xSinisterx
Registered User
Join date: Apr 2010
20 IQ
#1
So I recently began voice lessons, and my teacher has a masters in music, which is a major plus. Unfortunately, he only teaches classical type music.

If i were to stick around would this end up being helpful in the long run? Could I apply what i learn here to singing my own music of entirely different styles?
blazing riff
Registered User
Join date: Jun 2008
10 IQ
#2
If you're interested in a classical type of music i ' stick with it, probably the same techniques. However if you're more into the grunting kind of thing, defenately change. You wouldn't stick with a classical guitar teacher if you would just like to learn rock would you?
Brotherbrodude
Registered User
Join date: Dec 2011
201 IQ
#3
Go with a Matt Barlow style. He's got the most unique vocal style ever. Operatic, yet metal as hell. But yea, get a new teacher, unless you're interested in classical music.
Brotherbrodude
Registered User
Join date: Dec 2011
201 IQ
#4
Quote by blazing riff
. You wouldn't stick with a classical guitar teacher if you would just like to learn rock would you?


Actually, look at Zakk Wylde. and even Yngwie. Gary Holt from Exodus too.
blazing riff
Registered User
Join date: Jun 2008
10 IQ
#5
Quote by Brotherbrodude
Actually, look at Zakk Wylde. and even Yngwie. Gary Holt from Exodus too.


You forgot Randy Rhoads. I know there's a lot to be gained by incorporating classical style in your playing, but it's just to prove a point. If you want to learn a certain style fast, go for that style and not something different. If you want to learn the finer points of blues music you should study or learn from great blues players and not guys shredding it up. And before you go off on me, every music style has its own little nuances, that's why i gave that metaphor .
Brotherbrodude
Registered User
Join date: Dec 2011
201 IQ
#6
Quote by blazing riff
And before you go off on me, every music style has its own little nuances, that's why i gave that metaphor .


Chill bro. Not going off. Just proving my own point that other styles can be learned through one. We're all friends here. The best three styles to start with are classical, jazz and blues in my opinion, then switch to metal. Guitar-wise. I didn't and now i regret it. Moving into Jazz though. Vocal wise, probably blues. I get the metaphor too. You do have a point about the nuances.
hey896
Registered User
Join date: Jul 2012
163 IQ
#7
even if your voice teacher likes classical, their suppose to do whatever type of style you want to do. i had a guitar teacher who liked classical but she had to play the music i wanted to play and teach me the techniques for that type of genre i wanted to play. i'd say stick with it, i mean, you paid for it so you might as well just go and if you don't like how the teacher is or the type of music their teaching you, go and find a new teacher. plus, there are some techniques for all genres that you could totally learn from this teacher even thought they l;ike classical.
hollowskull100
HollowSkull100
Join date: May 2012
40 IQ
#8
Quote by blazing riff
You wouldn't stick with a classical guitar teacher if you would just like to learn rock would you?

Hell yeah, I would! Chris Broderick, Yngwie Malmsteen, Randy Rhoads, and all of those incredible guitarists are usually classically trained. Knowing classical guitar benefits you playing by 10x. If I could go back and learn gutiar all over again, I would have learned classical first.
My Equipment:
Jackson JS32 Rhoads (Hard Rock and Heavy Metal)
Fender Squier (Anything BUT Hard Rock and Heavy Metal)
Fender Frontman 25r

I know... it sucks.
Last edited by hollowskull100 at Jan 29, 2013,
Sethis
Registered User
Join date: Dec 2011
10 IQ
#9
Classical singing and rock singing have a lot in common. More than other genres. Rock singing usually relies on Bel Canto, a classical concept. At least, I'm talking about the basic principles and clean styles of rock like Dio, Labrie or just about any power metal band...Not growling/screamo.

But I would definitely advise you to get a teacher that will know your genre better. If they don't, then they will get you up to a certain point but may not be perfectly qualified to teach you some advanced genre-specific techniques.
Last edited by Sethis at Jan 29, 2013,
HotspurJr
Registered User
Join date: Jul 2011
82 IQ
#10
Quote by xSinisterx

If i were to stick around would this end up being helpful in the long run? Could I apply what i learn here to singing my own music of entirely different styles?


I do think eventually you'll want to work with someone who focuses on contemporary musical styles. However, I think that, to build up your foundation, working on classic music is just fine. In fact, it might even be a plus, because one of the big mistakes a lot of people make when learning to sing with contemporary music is trying to copy the affectations of the singers they like without getting the fundamentals right.

That's a much smaller risk if you start with a classical approach.

The downside is that a lot of classical singing aims for purity at the expense of personality. You end up expressing the music more than you express yourself, if that makes sense. The other risk is that you will feel less connected to your practice, and thus less motivated, because you're not singing the music you love.

So, with those two caveats aside, I think it's a fine way to develop and work on your fundamentals.