#1
Hello Everyone,

I have two acoustics guitars, and I would like to down-tune one of them to D standard. I tried it out, and it sounded fine and was more playable than in standard tuning. The intonation seemed to be fine as well.

My question is if I can keep the guitar tuned down all the time, or if it's better to tune back up to E standard while it's being stored?

Thanks in advance
- M
Please view my first ever recording on my profile - Tangerine by Led Zeppelin

Guitars:
Schecter C-1 Classic
Ibanez EW20ASE acoustic

Amp:
Peavey XXX EFX 40
#2
Leave it be, it won't hurt it. My Ovation Elite has been in New Standard Tuning (CGDAEG) for more than a decade.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

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alhaq369
It is very impotent to success a business.
#3
like dannyalcatraz said. my husband keeps most of his guitars tuned to D all the time including his 1936 kalamazoo, 2 70's gibsons and his recording king, and they're all fine.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#4
Quote by Mishakuz
My question is if I can keep the guitar tuned down all the time, or if it's better to tune back up to E standard while it's being stored?
There's no need. In fact, guitars aren't shipped at standard pitch, (E-E), but rather either a half or whole tone down. It is also suggested to tune down to D-D when storing a guitar for any length of time.

My 12 strings will send their whole lives in D standard.

Depending on the scale length of you guitar, and your particular touch, you may want to try going up to a one gauge thicker string set. (This only if the bottom end sounds "loose" or "flabby").
#5
The bluegrass-country "jam" guys I play with occasionally have a lot of vintage instruments, and most of 'em tune down and then capo to standard pitch.
Takes a little strain off old wood....

It's annoying if they don't capo because then you have to do a lot of transposing in your head! Fortunately, most of these tunes are three-chord jobs.