#1
Hi everyone, new member . Just some background: I took some speech level singing voice lessons about a year and a half ago for a few months but it was just way too expensive to keep up and I had to stop going before I even learned how to sing in mixed voice. I ordered a singing DVD program so I could try and find mixed voice but I've heard that (mixed voice) sounds chesty and as I go higher in my range it doesn't sound chesty or feel chesty (or maybe strong is a better word).. I can now however sing things without breaks in my voice so maybe thats good?

I've also read that sometimes people can connect their falsetto to chest voice. is that true? and if so am I singing in mixed voice or just a connected falsetto?

sorry for all the questions it's just really confusing for me when I don't have someone to tell me if I'm doing something wrong or not.


https://
soundcloud.com/demi3o5/memo-1

https://
soundcloud.com/demi3o5/memo-2

(sorry for avoiding the forbidden link Idk if thats against the rules or not!!)
#3
^He's right. Don't be afraid to hit the notes. But it's definitely some kind of falsetto.

Ideally, a trained singer should not think his voice as having separate parts but it should be continuous and without any obvious or sudden change in tone.

Of course, there are singers who intentionally sing "incorrectly" for artistic purposes. You can do it too sometimes, just make sure it's not a crutch for not improving your skills.
Last edited by Sethis at Feb 7, 2013,
#4
Quote by Sethis
^He's right. Don't be afraid to hit the notes. But it's definitely some kind of falsetto.

Ideally, a trained singer should not think his voice as having separate parts but it should be continuous and without any obvious or sudden change in tone.

Of course, there are singers who intentionally sing "incorrectly" for artistic purposes. You can do it too sometimes, just make sure it's not a crutch for not improving your skills.


^i disagree, I think a singer should be consistently watchful of where s/he is in his voice and be thinking about how s/he approaches the notes in that area

That said, this is definintely falsetto, I can hear the flip clear as day.
I teach private lessons in voice, hit me up if interested!
#5
Quote by Tyson2011
^i disagree, I think a singer should be consistently watchful of where s/he is in his voice and be thinking about how s/he approaches the notes in that area

That's why I said "intentionally incorrect".
#6
Quote by Sethis
That's why I said "intentionally incorrect".



I was meaning your point about ideally not thinking of the voice in separate parts. You want to have a similar timbre throughout the voice, but to do so you have to think of your voice in the sections its divided in
I teach private lessons in voice, hit me up if interested!
#7
If your into speech level singing I highly suggest Singing Success by brett manning, I used it and saw great results. Its not cheap but its cheaper than seeing a speech level singing coach on the regular. Obviously lessons in person are best, but I always reccommend a singing program like singing success if its not an option.
#8
It sounds like your voice is already connected through the whole range, you just don't know how to 'belt'. To belt, all you do is use your diaphragm to mix in chest voice.