#1
Hi Guys

Im hoping you can help me get the sound I hear in my head. Im looking for a more modern (but retaining part of that classic sound) version of spectors famed 'wall of sound' style sound.

Below are a couple of examples from the manics' 'postcards from a young man' album which is the type of sound i'm looking for.

Again, please pardon my ignorance in being able to explain what i'm after or why I like this. I'm not the most technical and dont have the best 'ear' but to me this just sounds amazing and everything is big, yet it all sits well in the mix without any part being overbearing. Thats the best I can explain it. Please listen to the attached clips and any advice or help would be greatly appreciated. (on the second clip the 'big' sound from 17 seconds in is exactly what i'm after - or as close to)

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Thanks :-)
#2
as the links havent appeared, please check out hazleton avenue or somekind of nothingness from the album which are the two links I tried to post - cheers
#4
Ok, you're really not asking a specific question. For all we know, you could need help with everything from getting an audio interface to sculpting your guitar sound...
#5
Turn up to eleven and insulate the room. Boom. Like during the Metallica:Classic albums dvd where James created his own "wall of sound"
#6
Phil Spektor?

Every audio track sent to a reverb auxillary.

Edit: I didn't actually read the OP. But yer a reverb auxilary accepting all the audio signals will defiantly help that wall of sound. (I will be studying Spektor in depth in a about 6 weeks).

I honestly don't see why you couldn't experiment using other effects besides a reverb on this auxiliary track either like a chorus or a harmonic effect.

Fun stuff.

You should post a sample of your work soon.
Last edited by roaraudio at Mar 3, 2013,
#7
Phil Spector's "wall of sound" was all about layering and doubling. You don't need reverb to pull this off unless you want reverb. (though he did use reverb)

Basically, it's the premise that one person sounds like one person, and 10 people sounds many times bigger. The key is ultra-tight timing. It's also all about EQ-ing and selecting voices (and/or instruments) so that they blend rather than compete. That's the hard part.

It's something we take for granted now. Everyone does it. But before Spector, the standard method for recording was to have everyone set up live in the room, set the mics up and let fly. Look for videos that show Elvis, or Buddy Holly or the like in the studio. There's lots out there. You had the guitars and vocals that were in the room and that was it. George Martin took it one step further and did all sorts of crazy stuff that, now, we also take for granted - like close-miking, etc.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
Last edited by axemanchris at Mar 5, 2013,
#8
Phil Spector? All he really did was throw loads and loads of shit on top of the mix to saturate it with different textures and timbres. And then shoot somebody.


The modern 'wall of sound' is more about using multiple takes of identical or similar parts to create a thick stereo sound.
#9
Quote by kyle62
Phil Spector? All he really did was throw loads and loads of shit on top of the mix to saturate it with different textures and timbres. And then shoot somebody.


The modern 'wall of sound' is more about using multiple takes of identical or similar parts to create a thick stereo sound.


And Then shooting somebody.
Guitars:
LTD Alexi-600 White & Black
LTD Alexi-200 Black(Death Adder pickup & Gold OFR)
Agile Interceptor Pro 727 7-string
Jackson JS30RR rhoads
Jackson DKMGT
Squire telecaster

amps:
Bugera 6262 212 loaded with WGS veteran 30's
Last edited by Gundamnitpete at Mar 5, 2013,
#11
Something I've heard to get that big sound is have a different guitar and amp on the right and the left and then a guitar through a fuzz pedal plugged directly into an interface and then mix that in n both sides. It makes a full sound.