still definitely learn theory, but for this, your ear will be more useful.
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Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#17
Quote by AeolianWolf
so if i asked you what the vi was in Eb major, could you tell me off the bat?

if not, that might be something to work on. it's all well and good to be able to work it out, but ultimately you're going to have a lot of trouble applying it if you don't truly own the information.

Yes, it's C. The only key that brings some problem is Bb as I don't know a single song on it(which helps me learn), but I'm working on that now
#18
Quote by Junior#1
The tonal center has less to do with the actual chords and more to do with the note that the song want to resolve to. Training your ear will help you identify the tonal center more than theory. Don't get me wrong, you should still definitely learn theory, but for this, your ear will be more useful.

I'm working on intervals, then going to chords, because my scale recognition is decent I think.
#19
what do you know of keys, TS?
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#20
Quote by Hail
what do you know of keys, TS?

Everything...
Quote by satchfan9
I know the theory on musictheory and other assorted what do I learn now
#21
oh my mistake
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Hail killed MT

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#22
Quote by Hail
what do you know of keys, TS?

Well if what's on musictheory.net is everything as MDC says, well everything.
#26
Quote by satchfan9
Yes, it's C. The only key that brings some problem is Bb as I don't know a single song on it(which helps me learn), but I'm working on that now


Cm. vi represents a chord, not a note.

if you're saying that you are only working on intervals now, you absolutely do not own any of the information that you say you know, i can tell you that for a fact. intervals are the tinker toys of music. without them a satisfactory understanding of music is extremely and needlessly complex if not impossible.

spend more time refining what you know - you will be very thankful you did come 2014.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.