#1
I have been learning arpeggios using CAGED shapes they are like scale anyway my question is do arpeggios have to start on a root note?
#2
To be tonaly correct i would say so.
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#4
Quote by mdc
No.

Ok i stand corrected . ( I thought were you started was called the root note. But then again i dont know theory or scales at that. I just play!)
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#5
Absolutely not. Learn your arpeggios across all six strings whatever the arpeggio.
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#7
My other question is do i need to Sweep pick arpeggos ? I have only been learning my arpeggos with Alternate Picking .
#8
Quote by dazzzer30
My other question is do i need to Sweep pick arpeggos ? I have only been learning my arpeggos with Alternate Picking .


No..
#9
If you are a rock player, probably more immediately useful is to learn the diagonal arpeggios shapes, ie the three octave ones that go up the neck as well as across the strings. What is nice about these is that they are patterns that repeat every two strings. Much like pentatonic shapes, this makes it (relatively) easy for most people to improvise with them compared to the CAGED shapes.
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#10
Quote by StuartBahn
If you are a rock player, probably more immediately useful is to learn the diagonal arpeggios shapes, ie the three octave ones that go up the neck as well as across the strings. What is nice about these is that they are patterns that repeat every two strings. Much like pentatonic shapes, this makes it (relatively) easy for most people to improvise with them compared to the CAGED shapes.


+1

Paul Gilbert has a few lessons on youtube going over this and other ways to arpeggiate chords, you should check them out. I found his string skipping ones to be especially useful, even if I can't come close to playing them at the speed he does
#11
Quote by zl1288
+1

Paul Gilbert has a few lessons on youtube going over this and other ways to arpeggiate chords, you should check them out. I found his string skipping ones to be especially useful, even if I can't come close to playing them at the speed he does


can you link me?
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#13
to paul gilbert i pray for forgiveness.......amen!
Never got to arpeggios myself. I find them super confusing sounding and i just never sat down and tried to learn them. I guess thats my next quest. Onwward!
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#14
Quote by bburritt1
to paul gilbert i pray for forgiveness.......amen!
Never got to arpeggios myself. I find them super confusing sounding and i just never sat down and tried to learn them. I guess thats my next quest. Onwward!

Yea go for it,, and a little tip from someone else who is also now learning arpeggios
dont follow patterns from books or tabs
find the notes you want for major minor diminished etc
print out some blank neck diagrams and write out the notes and find your own arpeggios..
But this goes up to 11
#15
Paul Gilbert is like a guitar prophet. I have heard so much from this guy, not just on how to play, but just general knowledge in Music and Guitar.
#16
I agree, Paul is excellent in front of the camera. He's also pretty straight up about learning, which is quite refreshing.
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#17
Know see i dont know scales from adam so this will be new for me. I just been augmenting the penatonic scale for 11 years.
The Rig of Joy:
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Epiphone Prophecy
Washburn Southern Cross 34 of 100
Ibanez TS9,AD9,GCB95, Multi Chorus and TU2
#18
I agree, Paul is excellent in front of the camera. He's also pretty straight up about learning, which is quite refreshing.


One of my teaching heroes, I would love to be as insightful and funny as Paul.
#19
stop learning everything by frets. l

earn the notes on the fretboard eveywhere. when you play something you should be able to recall every note you just played, if not you're doing it wrong. Learn what notes make certain triads and once you know the notes on the fretboard you can map out your own arpepggios, for example, i know that an Em triad root consist of playing the notes in this order E, G, B. Now i can find all the E, G, B on the fretboard and make awesome shit, just out of a single triad. Now add the possiblity of inversions, sequencing, 7th arpeggios, suspended arpeggios, and 7 different triads within whatever key you are in.

endless. learn your notes.
I still like Dream Theater
#20
Quote by bburritt1
Know see i dont know scales from adam so this will be new for me. I just been augmenting the penatonic scale for 11 years.


A completely valid approach ... I don't know if Jeff Beck knows what he's doing yet (I would guess not) but it's doesn't stop him playing like an angel.

You might want to get into the theory side though, it can only enrich your playing further.
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#21
Quote by Another Won
stop learning everything by frets. l

earn the notes on the fretboard eveywhere. when you play something you should be able to recall every note you just played, if not you're doing it wrong. Learn what notes make certain triads and once you know the notes on the fretboard you can map out your own arpepggios, for example, i know that an Em triad root consist of playing the notes in this order E, G, B. Now i can find all the E, G, B on the fretboard and make awesome shit, just out of a single triad. Now add the possiblity of inversions, sequencing, 7th arpeggios, suspended arpeggios, and 7 different triads within whatever key you are in.

endless. learn your notes.


You make a very good point - and one that many people overlook. The guitar is so wonderfully visual however, that it does make sense to learn 'shapes'. I agree that the understanding of notes must be there too, but ultimately, once you know all the patterns and the fretboard, creating music becomes a far less intellectual activity and more one of expression within the familiar patterns that you already know.
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