#1
Hi I'm a Ibanez RG 370 DX user...
Features include a basswood body, INF pickups, a double locking tremolo and a Wizard II neck with bound rosewood fingerboard..

I'm changing my bridge pickup and neck pickup to crunch lab and liquifire. I want to know

1) How much change does it make changing the pick up?

2) How does Guitar body affect the tone of a guitar ?

3) My guitar is has five way selector switch for pick ups But i want the tone of the middle position of a three way selector is that possible anyhow in my guitar?
#2
1. Either a lot or a little.
2. Some say yes, some say no
3. Yes

Before you buy pickups, what amp fo you have?
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#3
Quote by jeleopard
1. Either a lot or a little.
2. Some say yes, some say no
3. Yes

Before you buy pickups, what amp fo you have?


Not a high class amp .. I have a Roland Cube 20XL
Last edited by Rangonsp at Feb 12, 2013,
#4
In that case don't bother with pickups.
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#5
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
In that case don't bother with pickups.



And how is it posible to get the middle pick up tone of a 3 way selector in a five way selector guitar?
#6
Remove the middle pickup and get a 3 way selector.

And yea, don't bother with the pickups YET.
Legion!
Original 1969 Fender Jazzmaster
Jackson JS32R Dinky "Curry"
ESP/LTD SN-1000
Jackson Stars Kelly "Aiko"
Ormsby SX6 prototype
Dingwall NG-2 "Kimmy"
MiM Fender Jazz Bass "Pancho"
EVH 5153
Last edited by jeleopard at Feb 12, 2013,
#7
DO NOT bother with the pickups with that amp. I have that pickup set in an RG, and it is terrific, but a quick jam through cube 15 shows that they really don't matter with a little practice amp.
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#8
Spend your money on a better amp, and then worry about the pickups. I've a Cube 30 that I keep around for headphone jamming late at night and you really can't tell much difference between factory Epi LP pickups and a Duncan Blackout. Yes, there IS a difference, but with the tonal capabilities of the amp it isn't worth the money, especially if that's all you're running them through.
#9
1. Rather than CHANGING the tone, I'd say pickups COLOR the tone.
2. Studies indicate that for electric guitars (especially with high gain pickups), the wood doesn't really mean much when it comes to the sound.
3. The five way selector is way more versatile. Just use it a bit and you'll find it preferable. I much prefer the HSH setup to the HH setup.
#10
1) Depends on the amp being used, the play style, the tone desired, the player and the models of pickup in question. Changing from one A5, underwound humbucker to another A5, underwound humbucker, playing with high gain on a digital modelling amp, is going to yield no change in tone whatsoever. Changing from a ceramic, overwound humbucker to an A2, underwound single coil with low gain on a class A valve amp is going to produce a very obvious change.

2) Depends on the construction of the guitar and what body differences you're talking about. Body wood really matters on set neck guitars (fretboard wood barely matters; neck wood matters somewhat), somewhat matters on bolt-ons (fretboard and neck wood dominate) and is largely irrelevant with neck-through construction (the neck and body centre wood dominates the body and fretboard wood by far). Overall body mass (shape) matters a lot for all designs, though the only consistent difference is that more mass of the same wood results in more sustain, at least when talking about bodies made of the same number of pieces of wood; cheaper bodies, made with inferior wood and more pieces of wood glued together, may not sustain as well even if there is more mass to the body style. The type of bridge your guitar has (as well as other hardware) also has a very large effect on the tone; guitars with recessed double-locking vibrato bridges often sound fairly similar regardless of the body wood, style or construction.

3) Yes, but on a normal 5-way switch the only way to get the bridge & neck tone is by sacrificing the middle & neck or bridge & middle positions. By switching the middle and neck pickups around, for example, you get bridge, bridge & neck, neck, neck & middle and middle; you are losing the bridge & middle tone but gaining the bridge & neck tone. Of course this does also mean that you are changing where the neck and middle pickups come in the switch, too (or the middle and bridge, whichever you've chosen to swap over).
Another way to get the neck & bridge tone is to replace you current normal 5-way switch with what is called a 'super-5-way' switch and also use a push-pull, push-push or on/on mini toggle switch. With these two things together you basically have two 5-way switches in one (the on/on or push-pull switches between which mode the 5-way is in). The Fender S-1 switch operates in a way very similar to this.
The final and simplest way to get this tone is to simply have an on/on (or again, other 2-way switch) attached to one of the pickups, which can add it in (or remove it) from any position. You can then have the bridge & neck together or even all three pickups on at once. The only problem with this is that it can be easy to forget that you've turned the pickup on and you end up wondering why all the positions sound odd, not just one of them.

Quote by progdude93

2. Studies indicate that for electric guitars (especially with high gain pickups), the wood doesn't really mean much when it comes to the sound.
A) No, every time somebody comes up with a 'study' on this it is always with a sample size of <4 instruments, rending the ''study'' a waste of time, B) there's no such thing as a "high gain pickup", and C) wrong, wrong, wrong.


Edit: and yes, with a Roland Cube (solid state didigtal modelling amp), you're not going to notice much difference between any pickups unless you're making a really extreme change (and even then, nothing will particularly revolutionise the sound).
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Last edited by MrFlibble at Feb 12, 2013,
#11
I'm just gonna say that the body wood doesn't affect the tone nearly as much as an EQ pedal and a little patience.
#12
Well, nothing effects the tone as much as an EQ pedal. Better yet, two EQ pedals. Stick one before the amp and one after and you can get any sound you want, more or less. Boss used to make a nice double EQ unit that would take presets you could cycle through, don't think anybody else does that sort of thing now. That thing was basically a tone cheat sheet.
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