#1
Recently bought a Gibson LP traditional pro II from GC (apparently it's a GC-only model), and among it's features it comes with Grover locking tuners. While at the store I noticed that it didn't keep tune too well, but it was a pretty minor problem that I figured would go away with a new set of strings. Notably the G string was having difficulty (the B string had some issues, but not as severe), and I was having to retune after every piece I played.

Even after changing the strings (yes, they were changed correctly), the problem persisted, so I spoke with the guitar tech at GC who took a look at the nut and filed it down a little bit, saying that there was probably some artifact from the manufacturing process stuck in there; he subsequently told me that if the problem persisted I should probably just bring it back to get it exchanged for a new one. Anyways, the fix certainly helped, but it didn't fix it completely. Since then I've changed strings again, but I'm still having to retune the G after every song/jam; it's not off tune by much (if I had to guess, less than 1/8 of a step), but enough to where it bothers me.

I'm not straining the G any more than the B or E when it comes to bends, yet it's the only one that consistently loses tune. So I suppose what I'm trying to figure out is whether I'm being too anal. I love the guitar, it looks beautiful, sounds great, and plays like a dream. But knowing that my Martin and my MIM strat, both of which cost less than the LP, stay in tune much better than my most expensive guitar kind of bothers me, especially considering the LP is the only one with locking tuners. With the strat I usually have to retune after a solid 20-30 minutes of improv, and the Martin pretty much stays in tune forever, even with bends (granted). So what would you guys do? Try to exchange it for another one of the same model? Try to get the tech to look at it again?

Any input is greatly appreciated.
#2
Its a Les Paul.. I don't remember the exact term for it but its the way the headstock lines up with the neck. It adds sustain but it won't stay in tune as long. All les pauls do that, except the alex lifeson with the floyd rose system . Strats stay in tune much better than les pauls, fact of life
#3
Exchange it.

If it has tuning problems in the shop, you probably shouldn't take it home.

I think this applies to most things in life. xD
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#4
Either exchange it or ask Gibson warranty service to replace that tuner.
#5
why would tuning change unless string is stretching or machine head is not staying put?
#6
I have a Gibby LP Traditional Mahogany Satin with the Tonepros Kluson Vintage tuners and it stays in tune incredibly well. I personnally don't really like grovers, but its a matter of taste
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#7
I've had a couple LP's in the past, both Epiphones, and both had rock solid tuning. I'm not sure what the issue could be with a straight up tune-o-matic system, but I would return it. It'll be worth the wait to get the dream guitar that actually functions like a dream guitar.

Sorry, bud! I hate those tuning woes.

Quote by EyeNon15
Thats too bad, I was under the impression I was arguing something profound


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#8
Quote by boris6389
Recently bought a Gibson


Well theres your problem.

Its getting out of tune because the tension doesn't stay evenly distributed on both sides of the nut. When you bend a string it pulls slightly more string through the nut, and then because nuts are retarded and not designed well, the string does not go back because of friction. So you've increased the tension behind the nut, and decreased the tension over the fretboard. It happens to G more often, maybe just because you do more bends on it, maybe for some other reason.

I first noticed it on my epiphone Les Paul, but now it happens all the time on my strat. I think I've just started bending a lot more.

Solutions are A: lock the strings down at the nut, or B: decrease the friction at the nut so the string can naturally correct itself. Both of these pretty much require changing the nut.
#9
Quote by Danjo's Guitar
Well theres your problem.

Its getting out of tune because the tension doesn't stay evenly distributed on both sides of the nut. When you bend a string it pulls slightly more string through the nut, and then because nuts are retarded and not designed well, the string does not go back because of friction. So you've increased the tension behind the nut, and decreased the tension over the fretboard. It happens to G more often, maybe just because you do more bends on it, maybe for some other reason.

I first noticed it on my epiphone Les Paul, but now it happens all the time on my strat. I think I've just started bending a lot more.

Solutions are A: lock the strings down at the nut, or B: decrease the friction at the nut so the string can naturally correct itself. Both of these pretty much require changing the nut.



A little pencil lead in the nut goes a long way towards fixing those issues for you.

Quote by EyeNon15
Thats too bad, I was under the impression I was arguing something profound


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#10
^ This +1.

I've always used pencil lead on my bridge saddles, and I just recently started using lead on the nut on one of my guitars that was pretty unstable as far as tuning, and it really made a difference. I'm probably going to start doing that from now on when I restring.
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#11
return it and get the chicago blue traditional from sam ash for $1599.
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#12
Quote by gregs1020
return it and get the chicago blue traditional from sam ash for $1599.


+1

But the problem is the nut. He might have filed it out some, but I doubt he did it perfectly. Best thing to do with a new Gibson is to just replace the nut. Easy to do yourself with a preslotted one from Graphtech.
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#13
Yeah, graphite works a bit. Really, I can't understand how it would go out so much. I don't like the LP/SG bridge either, a string breaker. I prefer locking nuts and FL type trems where you almost never break a string bending (well me only once in the last 4 years) and I tune a few cents with the fine tuners every few hours (also much easier to tune while your playing)
#14
it's common. they don't always slot the nut well enough for even 10-46s from the factory. but it's usually nothing that working a fresh string through a few times won't fix, just be careful not to make the slots too deep.

or replace it easily enough as said.
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Last edited by gregs1020 at Jan 24, 2013,
#15
I'm surprised to hear your plight. I had one of those (just traded it), and it was pretty solid about staying in tune. Sounds like you've got a bum guitar. I'd return it.
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#18
Quote by halfj06
A $2000 guitar better hold tune like a woman holds a grudge..



Quote by EyeNon15
Thats too bad, I was under the impression I was arguing something profound


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#19
Quote by halfj06
A $2000 guitar better hold tune like a woman holds a grudge..




I wouldn't own a guitar that won't stay in tune and I'm damn sure not paying $2000 to be pissed off.
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#20
As well as any hand finished guitar

I also found that staying in tune was also very dependant on how you strung them.

I always found the 'Gibson' method worked well, I would say lube the nut up and string it properly and see how you go.

1977 Burny FLG70
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2016 SE Holcolmb
#21
If its worth anything, anytime I have tuning issues, its typically with the dreaded G string.

All 5 of my guitars fall out of tune a bit from time to time depending on what Im playing (lots of bends), and TEMPERATURE/HUMIDITY.

3 of my guitars are $1500 +.
#23
Mine stays in tune like a boss until a string needs replacing.

It's usually the G that goes first for some reason.
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#25
this may seem like a stupid question but if the guitar has locking tuners are you using them correctly? there shouldn't be any slack for the guitar to really go out of tune (provided the nut is good). it's not a perfect setup but locking tuners usually work really well. of course if you are a basher when playing then it may knock it out of tune no matter what you do.
#26
I don't really see the point in locking tuners when you can make your ordinary tuners work in essentially the same way by the way you restring them.

Assuming the strings have stretched and you've used the locking method of stringing, then it's most likely the nut causing the problems.
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#27
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
I don't really see the point in locking tuners when you can make your ordinary tuners work in essentially the same way by the way you restring them.

Assuming the strings have stretched and you've used the locking method of stringing, then it's most likely the nut causing the problems.


locking tuners have virtually no extra string length so there is nothing to move in the nut slot. granted a properly cut nut is essential to tuning stability. also no fuss when restringing.
#28
Quote by monwobobbo
locking tuners have virtually no extra string length so there is nothing to move in the nut slot. granted a properly cut nut is essential to tuning stability. also no fuss when restringing.

You can do the same thing with non-locking tuners.

The way the locking string method works is by ensuring that the part of the string that is running over itself is tight. If it's tight, there is no way in hell the string is going to move.

Also restringing a guitar this way is extremely easy with practice.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Jan 26, 2013,
#29
I find locking tuners advantage is the time it allows you to save.

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2004 EBMM JP6
2016 SE Holcolmb
#30
If you need to do up one string in 10 seconds flat, i can see your point.
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