crazysam23_Atax
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Join date: Oct 2009
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#1
Where can I find a pickguard, for cheap, with the following?:

Stratocaster shape [Not required but preferred]
Floyd Tremolo Bridge Cut
Double Humbucker cuts (neck & bridge)
Volume knob cut
Tone knob cut
5 Way Switch

Any suggestions? The cheaper, the better.
trashedlostfdup
diet coke fiend.
Join date: Apr 2010
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#3
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
Where can I find a pickguard, for cheap, with the following?:

Stratocaster shape [Not required but preferred]
Floyd Tremolo Bridge Cut
Double Humbucker cuts (neck & bridge)
Volume knob cut
Tone knob cut
5 Way Switch

Any suggestions? The cheaper, the better.


what specific guitar? for example i would think a HH configuration with a floyd with, pick guards like an ibanez.

or even a strat if it was already replaced with two humbuckers you would want strat shape.

pay attention to screw pattern. it likely won't be identical may not.
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crazysam23_Atax
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#4
Quote by trashedlostfdup
what specific guitar?

Well...this guitar (which is a Fender stagemaster)

As you can see, it's basically a "SuperStrat".

pay attention to screw pattern. it likely won't be identical may not.

This is a good point. Thanks.

Oh, note that I'll be throwing some SD Blackouts in there, which is why I'm getting a new pickguard.
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at Jan 31, 2013,
Maximus_2005
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#5
It doesn't appear to have one stock so why bother imo...

You would have to cut one urself otherwise
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crazysam23_Atax
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#6
Quote by Way Cool JR.
[Snip]

I honestly wouldn't put a pickguard on it myself, looks to good as it is. If you want to make it an H/H you could always just put your new pups in it and and just leave the middle pup disconnected and leave it in as a dummy pup.

I'm having a guitar tech put some actives in. Based on the fact that he will have to hollow out it bit, there won't really be room for a dummy pup. Fact is, I could install the new pickups myself, if it weren't for the fact that he will have to use a router tool.

So, I figure I might as well have this guitar tech cut and install a pickguard while he's at it. I was mainly trying to get one as close to what I needed as possible and let the guitar tech, so the guy doesn't have to cut it a ton.
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at Feb 1, 2013,
MrFlibble
Puts a bangin' donk on it
Join date: Apr 2008
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#7
What the hell? Installing new pickups does not require any routing. The only extra thing to fit with active pickups is the battery, which should fit in the existing control cavity; even if it doens't, or if you want to install a battery box anyway, that all goes in the back, not the front. There is no reason for anything on the front of the guitar to be changed.

I also want to point out that paying someone to install pickups for you is a waste of money anyway. With passives, it's a 30 minute job with a soldering iron that you can buy for next to nothing. With actives, they use solderless install systems and come with all the parts you need. I've never had a pickup install job take more than one hour, even with annoying guitars like Aerodyne Strats with their contoured surfaces, and hell if someone supplies the strings, I don't even charge for it. No bloody point, it's a complete non-job.

Do yourself a favour, get the pickups yourself, install them yourself. It's ridiculously easy. THere's no need to be routing anything, let alone trying to make up some bastardised 24-fret pickguard for a rear-route guitar, which I should point out wouldn't work anyway because the blade switch won't make it through both the guitar body and the pickguard, and the front of the bridge will snag on the pickguard, even if you have it cut to Floyd spec that bridge is mounted flush, it needs the top of the guitar to be level with its base, not three layers higher.
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crazysam23_Atax
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#8
Quote by MrFlibble
What the hell? Installing new pickups does not require any routing. The only extra thing to fit with active pickups is the battery, which should fit in the existing control cavity; even if it doens't, or if you want to install a battery box anyway, that all goes in the back, not the front. There is no reason for anything on the front of the guitar to be changed.

I also want to point out that paying someone to install pickups for you is a waste of money anyway. With passives, it's a 30 minute job with a soldering iron that you can buy for next to nothing. With actives, they use solderless install systems and come with all the parts you need. I've never had a pickup install job take more than one hour, even with annoying guitars like Aerodyne Strats with their contoured surfaces, and hell if someone supplies the strings, I don't even charge for it. No bloody point, it's a complete non-job.

Do yourself a favour, get the pickups yourself, install them yourself. It's ridiculously easy. THere's no need to be routing anything, let alone trying to make up some bastardised 24-fret pickguard for a rear-route guitar, which I should point out wouldn't work anyway because the blade switch won't make it through both the guitar body and the pickguard, and the front of the bridge will snag on the pickguard, even if you have it cut to Floyd spec that bridge is mounted flush, it needs the top of the guitar to be level with its base, not three layers higher.

I'm well aware of all of this. And I think I know my own guitar well enough to deem what it needs. I have installed my own pickups on other guitars. And yes, the guitar does need some routing. As you can see (pic above), it has a FR tremolo. There literally is no room for the batteries; trust me. You pretty much pre-judged that I know nothing about guitar, modding guitars, etc. I know a fair amount. I also know that I'd rather have a professional do this job. If I want to pay $100 to have someone else do it, why is that your issue?
MrFlibble
Puts a bangin' donk on it
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#9
Because it's a pointless waste when I've changed pickups on the exact same model of guitar before and know there's enough room. You can fit the battery between the blade switch and tone pot.

And more to the point, inexplicably getting in an arse with me doesn't change the fact that you will not be able to fit a pickguard to that guitar without getting something custom made from scratch and altering the bridge.
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crazysam23_Atax
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#10
Quote by MrFlibble
Because it's a pointless waste when I've changed pickups on the exact same model of guitar before and know there's enough room. You can fit the battery between the blade switch and tone pot.

And more to the point, inexplicably getting in an arse with me doesn't change the fact that you will not be able to fit a pickguard to that guitar without getting something custom made from scratch and altering the bridge.

1) There will be 2 batteries. I've taken this guitar's guts out, so to speak, and have determined that there's no way 2 batteries are fitting in there. 2) If a guitar tech is incapable of dealing with the pickguard, I'm pretty sure he can't alter the bridge. I've already talked to a tech, and I'm sure he can deal with that.

3) Stop being so damn condescending.
rubbert
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#11
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
1) There will be 2 batteries. I've taken this guitar's guts out, so to speak, and have determined that there's no way 2 batteries are fitting in there. 2) If a guitar tech is incapable of dealing with the pickguard, I'm pretty sure he can't alter the bridge. I've already talked to a tech, and I'm sure he can deal with that.

3) Stop being so damn condescending.



MrFlibble
Puts a bangin' donk on it
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#12
^ Useful.

And I wasn't aware that I was dealing with an e-psychic who can tell tone of voice through text on a message board. If you wish to read patronisation in my replies then be my guest, though I've no idea why you would.

If you want to use two batteries parallel for longer stints between playing, take a look at EMG's external power supplies; these will keep you going for longer than two parallel batteries will, and take up no space within the guitar. If you're planning to use two batteries in series for 18v operation, simply don't. This is no benefit to running SD Blackouts or EMG X pickups at 18v; they have the same headroom with 18v as they do with 9v.

As for the bridge, it's not so much an issue of "can he think he can sort this out", it's more an issue of "this will require the bridge and neck to be altered so much, it'll take forever to do, it will be very easy to render the guitar completely unusable in the process, it will cost a small fortune and you'd save more money by simply buying a new guitar". Physically having the tools and knowing the theory really isn't enough with a job like this. This sort of job is right up there in complexity, risk and cost as converting a bolt-on to set neck or switching a Floyd for a Tune-o-Matic; save your money, buy a new guitar, it'll be cheaper and quicker.
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