liamdude555
Registered User
Join date: Jun 2008
742 IQ
#1
does anyone know what the stock string size for the epiphone joe pass emporer ii is? cause i want to put some flatwounds on and was wondering if .14swould work
T00DEEPBLUE
Boba FRETT
Join date: Oct 2010
2,246 IQ
#2
There is no such thing as a 'stock size'. Just go with whatever works for you.
Regarding the furry fandom from the man himself:
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T00DEEPBLUE
Boba FRETT
Join date: Oct 2010
2,246 IQ
#4
If it doesn't fit in the nut, just widen the slots. It won't do the guitar any harm so long as you know what you're doing.
Regarding the furry fandom from the man himself:
Quote by Axelfox
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Guitbuilder
Registered User
Join date: Apr 2009
98 IQ
#5
I'd go with the lightest gauge flatwounds first. Heavier strings will produce a louder volume unplugged, but be harder to bend and play. The action required on heavier strings might make playing harder also.
I love the sound of flatwounds on a jazz guitar. Go for it.
KG6_Steven
Eats ponies for breakfast
Join date: Nov 2006
3,139 IQ
#6
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
There is no such thing as a 'stock size'. Just go with whatever works for you.


One could certainly argue that there is a stock size for a given guitar. I'd say it's the gauge the guitar was initially set up to use. While it's possible to have a guitar set up for a different string gauge, the size it's set up for will perform the best.

And with an acoustic guitar, it's even easier to say they use a "stock size."
KG6_Steven
Eats ponies for breakfast
Join date: Nov 2006
3,139 IQ
#7
Quote by Guitbuilder
I'd go with the lightest gauge flatwounds first. Heavier strings will produce a louder volume unplugged, but be harder to bend and play. The action required on heavier strings might make playing harder also.
I love the sound of flatwounds on a jazz guitar. Go for it.



If you can't bend them, you just need more practice. I have 11 gauge flatwounds on my Taylor T5 and have no problems. My custom Taylor GS came with 13s installed and I can bend them all day long. Practice is all you need.
jpcl
Registered User
Join date: Mar 2010
381 IQ
#8
Quote by KG6_Steven
If you can't bend them, you just need more practice. I have 11 gauge flatwounds on my Taylor T5 and have no problems. My custom Taylor GS came with 13s installed and I can bend them all day long. Practice is all you need.


You can bend bass strings too, doesn't mean they aren't harder to bend, which does make playing harder and worse for some people. There's more to it then just "practise more".
T00DEEPBLUE
Boba FRETT
Join date: Oct 2010
2,246 IQ
#9
Quote by KG6_Steven
One could certainly argue that there is a stock size for a given guitar. I'd say it's the gauge the guitar was initially set up to use. While it's possible to have a guitar set up for a different string gauge, the size it's set up for will perform the best.

And with an acoustic guitar, it's even easier to say they use a "stock size."

The problem with this argument is what is considered 'best' is very subjective, which is why there isn't really such a thing as the 'best' gauge. It's just that it doesn't make much sense from a manufacturing point of view to cut nut slots for string gauges that aren't all that conventional. But just because a gauge is popular doesn't mean it's the recommended one to use.
Regarding the furry fandom from the man himself:
Quote by Axelfox
Please understand how little we as a community care
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Jan 26, 2013,
KG6_Steven
Eats ponies for breakfast
Join date: Nov 2006
3,139 IQ
#10
Not sure if you fully grasped what I was saying there. When I say "best", I mean for the guitar in its current configuration. Hence, why I said "the size it's set up for will perform the best."

I have different saddles cut for my acoustic guitars, so that if I want to change string gauges, I can. I have one particular Taylor acoustic that came with 11s stock, however it will accept 12s with the necessary changes. Until I make the proper changes, using 11s will work the best on it. Without changing the configuration of a guitar to accept the new strings, you're going to have some issues. You can either choose to accept those issues and play as-is, or adjust the guitar for the new "stock size."

So, "your" best and the guitar's best are really two different concepts.
KG6_Steven
Eats ponies for breakfast
Join date: Nov 2006
3,139 IQ
#11
Quote by jpcl
You can bend bass strings too, doesn't mean they aren't harder to bend, which does make playing harder and worse for some people. There's more to it then just "practise more".



But practice is a major part of being able to do anything on the guitar, bending included.
jpcl
Registered User
Join date: Mar 2010
381 IQ
#12
Quote by KG6_Steven
But practice is a major part of being able to do anything on the guitar, bending included.


Indeed it is, but your taking a different approach now after I commented, because you stated on how practise was all that was needed in that matter when it isn't true.

Everyone is different, so while some may only need practise, others may have to look for other options. People sometimes do like to get carried away on how gear limits us, but the truth is that it can be that way, and why guitarists normally warn newer players of how important it is to try things out (guitar, amp, pedals, strings, you name it) and see how it feels to them, not for anyone else.
Roc8995
Moderator
Join date: Nov 2005
2,050 IQ
#13
This is dumb. You guys sure can turn a simple question into a ridiculous argument.

Stock strings are the ones it came with, which are .10s. Best is subjective but 'stock' isn't. Come on.

His question was whether he could put .14s on. To answer the question - yes, but you'd almost certainly have to re-slot the nut. They make lighter gauge flatwounds, though. You could probably do 12s with the stock nut. Truss rod and intonation would still need adjustment.
jpcl
Registered User
Join date: Mar 2010
381 IQ
#14
Quote by Roc8995
This is dumb. You guys sure can turn a simple question into a ridiculous argument.

Stock strings are the ones it came with, which are .10s. Best is subjective but 'stock' isn't. Come on.

His question was whether he could put .14s on. To answer the question - yes, but you'd almost certainly have to re-slot the nut. They make lighter gauge flatwounds, though. You could probably do 12s with the stock nut. Truss rod and intonation would still need adjustment.


That simple question had already been answered, and arguements are a part of life. We're not shouting/insulting/harassing each other, so I don't see how this is all somehow "dumb".
We were still kinda on topic as well, since it's about how easy/hard it'll be for him to play if he goes on with his idea.
Roc8995
Moderator
Join date: Nov 2005
2,050 IQ
#15
It's dumb because the question wasn't answered before people started fighting about whether there's such a thing as stock string gauge and several other unrelated arguments that don't help this guy figure out whether he can use 14s or not.

The simple question wasn't answered. Not even a little bit. He asked what the stock gauge was and whether he could drop 14s in without slotting the nut. I don't see an answer to either of those questions in the first dozen posts. All I see are non-answers (if it doesn't fit you'll have to slot the nut) and then responses to those non-answers (use whatever gauge you want/no such thing as stock/practice more etc.)

Guitbuilder had the only actual helpful response in there and it got immediately picked apart and turned into something it wasn't. The guy wants help figuring out if he can restring a certain way and you're off arguing about whether you should practice more or get strings that you like, as if that were a rational thing to argue about.