RockAddict311
RockAddict311
Join date: Jul 2006
141 IQ
#1
So I'm currently checking out two SGs at reputable mom and pop shop. A 2010 and a 1999 model. Both standard and in excellent condition. I plan on playing before I buy, but I was wondering if anyone could shed some light on anything to look for on 99 models. Was 1999 a good year? The 10 model is $900. The 99 is $950.
randywolf244
resident arrogant
Join date: Feb 2013
50 IQ
#2
guitars almost always age with the 25 year rule. they slowly drop in value for 25 years then jump in value again. so if the older one is more expensive its prolly a nicer model check it out and it'll prolly sound better. good luck man
Last edited by randywolf244 at Feb 28, 2013,
Sakke
Chaser of 'Tone'
Join date: Jul 2009
120 IQ
#3
The 99 model has to be upgraded somehow I think... It doesn't really make sense otherwise.. If they're really both standard and stock models, I'd try to ask the seller which one will go for a lower price. Then of course play both of them. They might have the same neck shape and all, but they will certainly feel different.
Gear pics

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RockAddict311
RockAddict311
Join date: Jul 2006
141 IQ
#4
I saw the $50 difference online and I was wondering what could be the cause besides age. If it's in better condition than the newer one, I probably won't be able to resist. Their EC classification isn't the highest and allows some minor wear. The highest being Mint. I can deal with a nick or two and some buckle rash. Looked nearly mint online. My MIM strat from around 04 is in pretty good shape IMO and I've played her pretty hard.
Robbgnarly
Tab Contributor
Join date: Feb 2011
290 IQ
#5
The 99 has an ebony fretboard.
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jetwash69
Registered User
Join date: May 2008
244 IQ
#6
Quote by RockAddict311
I saw the $50 difference online and I was wondering what could be the cause besides age. If it's in better condition than the newer one, I probably won't be able to resist. Their EC classification isn't the highest and allows some minor wear. The highest being Mint. I can deal with a nick or two and some buckle rash. Looked nearly mint online. My MIM strat from around 04 is in pretty good shape IMO and I've played her pretty hard.


Although the guitar value might start going up at 25 years, it won't be by much. Guitars aren't really considered "vintage" until about 1973 and earlier, but even then only certain makes/models really have much value. Fenders and Gibsons tend to do better than many of the other brands from that era. Modified guitars actually lose value unless they belonged to someone really famous (like Dweezel Zappa's Hendrix guitar).

I'm not sure how static that 1973 date is, but I get the sense there's a lot of reasons why it might not just be a straight 40 years. It's improbable that your '04 MIM Strat will be worth a lot more in 2050 than a new strat. It wouldn't be like 10+ times what MIMs cost then, like how a 1967 Strat in decent shape starts around $15K these days. There's too many other cultural factors that tie in with the 1950s and '60s guitars that won't apply to the Noughties guitars ever.
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RockAddict311
RockAddict311
Join date: Jul 2006
141 IQ
#7
Quote by Robbgnarly
The 99 has an ebony fretboard.


They claim it's rosewood. The pics seem to lean that way as well
RockAddict311
RockAddict311
Join date: Jul 2006
141 IQ
#8
Quote by jetwash69
Although the guitar value might start going up at 25 years, it won't be by much. Guitars aren't really considered "vintage" until about 1973 and earlier, but even then only certain makes/models really have much value. Fenders and Gibsons tend to do better than many of the other brands from that era. Modified guitars actually lose value unless they belonged to someone really famous (like Dweezel Zappa's Hendrix guitar).

I'm not sure how static that 1973 date is, but I get the sense there's a lot of reasons why it might not just be a straight 40 years. It's improbable that your '04 MIM Strat will be worth a lot more in 2050 than a new strat. It wouldn't be like 10+ times what MIMs cost then, like how a 1967 Strat in decent shape starts around $15K these days. There's too many other cultural factors that tie in with the 1950s and '60s guitars that won't apply to the Noughties guitars ever.


I was thinking the same thing. Rock n' Roll is still relatively new, but I'd never plan on my strat appreciating. That's why I was puzzled with the 99 increase. Before your post I would have guessed the 70's was the cutt-off. I figured it was a quality thing, maybe better wood.
randywolf244
resident arrogant
Join date: Feb 2013
50 IQ
#9
Quote by jetwash69
Although the guitar value might start going up at 25 years, it won't be by much. Guitars aren't really considered "vintage" until about 1973 and earlier, but even then only certain makes/models really have much value. Fenders and Gibsons tend to do better than many of the other brands from that era. Modified guitars actually lose value unless they belonged to someone really famous (like Dweezel Zappa's Hendrix guitar).

I'm not sure how static that 1973 date is, but I get the sense there's a lot of reasons why it might not just be a straight 40 years. It's improbable that your '04 MIM Strat will be worth a lot more in 2050 than a new strat. It wouldn't be like 10+ times what MIMs cost then, like how a 1967 Strat in decent shape starts around $15K these days. There's too many other cultural factors that tie in with the 1950s and '60s guitars that won't apply to the Noughties guitars ever.


Oh I completely agree, that's just the rule i was taught working at my gramps shop. But keep in mind there are also many external factors to consider like in fenders case an owner change the pre-CBS models, for example the 64s are worth triple what the 65s are worth. And that's mostly a rule of thumb but for the most part it rings true. Just think in 68 everyone wanted the new strats instead of the 50s models, but now everyone wants the 50s and the post cbs models are still sought after but not near as much
jetwash69
Registered User
Join date: May 2008
244 IQ
#10
Yeah, there's a lot of factors. Fender has more factors than others, with the whole pre/post-CBS issue and some other milestones. And yeah, they were made with old-growth woods that aren't available now, but that has less influence on tone in solid-body electrics than many would have you believe. As the pickups age, they aren't what they used to be. Also old Strats used to be wired a little different and didn't have as much shielding. And wound G strings used to be the norm.

But matters relating to the quality of the guitars don't have much of an influence on the value; other cultural factors drive the market. Generally, these aren't being bought by musicians. Even when they are, they're rarely bought to actually play because that only stands to lower the value of the instrument.

TL;DR: Cost of vintage instrument usually does not correlate directly to how good it sounds.
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randywolf244
resident arrogant
Join date: Feb 2013
50 IQ
#11
Quote by jetwash69
Yeah, there's a lot of factors. Fender has more factors than others, with the whole pre/post-CBS issue and some other milestones. And yeah, they were made with old-growth woods that aren't available now, but that has less influence on tone in solid-body electrics than many would have you believe. As the pickups age, they aren't what they used to be. Also old Strats used to be wired a little different and didn't have as much shielding. And wound G strings used to be the norm.

But matters relating to the quality of the guitars don't have much of an influence on the value; other cultural factors drive the market. Generally, these aren't being bought by musicians. Even when they are, they're rarely bought to actually play because that only stands to lower the value of the instrument.

TL;DR: Cost of vintage instrument usually does not correlate directly to how good it sounds.


VERY much agreed. gramps bought a 72 strat several years ago for about 3 grand several years ago, then sold it for about 10. the thing sounded like crap but it sold within a day to a collector from nashville. btw im sorry if my knowledge is really fender based, gramps' shop was a fender dealer and i've always played fenders so thats pretty much the only thing i really know about lol
jetwash69
Registered User
Join date: May 2008
244 IQ
#12
Quote by randywolf244
VERY much agreed. gramps bought a 72 strat several years ago for about 3 grand several years ago, then sold it for about 10. the thing sounded like crap but it sold within a day to a collector from nashville. btw im sorry if my knowledge is really fender based, gramps' shop was a fender dealer and i've always played fenders so thats pretty much the only thing i really know about lol


Well, Fender is a great place to start, and I can see why some people never make it past Fender.
Although it didn't take me long to appreciate Ibanez and many of the other brands.

Fender just doesn't have enough affordable offerings in HH 24-fret flavors. But I have yet to get into Gibson; they're on my lottery wish list, but not very high on it. I can understand why people do like them a lot for sure, though.
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Last edited by jetwash69 at Feb 28, 2013,
randywolf244
resident arrogant
Join date: Feb 2013
50 IQ
#13
Quote by jetwash69
Well, Fender is a great place to start, and I can see why some people never make it past Fender.
Although it didn't take me long to appreciate Ibanez and many of the other brands.

Fender just doesn't have enough affordable offerings in HH 24-fret flavors. But I have yet to get into Gibson; they're on my lottery wish list, but not very high on it. I can understand why people do like them a lot for sure, though.


agreed that gibsons are great guitars, i just dont really like the block shape, i dont even play teles for that reason, i like my guitars to fit me like the strat does.

in the last 12 years i've owned ibanez, gibson, schecter, gretsch, and rickenbacker and never really liked them all that much, just didnt really have the right kind of mojo for my play style.
jetwash69
Registered User
Join date: May 2008
244 IQ
#14
Quote by randywolf244
agreed that gibsons are great guitars, i just dont really like the block shape, i dont even play teles for that reason, i like my guitars to fit me like the strat does.

in the last 12 years i've owned ibanez, gibson, schecter, gretsch, and rickenbacker and never really liked them all that much, just didnt really have the right kind of mojo for my play style.


I see where you're coming from.

My favorite is still my Squier Affinity Strat, even over my MIJ and MIA Fenders. But it was my least favorite before a pro setup and extensive mods
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Last edited by jetwash69 at Feb 28, 2013,